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Full text of "Exercises in the composition of Greek iambic verse [microform], by translation from English dramatists"

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887.62 

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K99 Kynaston, Herbert, 1835-1910. 

Exercisea in the composition of. Greek Iambic 
vorse, by translation from English dramatists, 
with' introduction and index of phrases, &c. ar- 
ranged , by Herbert . Kynaston . . . London;lMacmillan, 
1879. 

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GEEEK IAMBIC VEESE 






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EXEECISES 



IN THE COMI'OSmON OK 



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GREEK IAMBIC VERSE 



BY 



TRANSLATION FROM ENGLISH DRAMATISTS 




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ARIUN6ED liY 

HERBERT KYNASTON, M.A. 

(Formerly Sxow) 
PRINCIPAL ou^(fn,li»^ELi^]^(^ 

DEPARTME\'T. 

or 

GREEK. 



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PREFACE. 



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AJTU PARLtAMEST aTBBKT 



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At a time when the usefulness of all Verse Com- 
position is being so generally questioned, and 
schoolboys are beginning to speculate upon the 
possibility of passing through a University career 
without any knowledge of Greek, it may be con- 
sidered a lost labour to compile an Exercise Book 
for instruction in Greek Iambics. But as long as 
the works of the Greek Tragedians live, we must 
hope that some desire will survive of becoming 
familiar with the language in which they wrote 
and the metre in which the thoughts and actions 
which they presented to their Athenian audience 
were arranged: and this familiarity cannot be 
attained without actually handling and modelling 
the material to which they gave such perfection 
of form and such vigour of life. The discipline 
by which this study is to be matured must be at 
first more or less mechanical, and the student 
must accustom himself to the manipulation of 
words and phrases into the requisite shapeliness 



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VI 



PREFACE. 



of metrical form and rhythmical balance, before 
he can indulge in any higher aspiration after the 
ideal of poetic art. Therefore the Exercises in 
this book are intended to help him in learning 
this manipulation ; and by the dissection of pieces 
already translated by scholars of eminence, to 
show the process by which the results have been 
attained. 

It is undoubtcoij a very difficult thing to find 
the particular Greek word or phrase by which 
some one eL^e has intended the English which he 
considers its equivalent to be rendered : perhaps 
there is l)ut one thing more difficult, and that is 
to hit upon the particular English word or phrase 
which is most likely to be rendered by the Greek 
which will suit the occasion. The art of com- 
posing Greek Verse, however, is more teachable, 
I l>elieve, tlmn that of composini^- I^atin; and 
therefore I have more hope of the possible success 
of this book. It is true that no gocxl English- 
Greek Lexicon exists: but the struggling com- 
poser will be all the more benefits by the 
additional trouble involved in first forcing his 
memory to produce some word, and then investi- 
gating its fitness in a Greek-English Lexicon. A 
Gradus, in Greek Composition, is not needed, as 



i 



PREFACE. 



Vll 



there are few, if any, words in which the quantity 
of any syllable is not after a very brief experience 
manifest to one who thoroughly learns a few 
simple rules such as will be set forth in the Intro- 
ductory Remarks to these Exercises. 

It only remains for me to express my grati- 
tude to the Rev. F. St. John Thackeray and J. E. 
Sandys, Esq., for some translations of theirs which 
they have allowed me to use ; and especially to 
the Rev. H. A. Holden for the numerous extracts 
which by his favour I have made from his ' Folia 
Silvulae;' and to apologise to them for having 
mutilated these pieces past recognition, in the 
faint hope that they may recover some slight 
resemblance to their originally elegant form. 



H. KyN ASTON, 



Cukltknham: May 25, 1879. 



'J551Ff''-7rV'jr« 'V- 



I 



CONTENTS. 






iNTRODUCTOnV REMARKS 



PAGE 



Part L 



Vocabulary 



82 



Part II US 

Index op Phrases and Combinations connected 
WITH Nouns representing Leading Ideas 156 



IV- I.I. rVtJ. 






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EXERCISES 



IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GEEEK IAMBIC VEESE 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 

It is presumed that the student of Greek Verse Com- 
position who iLses tliis book will be ah-eady familiar 
with the ordinary rules for the Rhythm and Csesuras 
of the Tmgic Trimeter Iambic, and have had some 
practice in applying them. A few remarks on Pro- 
sody and Language, however, may still be requisite,- 
or at least not supei^uous. 

I. Quantity of Vowels. - 

1. € and before single consonants ai*e, of course, 
always short. 

2. ij and ui ai'e always long. 

3. Diphthongs are always long, except oi in the 

words oToC, TOLOVTO^, TOlOfT^ty TTOIW, 

4. a, «, V, before single consonants are more fre- 
- juently short than long, except where a is the result 

. of a contraction or crasis, or follows p ; or where v is 
in the penultimate syllable of the futui*e or fii-st aorist 
of a verb with a vowel stem. But, as no general 

B 



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2 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OP 

mles can be framecl for these vowels, their quantity in 
different words must be ascertained by experience. 
Befoi-e vowels, they are sometimes long; e.g. a in such 
words as tcdu) and vXaw (which ai-e Attic forms of »:a/<ii 
and K\ai(it) — i in Uwfiai and its derivatives, and in 
aWa, ai\-m, icoWa, IrifJ^^ — ^ ^ ^^'^f ^^h ^"*^pwto». 

5. All vowels are long before 

(i.) A double consonant. 

(ii.) Two liquid consonants. 

(iii.) Two mute consonants. 

(iv.) <T with any other consonant. 

(v.) A liquid followed by a mute consonant. 

(vi.) /3/i, flr, yii, y»', h; 

6. A short vowel becomes common in the middle 
of a word, before all other combinations of two conso- 
nants in which a liquid follows a mute ; and is gene- 
rally lengthened at the end of a word, when it is also 
the end of a foot, and the following word begins with 
/3X, y\, or p. 

II. Elision. 

1. Only short vowels can be elided. (There are, 
however, two instances in Aiistophanes [^Nuhes, 780, 
988] in which the diphthong at of the infinitive is 
elided.) 

2. V is never elided. 

3. r is vei7 i-arely elided when it is the termination 
of the dative singular ; and never when it is the ter- 
mination of the dative plui-al, or of the nominative or 
accusati'/e of a noun, or in the words r/, ore, irtpt. 

4. The final syllable of oi/xoi is sometimes elided 
before a;c> 




GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 3 

III. Hiatus. 

1. Vowels that cannot be elided must not be left 
open at the end of a word before a vowel. 

2. Exceptions to this rule ai'e r/, on, Trtpi, iZ, 

IV. Crasis. 

1. Koi, roi, and the definite article, are combined 
with the initial vowels of succeeding words according 
(in most instances) to the ordinary laws of contrac- 
tion ; aiid the instances where they deviate from these 
should be learned from a good Greek grammar. 

2. iyijila for tyw ol^a, and fiovoTi for fiot ttrA, are 
doubtful examples of crasis, of which the former 
should probably be referred to Synecphonesis, and the 
latter to Prodelision. 

V. Synecphonesis. 

1. A long vowel or diphthong at the end of a word 
sometimes is combined with a succeeding vowel or 
diphthong into one syllable without a formal crasis. 
The principal instances are T/, /xj), kiru, iyw, before ov : 
fii) and xpJ? before elcivai : iyw befoi*e el fit, 

2. A rare instance, jjit) aCiKtivy occui'S in Eur. 
Hipp, 997. 

3. To this should also pi*obably be referred the 
coalition lyio oJca. 

VI. Prodelision. 

1. A long vowel or diphthong at the end of a 
word very frequently elides a succeeding short vowel. 

2. The short vowel thus elided is, with very few 
exceptions, the e of the syllabic augment, or of ei' or 
ini and words compounded with them, or of zyw. 

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4 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

yil. Synizesis. 

1. Two syllables in the same word are sometimes 
combined without a formal contraction. 

2. The mast common instiinces are genitives in no 
and €0)Q : and all cases of Beoq, Less common are 
genitives in viov and voiy, as ^Epiyvuv, ivoly; and ta, 
as a\\* £0. 

Language. 

The dialect of the Greek Tragedians is the Middle 
Attic ; so tliat in Greek Iambic composition the aug- 
ment must not Ije omitted, except in long narrative 
speeches which partake of an Epic chai-acter : all con- 
tracteil forms of verbs must l^e ased : and frtr be pre- 
ferred to TT. Some Ionic forms are generally admis- 
sible, such as ii'ii'OQf ^ovvoQ, ovyofia, yovvara, ^ovply 
fiiaaoQj Korii uviKa : and some Doric foims, as Kwayoq^ 
iro^ayoc, Xo)(ayoc, orra^oc, ^npoVi iKaTi, Aflctva, Kapa- 
vov : and in .^Eschylus the .^olic forms irelnpmoQy 

Other notable j)eculiarities are rcr, frtpt (him, her, 
or them); orov, orw, otolq (fi*om o<mc); ^laOa and t(f>7ja6a : 
TrroXtc for noXig (when the preceding syllable i^ecjuires 
lengthening); iffiiv and vfAiv (with final syllable short). 

Syntax. 

1. The imperative is used idiomatically in relative 
clauses follo^^ng a question, as if attracted to the im- 
perative which follows. Such questions are generally 
introduced by ol<r0a, as oltrO* oZr o cpaaov^ Ilec, 225, 
and oiaBa vvv fx fxoL yiviaOtOy I. T, 1204. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 5 

2. The infinitive is used — 

(L) In prayei-s, with ellipse of toe, curt^ or tv- 

(ii.) With the aii-icle to to express a consequence. 

3. The aorist participle is used with i^u) as equiva- 
lent to a perfect. 

4. Cei-tain special phi-ases for the use of preposi- 
tions should be remarked and remembered ; as, 

(i.) afi(j)\^ iiQf U-j irpoQy with nouns used ad- 
verbially ; e.g. ufi(fi rapl^ei, * in teiTor * ; 
tia TuxovQ, * quickly ' ; ci opyrjcy Trpoc 
opyt)p, 'angi-ily*; i^ Wov, 'equally'; it: 
fiiag, TTpoQ i^iai'y * violently * ; irpoQ ii^ovijr, 

* agreeably.* 

(ii.) a' t^ppa^y cia ciKTjQ lii'ai riviy *to quarrel,* 

* go to lilW.' 

(iil) Ik, refen-ing to a change of condition ; as, 
rv^Xoc Ik hcopKOTOQf * once clear-sighted, 
now blind.' 
(iv.) iTTL ^vpov, Itti (Tfiik'pdr fjoTT^c, * at a crisis.' 
(v.) fTr' tlupyaafiirot^, * when the deed is done.' 

5. A genitive of relation follows adjectives (gene- 
rally verbal) compoiuided with a privative, where part 
of such adjective is so connected with the following 
genitive as to have the appeai'ance of governing it ; e.g. 

iiiroirToc ofifiarioyy ' out of sight.' 
aOiKTOQ TrolfivTjCy * untouched by the flock.' 
aOiKTos ^vpov, * unshaven.' 
afOeyKTOQ Xoyuty, * dumb of speech.* 
AyevtFTOQ kacci/v, * without taste of woe.* 
lixaXkoc uffiricioyy * without brass of shield.' 



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6 EXERCISES IN THE COMrOSITION OF 

d<T»:ei;oc ufnrllufi; * iinfomisliecl with shields.* 
fi^anToc <^i\wi', * unfenced by friends/ 
(Kpofvog Qjodt, * without utterance of prayer.* 
u^o^TH-oc jcw<cv/i«rw>', * witliout clamoiu' of lamenta- 
tion.* 

6. Generally the Greek tragedians express them- 
selves with great indulgence in Pleomusm and Peri- 
phra-sis, and pile up cpithetvS and synonyms upon one 
word or idea. * A brother,' e.g. is called Ivvai^ov 
ofifia ahXipov : * a king * might be entitled KXeitov 
irpoautTTov rvpavyiKov flr€/3cic : * a wall * is expanded into 
(Tefiyai iraXaiCjy T€i\Eiity •KtpnrTv\ai : things which are 
* known ' are also * not unknown,* and persons who 
are * willing * are also * not unwilling * : and such 
Pleonasms are elements of strength, where in T^tin 
verse they would I'atlier bet my weakness. 

jq'.B. — An English-Greek Vocabulary, containing 
nearly all the words in the Exercises of this Part, will 
be found on page 82. No English-Greek Lexicon 
should be used. 

An index of words repi^senting leading idesis in 
tragic poetry, furnished with phi*ases taken from 
i^Cschylus, Sophocles, and Euiipides, will be found 
foUo^ving the exercises. It is hoi>ed that this may be 
of use as a vocabuLiry of combinations for some time 
after these exercises have been done, and done with. 



GBBBK UMBIC TERSE. 



PART I. 

Exercise 1 (a). 

Two voices ai'e there : one is of the sea, 
One of the mountains ; each a mighty voice : 
In both from age to age thou didst rejoice, 
They were thy chosen music, Liberty. 

At the first survey of a passage of English poetry 
which has to be rendered into Greek Iambic vei'se, we 
natui'ally look for some words or phmses upon which 
to build the framework of our translation. For these 
we must di'aw upon our memory of Gi-eek dnimatists, 
and select some expressions that will suit the English, 
and guide us as to the arrangement of the lines. The 
four lines which are here proposed for translation 
present no very striking opportimities of this kind; 
but the words * from age to age ' natui-ally suggest t6v 
IC aiijiyoQ •)Q)6yoyj and for ' Lil)erty ' we shall of neces- 
sity put TovXivQtpoy, which will find its most appro- 
priate place at the end of the fourth line. The fii-st 
two lines present no sjKJcial difficulty, only we must 
observe that * each ' of two things is not e/caoroc, but 
tKCLTipoQ, and that, as SaXaacra is a word better adapted 
for the former than the latter half of a line, it will be 
as well to invert the order of the two sentences * one 
is of the sea, one of the mountains.' 

Some such process as the above should be adopted 
with all passages for translation. 










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EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



Take for a liteml adaptation of these four lines 
the following : 

Thei-e are two voices (dual) : one is-bom of the 

mountains, 
Another of the sea : each mighty. 
In both rejoices (pf. of yr/^tw) for ever (as above) 
As in cliosen (i^aiperot:) melodies, Liberty. 



EXEKCISE 1 (h). 

There came a t}Tant, and with holy glee 
Thou fought'st against him ; but hast vainly striven : 
Thou from thy Alpine holds at length ai-t driven 
AVliei*e not a tonent mui'mui*8 heai-d by t 

Make five lines of these four. Some moi^e per- 
sonal agent than TovXevOEpoy must be introduced as 
the subject of the ver)>s * fought'st/ &c. ; and the ex- 
pression * Alpine holds ' i-etpiires cxpan^sion by Peri- 
phnisis so common to the Greek tragedijins. 

Say *thou, irpiaj^itrTt} Qifii, joined'st battle, right- 
eously i*ejoicing (Kixapfihrj), and wrestling in vain 
from fenced places and lofty summits art driven out 
(perfect) [to a place] where thou hearest nowhere a 
toiTent's voice (/500/ia yti^appoi),' 



Exercise 1 (c). 

Of one deep blLss thy ear hath been bereft : 
Then cleave, O cleave to that which still is left. 
For, high-souled maid, what sorrow would it be, 
That moimtain floods should thunder as before, 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. ^ 

And ocean bellow from his rocky shoi-e. 
And neither awful voice be heard by thee ! 

Wordsworth. 

This wiU requiie eight lines. 

* Of one deep bliss,' <fcc., say, ' Of this one (f^arepov) 
charm of heaiing already thou hast been deprived 
(hTTuaTtpiuj),' and finish 2nd line with * but, O high- 
souled maid.' 

3rd line, ' thou must (let) hold on to the joy that is 

left (pf. pju-t.).' 

4th line, * for what fortune could be more grievous 
than this.' 

5th line, * if mountain streams,' <fec. Expand the 
word ' thunder ' into ' give a deeply-roaring sound,' or 
the like ; and * ocean ' into ' utterance of waves of the 

sea.' 

8th line, ' iind thyself should'st hear neither aefivoy 

fiiXogJ 



Exercise 2. 

How blest is he who his progenitors 

With pnde remembers, to the listener tells 

The story of their greatness, of their deeds ; 

And silently rejoicing, sees himself 

Linked to this goodly chain ! For the same stock 

Bears not the monster and the demigod : 

A line, or good or evil, ushers in 

The glory or the terror of the world. 

A. Swanwickffrom Goethe, 

* With pride remembei-s *— say, * remembeiing i-e- 



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l?vj v^-. "-yj 






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10 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



joices : 'to the listener '—say, Mn conversation' 
(Xoya,v Iv^aWayai). 'Sees himself linked to this 
goodly chain »-say, 'adding himself with pleasure to 
the number of illustrious men/ So much in four lines : 
men, 'an okoc does not at once ^cX^l andpuv, kc. 
^onster, a\AtTTu,f.) ; hut a seed of many both good and 
bad brmgs to mortals ruin or preservation/ 



Exercise 3. 

Heaven doth with us as we with torches do; 

Not light them for themselves ; for if our virtues 

Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike 

As if we had them not. Spirits are not finely touched 

But to fine issues ; nor nature never lends 

The smallest scrupk^ of her excellence, 

But like a thrifty goddess, she determines 

Herself the glory of a creditor. 

Both thanks and use. Shakspeare. 

Fii-st two lines thus :-' Heaven (Bed,) uses mortals, 
as moitals use lamps, which shine not for their own 
sake.' 

Next two :-' For all our vii-tues that (cV^ro). .Va. ) 
are hidden, it is as if (ofiowv cig ^0/ ^' 

5. ' Spirits (9fnr£i:) are not aroused finely, 

6. save Tijy KaXwy eKari. 

7. Scruple (\f7rro,') . . . excellence (xpvf^araV 

8. iinless like some prudent goddess she detemines 
(aorist) 

9. use and thanks, the glory of the lender (partic.).' 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



Exercise 4 (a). 



11 



A little onward lend thy guiding hand 
To these dark steps, a little fmther on : 
For yonder bank hath choice of sun or shade ; 
There am I wont to sit, when any chance 
Relieves me fi-om my task of servile toil. 
Daily in the common prison else enjoined me ; 
^^^le^e I, a piisoner chained, scarce freely draw 
The air imprisoned also, close and damp. 
Unwholesome draught. But here I feel amends, 
The bi-eath of heaven fi^Cwsh blowing, pure and sweety 
With diiy-si)ring born : hei-e leave me to respire. 

1. 'Guiding.' -rro^in^oq. lu rcVror, orthelike, may 
.be inserted in one of the first two lines. 

3. * For there, I ween, the duKoc has either shade, 

4. or pleasant warmth : here I am wont (<|>tXw), 

5. 6. if chance shall have fi-eed me flavavam' 
irovtav which I bejir daily 

7. in prison (£<p*:ra7c), whei-e bound (ivyetc) in 

chains, 

8. 9. I scai-cely draw the breezes impiisoned also 
(^ui'oiicoc), and the xyiyrjpov bi-eath of damp air and 
unwholesome (yvaov ftpvm^). 

10. 11. Here, however, a godlike wind sweet IXit^ 
rryon makes amends (r/vct iroivag) for the evils 
12. appearing tutOer : set me down hei-e.' 



Exercise 4 (6). 

This day a solemn feast the i)eople hold 
To Dagon theii* sea-idol, and forbid 



r--+* . 



12 



EXERCISES IN THE COMTOSITION OF 



Lalx)rious works — unwillingly this I'est 
Their snpei-stition yields me — hence, vnth leave 
Retiring from theii* popular noise, I seek 
This unfi*equente(l place to find some ease, — 
Ease to the body some, none to the mind 
From i-estless thought*?, that like a dojidly swarm 
Of hornets armed, no sooner found alone, 
But riLsh ujwn me thi-onging, and present 
Times pist, what once I was and what am now. 

I. * On this day the iravcrjfioc Xtwc 

(2. 3. and part of 4.) holds {cait^vcri) feast, (fcc. 
. . . and oi-ders (aonst) cessation of . . . toils to all, 

(i'est of 4. 5.) unwilling giving rest to me also Oeutv 
Ik-aTi, Whei-efore now 

6. I seek leisui'e away fi*om men, 

7. 8. if I can Ugh ten (aor. subj.) my body ; but ' 
my spirit the £7rt<Tr/)o<^«t of myrLid annoyances giieve, 

9. which Uke wasps, if I chance to be alone, 

10. sting me, my present (TrapevTuKrar) fortune 

II. 12. when I compare (participle) with the 
former and [think] fi-om what [state] fallen with what 
calamities 1 am oppi-essed (iXavyofxai).* 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 13 

Or benefit revealed to Abraham's race. 
Why was my breeding ordered and prescinbed 
As of a pei*son separate to Grod, 
Designed for gi-eat exploits, if I must die 
Beti-ayed, captived, and both my eyes put out, 
Made of my enemies the scorn and gaze, 
To gi'ind in bmzen fetters under task 
With this heaven-gifted strength 1 

I. and part of 2. * Why did godlike hei-ald foretell 
my birth twice and not once 1 

3. ascended, nWip* elai^v, 

4. rapt in fiery blasts away from 

5. the altar burning with tfnrvpa, aloft, 

6. riding (oxov/itvot) on rays like a God, leaving 

7. some great benefit to mortals ; and why 

8. did he thus prescribe my TraicEvtriQ 

9. as of one bix)ught up and consecrated to God 

10. for great deeds, if I must die bUnd 

II. <kc. . . . &c., a laughing-stock to enemies 

12. 13. 14. and a pleasant spectacle, how weighed 
down with brazen chains at the mill I disgi'ace my 
godhke sti-ength with (popriKoq labour 1 ' 



Exercise 4 (c). 

wherefoi-e was my birth from Heaven foretold 

Twice by an angel 1 who at last in sight 

Of both my pai'ents all in flames ascended 

From off the altai-, where an offeiing burned. 

As in a fiery column charioting 

His godlike pi-esence, and fix)m some great act 



Exercise 4 (d), 

glorious strength 
Put to the labour of a beast, debased 
Lower than bond-slave ! Pi-omise was that I 
Should Israel from PliiHstine yoke deliver. 
Ask for this great delivei-er now, and find him 
Eyeless in Gaza, at the mill with slaves, 



, ■•.•'.K'-ir,.- 



. {i.--j."A.v.:I^i.- --saaaawfertlilirf' f 



"' '^^MMSk&:^4 ^v: -tf i&fei 



;-r; -^A^^^^l&^fe^k: 



. ii 



14 



EXEKCISES IN THE COMTOSITION OF 



Himself in bonds under Philistian yoke.— 
Yet stay, let me not nushly call in doubt 
Divine prediction. What if iUl foretold 
Had been fulfilled but through mine own default ! 
Whom have I to complain of but m3rself 1 
Who, this high gift of strength committed to me, 
In what pai-t lodged, how ej^sily bereft me, 
Under the seal of silence could not keep, 
But weakly to a woman must reveal it, 
O'ercome with importimity and teai-s. Milton, 

1-4. *0 glorious Ixxiy how thou fulfiUest (ai^Xdi) 
Labours of a liejvst, a lot woi-se thim slaves ! Did not a 
rei)ort once come to me de6diy that I should fi'ee my 
race from suffering ill vtt' Ix'^pCiy'i * (*Fi"om suffeiing,* 
same construction as after verbs of hindrance.) 

5. 6. 7. * And now ye see me, the gi'eat deliverer, 
'nindinir, «kc. ... in Gaza, bound a captive with 

othei* slaves. 

8. 9. Yet what say 1 1 how ought I with daring 
mind to question (cXt'yx"*') theuneriing prophecies of 
God; 

10. 11. for they are ^wiTa and would have found 
a destined end, if rov^oy had not fi\iled {(r<pa\\ofiai) 1 

12. Who shai-es with me the blame of this? 

13-17. who, rtfjuor the holy gift of strength, 
which had (partic.) such a position and [was] an 
&yp€vfia ipavXov to enemies, defile the oma dEVfia of 
silence, and betray [it] weakly to a woman, conquered 
by tears and supplication.' 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



Exercise 5. 



15 



Even to the utmost I have been to thee 

A kind and a good father; and herein 

I but i^pay a gift which I myself 

Received at other hands ; for, though now old 

Beyond the common life of man, I still 

Remember them who loved me in my youth. 

Both of them sleep together ; here they lived 

As all their forefathers had done ; and when 

At length their time was come, they wei-e not loth 

To give their bodies to the family mould. 

I wish tliiit thou should'st live the life they lived. 

Take the English as far as 'received at other 
hands ' for the first three lines ; ' repaying a gift,' vxovp- 
yijaac xapiy, uvirtp k. t, X. For the next thi-ee lines, 
as far as * in my youth '; for * beyond the common life,' 
say older y Kara, * I i-emember it; roaoyce y tifiepac ' ; 
* loved ' (dual ; use (rrepyw). 

7. ' They sleep, being two, in the same bed. 

8. Here they dwelt where their yeyyijTopeg did. 

9. And when the time came to end life 

10. they delayed not (oKyiu,) the destiny of Trarp^oc 

11. Thus I wished (impf.) thee also fiiufvaiJ 



Exercise 6. 



Hark ! in the trembling leaves 
Mysteiious whispers : hark ! a rushing sound 



.:M 



i 



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t I 



h;« 






Jf.fS 



Ait 



A^wifeAfetaifej 



a^OS,. 



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16 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



17 



Sweeps through yon twilight depth : e'en now they 

come, 

They thiong to greet their guest ! And who ai-e they 

Rejoicing efich with each in stately joy, 

As a king's children gathered for the hour 

Of some high festival 1 Exultbigly 

And kindred-like, and godlike, on they pass, 

The glorious wandering shapes ! Aged and young, 

Pi-oud men and royal women ! Lo my race, 

My sire's ancestral i*ace ! 

Uemans (from Goetlie), 

1. * What voice's munnui' rustles in the lx)ughs ? 

2. the breathings of wliat sounds in the shadow ] 

3. They have come to see the iniiXvceC' 

4 . 5. Wliat TidtQ fail' to see comes like (e/i^f pr/c) a 
com])any of venerable kings 1 

6. 7. 8. Boys, old men, men mingled with women, 
like one another and the gods too, approach : but now I 
perceive (voJi) 

9. they are the apxnytrai of our i-ace/ 



Exercise 7. 

I well i*emember too (for I was pi-esent) 
When in a secret and dead hour of night. 
Due sacrifice performed with barbaroas rites 
Of muttei-ed chaims and solemn invocsition. 
You made the !Magi call the dreadful powei-s 
That i-ead futurity, to know the fate 
Impending o'er youi' son : their answer was 
' If the son I'eign, the mother perishes.* 
* Perish,' you cried, * the mother — reign the son ! ' 



He reigns, the rast is Heaven's ; who oft has bade. 
Even when its will seemed \NTote in hues of blood, 
The unthought event disclose a whiter meaning, 

Grai/. 
A woman is speiiking. 

1. 'I happened to be present, and remember 
(fir ft ay tx***) 

2. how once uwpovvKrni: secretly in darkness 

3. you sacrificed, as is customaiy among barbarians, 

4. muttering a song, using solemn Xirai, 

5. 6. 7. and raised up tlie Magi to call the dread 
^a//ioi'fc, who know the future, to disclose to you the 
fate near your chiUl ; and their word was, 

8. 'tl** fated that the mother perishes, if the child 
reigns (partic). 

9. Let the mother perish, you said ; let the child 



reign. 



10. He reigns — and the rest is a care to the gods, 

11. who often bid (aorist), when in blood 

12. 13. they seemed to write the tablet, an un- 
expected (TvfKftopu to mean (()i\€iy) something (aWa) 
whiter.' 



Exercise 8. 



Ye elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes and gi-oves; 
And ye that on the sands with printless foot 
Do chase the ebbing Neptune, and do fly him 
When he comes back ; you demi-puppets that 
By moon.shine do the gi-een sour ringlets make, 
Whei-eof the ewe not bites ; and you, whose pastime 
Is to make midnight musln-ooms, that rejoice 

c 



I 



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ifv-.-%t" 



iSiJisa** 



xy';^n.-:':?r,xrS'i4t\:'^-€^ 



18 



EXERCIisES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC TERSE. 



19 



To hear the solemn curfew ; by whose aid, 
"Weak mastei-s though ye be, 1 have Ix^liinm'd 
The noon-tide sun, called foiih the mutinous winds, 
And 'twixt the gi-een sea and the azui-ed vault 
Set roarinsf war: to the dread nittling thunder 
Have 1 given tire, and rifted Jove's stout oak 
With his own }x>\t: the strong-based promontory 
Have I made shake, and by the sjmrs plucked up 
The pine and ce<lar : grjives at my command 
Have waked their sleepers, oped and let 'em fortli 
By my so potent ai-t. Shakspearp. 

1 — caesura of 5. * Htiil, all n^mplLs of hilLs, <kc. . . . 
and all who TrapuKTtai with uncertain tracks pm*sue 
the flight of the sea god, then in the ivicpfn*) of the 
tide, fly vaXiaovrov — 

(Rest of 5. 6. 7.) w rvTruifium of shapeless shapes, 
which dance round {vfpi^opiviM)) when the moon shines 
the circles of the meadows, ivQakiiQ 

(8. 9. half of 10.) and untouched by flocks (genitive) 
and sport as-ye-make (particip. cV-Trorw) midnight 
fiVKTjrec^ pleased with the sound of evening kut^wy ; 

(Rest of 10. 11. 12.) having the aid of whom, 
though of-youi-selves ye avail (partic. jcparui) nought, 
I made Phoobus iTapyi^uQ of noon-day light, 

(13. 14. half of 15.) and i-aising strife of winds, 
I set up loud-roaring contention l:)etween the kvuvw^ 
TToXoc and the gi'ey sea ; 

(Rest of 15. 16. 17.) and to the virfprovoi fipovral 
1 gave flame, and split-asun<ler deeply-rooted oaks 
with the avToyii^rijrov bolt of Zeus, 

18. 19. 20. 21. and shook the foundations of 
promontories, and 7r/i£/ijo0£r together toi-e-up the pine 



and cedar ; and at my command the tomb raised up 
the dead, and, opened (pf. pai-t. with synizesis) by 
my incantations, sent [them] forth (eEavirjfn).' 



Exercise 9. 

How use dot)) bi*eed a habit in a man ! 
These 8hado\N^, dasert, unfrequented woods 
I better brook than flourishing peopled touTis : 
Here can I sit alone unseen of any. 
And to tlie nightingale's complaining notes 
Tune my disti-esses and record my woes. 
O thou that dost inluvbit in my brejist, 
Leave not the mansion so long tenantless. 
Lest, growing ruinous, the building fall. 
And leave no memory of what it was ! 
Repair me with they presence, Silvia ; 
Thou gentle nymph, cherish thy forlorn swain ! 

S/iakspeare, 

Translate this exactly line for line. 

I. * TO ^vyi)de.z breeds vofiovg,* 

3. tvai'Cpoi TToXeir. 

4. Unseen of any, aTOTrroc 6fjjjiuT<t)y* 
6. I sing (TVfi(i)(jjy()£y itc. 

9. * liest it perish irptfivoOev becoming rotten, 

10. and all pi-oof of its former existence (pai-tic.) 
be annihilated (uiffrut),' 

II. repair, Kov<pii;w. Insert 2<X/3m in last line. 



c 2 



iii^kiA^'^t^^^jArii'. 



lilBliliiii^^^Sli^liii 



3®^^^S!^:JrS.»--'" -SB 



' '''IS^aSwfif *:| '" •'! V. 






^^^PRpf^^^*^^^^^^^^^ 



20 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



Exercise 10. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



2\ 



Life, lile, my father, 
My venerable father, life has charms 
Which we have ne'er experienced. We have been 
But voyaging along its barren coasts, 
Like some poor ever-roaming horde of pii-ates, 
That, cix)\vded in the rank and narrow sliip. 
House on the wild sea with wihl usages. 
Nor know ought of the mainland but the bays 
Where safeliest they may ventui'e a thieves landing. 
Whate'er in the inland dales the land conceals 
Of fair and exqiiLsite, O ! nothing, nothing 
Do we ])ehold of that in our rude voyage. 

Coleridge {from Schiller), 

1. 2. and half of 3. ^Tl ' ire to life, father, 
venemble father (^arpoc <T£pac), tliere are sweet 
things to life of which life distributes not among us a 

share. 

(Rest of 3. 4.) To us was only a voyage along a 
barren sea shoi'e, 

5. as some poor company of pii-ates wandere 

6. who, ffvtrrpatpiyTEQ in their dirty narrow ship, 

7. live wihlly upon the wild sea, 

8. 9. knowing no mainland except in what bays 
(oTTou «:o\7ru>>') they may disembark most sjifely. 

10. 11. 12. But all that the land hides (aorist) 
within dales, plciisant and most beautiful, we saw 
nothing, nothing at all, while sailing, [we] a hard race.' 



Exercise 11 (a). 

Comus. What chance, good lady, hath bereft you thus ? 

L(uhj. Dim darkness and this leafy labyrinth. 

C, Could that divide you from near-ushering guides? 

L. They left me weaiy on a gi'assy turf. 

6\ By f{ilseho<)d, or discourtesy, or why % 

L. To seek i' the valley some cool friendly spring. 

(J, And left your fair side all imguarded, lady 1 

L. They were but twain, and promised to return. 

C, Perhaps forestalling night prevented them. 

L, How easy my misfortune is to hit ! 

C, \m\)Ovij^ their loss, beside the present need ? 

L, No less than if I should my brothei-s lose. 

C, Wei-e they of manly prime, or youthful bloom ? 

L, As smooth :us Heine's their uni-azored li])s. 

1. Bereft, epr/^oa>. 

2. CvaTTopoi iloi, 

3. Di\4de, rofrcpii^u) : near-ushering, 7r\»/<r<oi. 

5. * Do you speak of some craft, or TpoTrui q>peyun i' 

7. Unguarded, a(})fjakroQ, 

8. ' But being two, they said they would be-here 
(»/kw) immediately.' 

10. Easy to hit, tvjiadtiQ ri/)(£Ti'. 

11. * Dost thou regret them {(T(pe) moi-e than tliis 
need) 

12. Yes (ye), so much as if, itc. 

13. [Were they] iifiwrreQ or flom*ishing in the 
prime of manhood 1 

15. [Their] lip untouched of razor to behold, like 
Hebe's.' 



1^ 



-I. 



■■a.' '. 



"<^i 






99 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GllEEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



23 



Exercise 11 (6). 

C*. Two such I saw, what time the laboured ox 
In his loose traces from the furrow came, 
Aud the swmked hedger at his supper sat ; 
I saw them under a gi-een mantling vine 
That ci-awls along the side of yon small hill, 
Plucking ripe clusters from the tender shoots : 
Their i)ort was moi'e than luiman as they stood ; 
I took it for a fairy vision 
Of some gay creatures of the clement, 
That in the coloui-s of the i-ainbow live, 
And play i* the plighted clouds. I was awe-struck, 
And as I passed, I woi^shipped. If those you seek, 
It wei-e a journey like the psith to heaven 
To lielp you find them. Milton. 

1.2.* Two-such I saw when the oxen .set fi-ee 
(aviiiijn) from the rein were pi*oceeding homeward 
from the field, 

3. and the yewpyoc sat supping after (U) labour : 

4. I saw them under the shade of gi*een vine 

5. which thou seest creei)iiig, tkc, 
fi. plucking {Kap7rovfiat)f &c. ; 

7. more tlrnn human (ov Kar ayOfxjjirop') 

8. 9. I thought (cXtti^;^!!/) to see a di\ane vision of 
blight TTpotrtoKa in the dwellings of the sky, 

(10. 11. and part of 12.) playing within the tou/X- 
rfora of Iris, dwelling-in the folds of clouds : and 
astonished and worshipping I passed by. 

(Part of 12. 13. 14.) If you miss these, I would go 
rejoicing as to the dwellings of he^iven Kara l,iiTi\aiv of 
these, dejir la^ly.* 



Exercise 12. 

Miriam. And thou canst speak thus with a stedfast 
voice, 
When in one hour may death have laid in the 

dust 
Those breathing, moving, valiant multitudes ? 

Solom. And thou ! oh thou, that movest to the battle 
Even like the mountain stag to the running 

river. 
Pause, pause, that I may gaze my fill. 

M, Our father ! 

Salone, is't oiu* father that thou seest 1 

S. Lo ! lo ! the war hath broken oif to admire lum ! 
The glory of his presence awes the conflict. 
The son of Ca?sar on his armed steed 
Rises, impatient of the plumed helms 
That from his sight conceal yoimg Amariah I 

M. Alas ! what means she I Hear me yet a word ! 
I will retui'n or e'er the wounded men 
Require our soft and healing hands to soothe them. 
Thou'lt not forget, Siilone — if thou seest 
Our father in the fearful liour of peril, 
Lift up thy hands and pray. Milman. 

1 . 2. 3. 4. * Dost thou diii-e from an arpecTToy uTOfxci to 
utter this, when in a moment's po-m) detith might be 
able to mingle with this dust the living {t^'^vxoc), 
eager and quickly-moving (aioKoq) crowd of men % 

5. 6. 7. And oh thou (masculine) who iiishing- 
forth prooeedest to battle, as an opeifSdrric stag longs 
for the stream, stay {iTrix'^) that I may be filled with 
the sight 1 






1 












•i'~' 



r*^-; 






24 



EXEKCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC TERSE. 



25 



8. Seest thou our (a/ioc) fjitlier, dear sister ? 

9. Kai /i»/>' the host stantUng-apart has won(lei*C(l 
(see Inti*oiluctoiy Remarks, S}iitjix 3). 

10. for the light of [his] pi-e.sence awes (aor. ik- 
TrXiiffffw) Ares. 

11. 12. 13. And standing up on his armed horse 
the king is-vexed-with (cvacpopw) the shady crests, 
which pi-event (piulic.) him from seeing valijint 
Amphiou. 

14. Alas, what is this word 1 hut hear me. 

15. 16. I will return l)eft)i*e the wounded reijuire 
TTfWQ yfjiwy a heaUng light-hand ; 

17. IS. 19. and let it be thy care, if ever thou 
seest the father in danger (see Introductory Remarks, 
Syntax 4), to supplicjite the hen ven-d welling gods >vith 
upliftings of hands.' 



Exercise 13. 

It mast be : 
And yet it moves me, Romans ! it confounds 
The counsels of my firm philosophy, 
Tliat Ruin's merciless |)loughshare must j>as8 o'er, 
And Imrren salt be sown on yon proud city. 
As on our olive-crowned hill we stand, 
WTiere Kedron at oui' feet its scsmty waters 
Distils from stone to stone >\4th gentle motion, 
As through a valley sacre<l to sweet {>eace, 
How boldly doth it front us, how mnjestiailly ! 
Like a luxurious vineyai-d, the hill side 
Is hung with marble fabiics, line o'er line, 
Terrace o'er ten*ace, nearer still, and nearer 
To the blue heavens. MUrnan. 



1. * This is decided (nfiapi) and there is no-longer a 
tuming-biick. 

2. And yet, dear Romans, this thought 

3. 4. moves, disturbs my heart and seems to 
confound the law of tilings long-ago Itcoy^iva, 

5. 6. 7. that Ruin's, kc. . . . should destroy this 
lofty-towered city, and uj)on these ifidwia salt be sown, 
a fi'uitless seed/ 

8-12. The next/(w^r lines of the English. A hill 
Trepitrrecpfit: >\nth olives — Kecpiby with smjill streams 
passes-over the stones Ka\\ui^u)i' — watermg a valley 
KaBieptt)fjii't}y with pejice, <fec. . . . 

13. 14. 15. *How loftily, *fcc. . . . the fronting 
(ai'riTTpufpog) appearance shows, and like liixuriant 
("/Vof) vines, the whole hill-side slope {kXitvq) glitters 
with hanging dwellings, 

16. 17. 18. and more and more the luxuiy of 
kingly roofs, one after another filled-up in succession, 
luises its head tower- wise into the depth of sky.' 



Exercise 14. 

And Phaethon they found, or what seemed he. 
Low lying in the reeds, a chaired black mass, 
FuriY)w'd with trenchant hi-e from head to foot. 
Whom yet with reverent hands they lifted up 
And bare him to the Imnk, and wash'd the limbs 
In vain ; and, for the burnt shreds cHnging to liim, 
Robed the cold form in raiment shining white. 
Then on the river-marge they scooped a giuve 
And laid him in the dank earth far apart. 
Near to none else ; for so the dead are laid 



^ 



V 






26 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



Whom Zeus, the Thundei-er, hath cut off by fire. 
And on the tomb tliey poured fortli wine and oil. 
Nor faile<l they to i-ecoixi in «Ustich due 
How from a kingly ventm-e kingly fall 
Resultetl, and a higlier than human fiime. 

Wordey. 

1. *0r what seemed he (say, "nay rather a ghost 
of a mjin ") 

2. was fouutl in middle of reeds on-the-gi-ound, 

3. above and l)elow all with the hiuvTaiov f^iXoq 

4. alitjjidy bkckened and calcined. 

5. 6. Nevertheless in revei-ent hands to the bank 
they raised his form, vain /3(Way/ia, having-washed 
(fem.) it in vain, 

7. 8. and clad cold limbs in white robes instead of 
i-ags with which he is suiToimded (use relative attmc- 
tion). 

(9. 10. 11. and half of 12.) And they dig, <fec. . . . 
and in moist gix)mid hide far off, separate from others, 
the isolated {^oi'6i,vi) corpse ; 

(i-est of 12. 13.) for thus is law to bury, «fec. . . . 
(Five more line^ for the rest.) Gifts and (fmru/iptot 
X"«i, (k;. . . . ; nor failed they, itc. . . . ovk afiffrayrai 
TO fit) (w — kingly venture, Tvpayya roX/iwi.' 



Exercise 15. 

Still stJinds the foi-est primeval ; but far away from its 
shadow 

Side by side, in their nameless graves, the lovei-s are 
sleeping : 

Under the humble walls of the little Catholic church- 
yai'd, 



%' *■'■*-/%_, 



p^-<;t>Sn'^-^^'j 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



27 



In the heart of the city, they lie unknown and un- 
noticed. 

Daily the tides of life go ebbing and flowing beside 

them : 
Thousands of tlirobbing hearts, where theii-s are at rest 

and for ever — 

Thousiinds of aching bi'aiiLs, where theirs no longer are 
busy — 

Thousands of toiling hands, where theii's have ceased 

from their labours — 
Thousands of weai-y feet, where theirs liave completed 

their journey ! Longfelloio. 

1. * Up to this day stands the ancient forest, 

2. 3. 4. but afar those-two who had a common 
love sleep Xay/nrtq a common sleep not overshadowed 
by boughs neju* one another in nameless graves ; 

(5. 6. and part of 7.) imkno>NTi, imnoticed in middle 
of city lies the pair {ivnofit^) enclosed in small Trcp/- 
fio\oQ of the P€kpoCiyfHiH' totto*:. 

(Rest of 7. 8-11.) Daily as in ebb and flow {^lavXot 
oi' waves) citizens fi-equent it in a tide, and the 
heart of ten thousiind throlxs ; but meanwhile to these 
for ever thei-e is forgetfidness and rest from evils. 

1 2. Cai-e troubles many, 

13. but to these is i-est and alleviation of toil; 

U. to many labour (xetp epyartc), but to these 
i-efreshment ; 

15. 16. where [are] countless feet, subdued by 
toil, there these complete a long life.* (See Soph. 
0. C\ 91.) 



'i&il:,.. 



28 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



29 



Exercise 16. 

Jla-ald. There now they i-est ; but me the king bade 
hear 
(jrood tidings to rejoice this town smd thee. 

Alt/uea. Laud ye the gods : for this they have given is 
good, 
And what shall >)ethey hide until their time; 
Much good and somewhat giievous hast thou said, 
And either well : but let all sad things be, 
Till all have made befoi-e the prosperous gods 
Burnt offering, and poured out the floral wine. 
Jjook fair, gods, and favourable ; for we 
Praise you with no false heart or flattering mouth, 
Being merciful, but with pure soul and pmyer. 

J/. Thou hast pmyed well • for whoso fears not these 
But once l>eing prosperous waxOvS huge of heait : 
Him shall some new thing unaware destroy. 

Sioinhiirne. 

1. 2. As in English : remember the word euciy- 
yfXoc. 

3. To give, TropiTvvu), 

4. What shall be, to fajpaifiov, 

5. Grievous, Xtnrrjpw^ i^xof. 

6. Let be, \aipirw. 

7. 8. * Before all bui-n sacrifices l)eforo the gods 
that give well, and pour out the ycii'oc of the vine, 

9-12. 'Look brightly (adj.), Jcc. ... for with un- 
rtattenng (adwirevror) tongues and from unlying minds 
we iirev(l>yfiov^ey, but with pure prayers and souls, 
l»eing thus merciful.' 

The i^t literally : ' waxes huge of heart, oyKovfiai.* 



Exercise 17. 
Once did she hold the goi-geous East in fee, 
And was the lifeguard of the West : the worth 
Of Venice did not fall below her birth, 
Venice the eldest child of liberty. 
She was a maiden city, bright and free ; 
No guile seduceil, no force could violate ; 
And when she took unto hei-self a mate. 
She must espouse the everlfusting sea. 
And what if she had seen those gloiies fade, 
Those titles vanish, and that strength decay; 
Yet shall some tribute of regret l>e paid. 
When her long life hath reached its final day ; 
Men are we, and mast grieve when even the shatle 
Of that wliich once w^as gi-eat is pa^ssed away. 

Wonhwort/i. 
L 2. ' Queen of Asia the golden once she was and 
Trfwaranic of the places Trpt)^ "Etnripavy 

3. for being eldest child of liberty, 

4. she disgi-jiced not by deeds her brillmnt race 

5. free, a^v£, ' 

6. untouched by tiicks (Soph. 0,C. 1147), nor to- 
be-taken (verbal of aXhkofini) by plunder ; 

7. 8. thei-e was no other huslmnd «rW the ever- 
flowing sea, when she came to perfect wedlock, 

9. fade (participle of avairw), 

10. vanish, deciiy (participles); 

11. however (y, ^,)r), it is right to pav some share 
of regret, 

12. when her long tutvXac is being mea^sured out 

13. U. It behoves mortals lx)rn, when even the! 
shadow of former biiUiancy is gone, to mourn ' 



«5i 

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30 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



Exercise 18. 

I liave sent to seek him, and to find the body. 

How dangci*ous is it tliat this man goes loose ! 

Yet must not be put the strong law on liim : 

He's loved of the distmcted multitude, 

Who like not in their judgment, but their eyes : 

And where 'tis so, the offenders scourge is weighed, 

But never the offence. To bear all smooth and even. 

This sudden sending him away must seem 

DclilxM-att' pause : diseases desperate gi-own 

By desperate appliance are relieved, 

Or not at all. Shakspeare, 

1. *I have sent (aorist) to fetch (/ifra) the corpw' 
and him. 

2. This man is no longer siife when loose (pai-tic. 

3. yet must we not i-estrain him by sti-ength of 
law ; 

4. 5. being a friend of the light-minded people, 
who ai« wont to judge Kar o/Li/i«, and not accoi-ding 
to judgment. 

6. 7. And since [things] are so they reckon well 
the liKai of the i-eceiver, not of the giver ; 

(Next four lines) and in order that all may be quiet 
it is right that this, kc. . . . «kc. . . . deliberate pause 
{yvto^iT} TraXaia) — despei^ate, (ifii)\avoQ.* 



ExEKciSE 10 (a), 

O pardon me, my liege ! but for my tears, 
The moist imi>ediments unto my speech. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 31 

I had forestalled this dear and deep rebuke, 
Ere you with grief had sjwke, and I had heard 
The course of it so far. There is your crown ; 
And He that wears the crown immortally 
Long guard it yoiu^ ! If I affect it more 
Than as your honour and as your renown, 

Let me no more from this ol^edience rise 

AVliich my most inward true and duteous spirit 
Teacheth— this prostrate and exterior bendin</ ! 

1-5. * Pardon me this, unless the tears, <fec. . . . 
had restrained me, I should have anticipated the^ 

uttering (UflaWu,), &c grief both to thee to 

speak and to me to he^- ; receive this thy sceptre ; 

6. 7. and may He who wields (rw/zd)), etc. [ . . 
guard this lawful yipciQ long for thee. 

8. 9. And if I long for it more than £>' ^jtrov 
belongs to your honoui- and established (viJ^(oc) <^ood- 
fame, ^ 

10. (literal), 

11. 12. which yvrjfTla tftvanc within taught me, 
thus £^u; falling ecpay x^f^^^^^^V-' 



Exercise 19 (h). 

God witness with me, when I here came in. 

And found no course of breath ^vithin your majesty, 

How cold it struck my heart ! If I do feign, 

O let me in my present wildness die, 

And never live to show th' incredulous world 

The noble change that I have pui-posed I 

Coming to look on you, thinking you dead, 



''¥iz.i *. 



t'hJftAai^tafajffla^ai^aaali " 



' ^t^SS^^WrW^ ' >■■' S* * 4 '^1 fl" *Ji:*«tfS*«*f ls¥*i|fs* S^^ 



'S^'S 



32 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOJJITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



33 



ff- 



And dead almost, my liege, to think you were, — 
I spake unto the crown as having sense, 
And thas upbraided it : * The care on thee depend- 
ing 
Hath fed upon the lx)dy of my father ; 
Thei'eforo thou, best of gold, ai-e worst of gold.' 

Shaks2)e(ire. 

1-4. * Zfvc tvi'ioTuip^ when having-come hither J 
saw thee no longer Ix^ing t/iirrrvc, how gieat a cold 
was fixed in my heart : if 1 lie in this, may I die 
abiiling in my present (koor/i/n, 

5. 6. not li\dng so as to show to incredulous 
mortiils how KaWUiKoQ a change I promise ! 

7-10. Looking on (KapuloKibi') thee, seeming to see 
thee dead, and seeming I was myself found half-dead, 
I address the sceptre as an tfjKpmov [jierson], fashioning 
words and reproaching a-s follows : 

11. 12. 13. " All the aire that has dwelt^with thv 
fortunes has drunk my father's l)lood, whei-eforo 
thou, gold, utf6ijc to me counterfeit, although being 
most beautiful." ' 



A. What if they give us poisonous drinks for wine ? 
Ch. They have theii- will ; much talking mends it 

not. 
A. And gixll for milk, and cursing for a prayer 1 
Ch. Have they not given life and the end of life ? 

Swinhunve, 

1. 2. 3. Turned into a fire ;— say, 'changed as a 
fire : * stuff- that kindles it—' iXr^ by which it shall 
be nourished.' 

4. Being-patient — KapTepQy. 

6. Find out some herb for it — kvri^vovfji rt, 

7. Yes, with such a drug as vuaoi the blood moi-e. 

8. Having sufiered what art thou jealous of what 
they do 1 

9. Poisonous diinks — trie. 

10. Much talking kc. ... say, 'and there is no 
need of words.' 

11. Pi-ayer — eu^wX^/. 

12. Have they not given ? (present tense). 



Exercise 20. 

Ak/ufa, Look ye say well and know not wliat ye say. 
For all my sleep is turned into a fire 
And all my di-eams to stuff that kindle it. 

( 'hoims. Yet one doth well being patient of the gods. 

A* Yea, lest they smite us with some fourfoot plague. 

Ch. But when time spi'esuis find out some her!) for it. 

J. And with their hejiling herbs infect our blood. 

Ch. Wliat ails thee to be jealous of theii* ways ? 



Exercise 21. 

Whftte'er is hmnan, to the human beiog 
Do I allow ; and to the vehement 
And striving spuit i-eadily I pardon 
The excess of action. But to thee, my general. 
Above all others make I large concession. 
For thou must move a world, and be the master- 
He kills thee who condemns thee to inaction. 
So be it then ! maintain thee in thy post 
By violence. Resist the emperor, 

D 



m 



^%^3^ 



i-^i^^os^:. 












,f-t** 



34 



EXERCISES m THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



35 



And, if it must be, force with force repel : 
I will not praise it, but I can forgive it. 

1. 2. 3. * I grant to mortals all human things, but 
for daring and striving (dpntrrtuHoc) spirits I have 
excuse, if they labour too much (frepiartTov), 

4. 5. And to thee of all, O general, very much 
must be granted, such-as would not [be] to others/ 

6. Move the world — 7rd»' fioxXivaai. 

7. * He shall kill thee whoever shall link thy life to 
idleness.' 

In the next four lines observe : thy post * the rank 
which thou hapi)enest to have by lot ' : if it must be 
^kc. . . . ^ utQ h) about to overcome, if it is fitting, force 
by force.' 



Exercise 22. 



mother, hear me yet before I die ! 
Hear me, Earth ! I wiU not die alone. 
Lest their shrill happy lau<;liter come to me 
Walking the cold and stailess path of Death 
Uncomforted, leaving my ancient love 
With the Greek woman. I will rise and go 
Down into Troy, and, ere the stars come forth, 
Talk with the wild Cassandra, for she says 
A tire dances before her, and a sound 
Rings ever in her ears of armed men. 
What this may be I know not ; but I know 
That wheresoe'er I am, by night and day. 
All earth and air seem only burning fire. 

Tennyson, 

1. 2. 3. Literally. Use Tt6yt)lofiaL for * I will die.* 



4. 5. 6. ' When I creep [along] the cold &c. . . . 
of the dead, wanting comfoi-ters, leaving (fee. . . . with 
the Pelasgic woman. 

7. 8. 9. a\\* (loy I will 'rise and go down to 
Troy, and before the stars come foi-th {rpoflaivu)) con- 
verse {ivva-KTO^ai Xoyoio) with the (ppeyofiXafitiQ, I 
mean Cassandra. 

9. 10. Rings in her ears— /laWftr hi* &TUiv. 

11. 12. 13. I know not what this is, but I know 
nevertheless, wherever I am &c. . . ., sky and earth 
seem (tdngular) all ■KafK^XiKTov.'' 



Exercise 23. 

Hold thy desperate hand : 
Art thou a man ? Thy form cries out thou art ; 
Thy teara are womanish ; thy wild acts denote 
The unreasonable fury of a beast : 
Unseemly woman in a seeming man ! 
Or ill-beseeming beast in seeming both I 
Thou hast amazed me ; by my holy order, 
I thought thy disposition l)etter tempered. 
Hast thou slain Tybalt? wilt thou slay thyself 1 
And slay thy lady too that lives in thee, 
By doing damned hate upon thyself? 
Why rail'st thou on thy birth, the heaven, and earth 1 
Since birth, and heaven, and earth, all thi-ee do meet 
In thee at once ; which thou at once would'st lose. 
Pie, fie, thou sham'st thy shape, thy love, thy wit. 

Shakspeare, 

1. */ijr) Ifira, hold this i-aging hand. 

2. Thy form accuses thee of being (participle) a man. 

D 2 



I 






~r5^*^ 



« t ••" * « 






36 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



3. 4. thy teal's [of being] a woman, and savage 
actions show the senseless Xhtrrra of an evil beast. 

5. What art thou] a yvyaioy wearing manly 
appearance, 

0. or animal disgracefully showing a double 
nature 1 

7. 8. How thou didst astonish me! I would be 
willing to swear that thou hast a disposition moi'e 
temperate than this. 

9. Having slain Tybalt, then &c. 

10. 11. And wilt thou destroy the wife living in 
thee, committing (cognate word) most hateful outrage 
against thvself ? 

12. Thou abusest thy bii-th <kc, 

13. 14. But heaven &c. . . . and biith in the 
third place (rp/rov) meet in thee — thou rejectest all at 
once. 

15. Wit, rove.' 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



37 



Exercise 24. 

And with a gi'ave mild voice Sohrab I'cplied : — 
* Desire not that, my father : thou must live. 
For some ai-e bom to do great deeds, and live, 
As some are lx)rn to be obscured, and die. 
Do thou the deeds I die too young to do, 
And rei\p a second gloiy in thine age. 
But cany me with thee to »Seistan, 
And place me on a l)ed, and mourn for me ; 
And thou must lay me in that lovely earth, 
And keep a stately mound above my bones, 
And plant a far-seen pillar over all : 



That so the passing hoi-seman on the waste 
May see my tomb a great way off, and say— 
' Sohrab, the mighty Rustum's son, Hes there, 
Whom his great father did in ignorance kill '— 
And I be not forgotten in my gi-ave. M. Arnold, 
1. 2. Litemlly. 

3. 4. * Some brilliant deeds and life await, others 
obscurity and darkness of tomb. 

5. 6. 7. Do thou then such things as it is im- 
possible for me, dying yoimger, to do ; for a second 
summer of glory awaits thee old abeady.' 

8. 9. Literal ; use imperative. 

10-14. ' Lay me ui—Kp^cu to.' Use hi hei-e for 
' must,' and put the succeeding verbs in aor. infin. 

15. 16. 17. * There is-buried (jDerf) the son of 
valiant father, whom etc ; and I shall Hve illus- 
trious though dead.' 



Exercise 25. 
Polynices, altares of my country soile. 
Eteocles. Whom thou ai-t come to spoile and to deface. 
P. gods, give eare unto my honest cause. 
E. With foi-en power his coimtiie to invade. 
P. holy temples of the heavenly gods. 
E. That for thy wicked deeds do hate thy name. 
P, Out of my kingdom am I diiven by force. 
E. Out of the which thou camest me for to drive. 
P. Pimish, gods, this wicked tyitint here. 
E, Pmy to the gods in Greece and not in Thebes. 
P, No Siivage beast so cruell nor unjust. 



i 



■n. --I. <■* 



H?.-.cr-^v ^^?«?^^"^-"~ 



88 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



39 



E. Not cruell to my country like to thee. 

P. Since from my right I am \\'yth wix)ng deprived. 

E. Eke fi-om thy life, if long thou tany here. 

P, father, heai-e what injuries I tiike. 

E. As though thy divellLsh deeds wei-e hid from him. 

2. This and most of Eteocles' hould be 
introduced with y£. ' To sjxjil ' (fut. piirticiple). 

3. * I intend justice, hear my cause (r«^a), O gods. 

6. Who hate thy name who doest (partic.) evil. 

7. Am driven (perfect). 

10. Call thou on Hellenic [gods], not gods of 

Thel^es. 

11. Thou conquerest in injustice the race of cruel 

12. And thou conquerest me in cruelty (jxartic.) 
towards thy countiy. 

14. Eke — fiiv oi5>'.* 



Exercise 26 (a), 

York, See, see. King Richard doth himself appear. 
As doth the blushing discontented sun 
Fi-om out the fiery portal of the east ; 
When he perceives the envious clouds are bent 
To dim his glory, and to stain the track 
Of his bright passage to the Occident. 
Yet looks he like a king ; behold his eye, 
As bright as is the eagle's, lightens forth 
Controlling majesty : alack, alack, for woe, 
That any harm should stain so ^''" a show. 



1. A person enteiing on the stage is introduced bv 
Kai firjv ode. 

2. ' Like (^(ktjv) the sun blushing with anger, 

3. when out of the shining eastern gate, 

4. 5. 6. appeai-ing he sees envious clouds about to 
dull his light and stain the march of his wheels as he 
goes (gen. pai-t.) already the i-oad towards the evening. 

7. And yet he seems to look-upon as a monarch : 

8. 9. for see how liis eyes, burning Uke [those] of 
an eagle, flash a Trarrorrefiyoy (riXac, Alas ! (interjec- 
tion extra metrum) 

10. 11. 'Tis right {napEari) to mourn, for would 
that no (/i») c50£A£V n) hai-m ever touched such beauty !' 



Exercise 26 (6). 

King R. We are amazed ; and thus long have we stood 
To watch tlie fearful bending of thy knee, 
Because we thought oui^elf thy lawful king : 
And if we be, how dare thy joints forget 
To pay their awful duty to our presence ? 
If we be not, show us the hand of God 
That hath dismissed us from our stewardship : 
For weU we know, no hand of blood and bone 
Can griije the saci-ed handle of oui- sceptre, 
Unless he do profane, steal, or usurp. 
And though you think that all, as you have done, 
Have torn theii' souls by turning them from us, 
And we are barren, and bereft of friends ;— 
Yet know, my master, God omnipotent 
Is mustering in his clouds on our behalf 
Armies of i)esti]ence : and they shall strike 



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t -h. -AWk* m/j.Jvai 



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40 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



41 



Your childi-en yet unborn and unbegot, 
That lift your vassal hands against my head, 
And threat the glory of my precious crown. 

Shakspcare* 

I. 2. 3. * Wonder holds me, and for long I am 
standing watching thee, if thou wilt bend the pious knee 
to him who seems to be thy king (ri;^>a»'i'fu£n') justly. 

4. 5. And if it is so, how dost thou remit the pa3nLng 
(to /i»/ vifieii') to me present the fitting duty (/io7pa)1 
6. 7. And if otherwise, what chance from the gods 
has cast me out of this scepti-e-bearing 1 

8. 9. 10. For so much at least I know that no 
one of mort^iLs could tkc. . . . unless [they were] robbed 
(partic.) through insult or violence. 

II. 12. 13. And yet you think that all ecpially by 
betraying me (ru/ua), Xutijdadai ^peVac, and that we 
ai'e &c, 

14. 15. 16. Yet know &c. ... is now collecting aid 
for us in the clouds, an army of all-consuming diseases. 

17-20. And these shall light uj)on imbom chil- 
dren, and the i-Kitriropoi, who dare thus to raise <fec. . . . 
with-puri)ose-to drive me out (wc with fut. part.) of 
my precious throne.* 

N.B. Remember always that * sceptres' and 

* thrones ' are emblems of I'oyalty in Greek, not 

* crowns.' 



Exercise 27. 



Macbeth. Blood hath been shed ere now, i* th' olden 
time, 
Ere hiunan statute piu*ged the gentle weal ; 



Ay, and since too, mm-thers have been performed 
Too terrible for the eju- : the times have been, 
That when the brains were out the man would die. 
And there would end : but now, they rise again. 
With twenty mortal murthers on their crowns. 
And push us from our stools. This is more sti-ange 
Than such a mui-ther is. 

Lady M, My worthy lord, 

Your noble friends do lack you. 

'^' I do forget :— 

Do not muse at me, my most worthy friends ; 
1 have a strange infii-mity, which is nothing 
To those that know me. Come, love and health 

to all: 
Then I'll sit do^vn : — give me some wine — fill full : 
I diink to the general joy of the whole table. 
And to our dear friend Banquo, whom we miss : 
Would he were here ! To all, and him, we thirst, 
And all to all. Shakspeare. 

I. 2. 3. *In truth long-ago we have heard that 
formerly blood was shed often before human laws re- 
strained Jt with gentle puiification, 

4. 5. 6. and afterwards [men] committed murders 
too disgraceful to hear (compai-ative followed by T, and 
infinitive), and there was [a time] when a man, his 
black essence (/ifVoj.) flowing to thegi-ound, died once- 
for-all. 

7. 8. 9. And this an end ; but now rising up again, 
teeming as to theii- heads with ten thousand murders, 
they push <kc. 

10. And this is* (fee. 

II. But know that those present miss you. Subject 






■■q i»<»'-i.-^-f: .iwr..jf.*rf-M-:i ■ Jt.^a^A.iJK'iiJ AAia-aj 









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42 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OP 



of latter verb (those present), jvccording to Greek 
idiom, here must be object of former verb (know). 

12-15. 'A forgetfulness holds me; do not, O best- 
friends, do not look at me : this is a tenuble disease 
that I nourish ; but those who have associated with 
me {6fn\iu))j the friends of youth (Ik viov), take no heed 
(impers.) of this. 

16. I sit — give wine and fill the cup. 

17-20. To this company of guests here, and to 
dearest Baykuwr not present, whom would that we 
could see, we di-ink-a-bcalth kindly, all together 
greeting (h^iov^iai) all.' 



Exercise 28 (a). 

Ay me, ay me ! the woods decay and fall. 

The vapoiu^ weep their burden to the groimd, 

Man comes and tills the field and Ues beneath, 

And after many a summer dies the swau. 

Me only cruel immortality 

Consumes : I wither slowly in thine arms. 

Here at the quiet limit of the world, 

A white-haired shadow roaming like a dream 

The ever-silent spjioes of the East, 

Far folded mists, and gleaming halls of Morn. 

Alas I for this gi^ey shadow, once a mtin — 

So glorious in his beauty and thy choice, 

Who madest him thy chosen, that he seemed 

To his great heart none other than a God ! 

1-4. * Alas ! the leaves dec (all literally) and 

the swan dies, having many summers. 

5. Me alone the grief of immortal life wears out, 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



43 



6. 7. for I wither in thine arms, wandering here at 
the quiet (kc. 

8. 9. 10. like the white ghost of a shadow, to the 
dumb regions of the Rising and the biilliant abodes of 
Eos, and the folds of mists woven from afai-. 

11. 12. 13. Alas, for this white shadow! for for- 
merly he was a man resplendent in beauty and chosen 
for thee, boasting in his exalted mind as a god.' 



Exercise 28 (b). 

I asked thee, * Give me immoi-tality,* 
Then didst thou grant mine asking with a smile, 
Like wealthy men who care not how they give. 
But thy strong Hours indignant worked their wills. 
And beat me down and man-'d and wasted me. 
And though they could not end me, left me maimed 
To dwell in presence of immortal youth, 
Immort{\l age beside immortal youtb. 
And all I was in ashes. 

Can thy love, 
Tliy beauty make amends, though even now 
Close over us, the silver star, thy guide, 
Shines in those tremulous eyes that fill with tears 
To hear me 1 Let me go : take back thy gift. 

1. 2. 3. * I asked thee, gi-ant me to be immortal, 
and thou laughing accomplishedst the gift, hiKrjv rich 
men &c, 

4. 5. 6. But the Hours fulfilled terrible satisfaction, 
powerful in wrath, and wasted and miserably de- 
stroyed (Xwftaofjat) me reduced-to-ashes (»:aratr7ro^/^ai); 






;»■.' 



l^M 



4 r^sr 






/ ^ 



44 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

7. 8. 9. but not being strong [enough] to i-emove 
{tlatpiu)) me, left me to dwell maimed, immoi-tal old 
man near immortal (put the two " immortals " to- 
gether) youth, and the dust of former beautj. 

(The rest in five lines) Does then thj lovely beauty 
give me amends? but the silver star near shines 
through thy trembling eyes, while I sj^k, filled with 
tears. Wherefoi-e let me go «fec.' 



Exercise 28 (c). 
Why should a man desire in any way 
To vary from the kindly i-ace of men, 
Or pass beyond the goal of ordinance, 
Whei-e all should pause, as is most meet for aU ? 
A soft ail- fans the cloud apart ; there comes 
A glimpse of that fair world where I was born. 
Once moi-e the old mysterious glimmer steals 
From thy pure brows, jind fi-om thy shoulders pure 
And bosom beating with a heai-t renewed. 
Thy cheek l>egiDs to redden through the gloom, 
Thy sweet eyes brighten slowly close to mine 
Ere yet they blind the stars, and the wild team 
Which love thee, yearning for thy yoke arise 
And shake the darkness from theii* loosened manes. 
And beat the twilight into flakes of fire. 

Tennyson, 

1. 2. *rt Traiiuiy should a man desire in any way 
(^iipog) (fee. 

3. 4. and pass the limit fated by the gods, where (fee. ? 
^ 5. 6. Kai fit)y a soft breath oj^ens the cloud, and a 
vision of the dark world whei-e I waa bom, arii^ti. 



GREEK IAMBIC VEBSE. 



45 



7. 8. 9. And of thy pure brows again the former 
awful brightness comes on me, and of thy pure neck 
and bosom in which renewed heart leaps. 

10. Literallv. 

11-14. And thy two eyes shine-out now near to 
mine before they hide the light of dark stars, and be- 
fore the <Tupa<popoif longing for thy yoke, come forth 
from their beds , 

15. 16. for they will be here {i)lov(n) shaking dark- 
ness from their manes, and breaking the dawn lq sparks 
of fire.' 



Exercise 29. 

Whither at length wilt thou abuse our patience ? 

Still shall thy fury mock us 1 to what license 

Does thy unbridled boldness nin itself? 

Dost thou not feel thy counsels all laid open, 

And see thy wild conspiracy lx>und in 

With eaeh man's knowledge] which of all this 

ordei" 
Canst thou think ignorant, if they ^vill but utter 
Their conscience to the right, if what thou didst 
Last night, what on the former, where thou wert. 
Whom thou didst call together, what your plots 

were] 
O age and manners ! this the consul sees. 
The senate imderstands, yet this man lives ! 
Lives ! ay, and comes here into council with us. 
Partakes the public cares, and with his eye 
Marks and points out each man of us to slaughter. 
And we, good men, do satisfy the state. 
If we can shun but this man's sword and madness. 

B. JoTison. 



ff:- 



k^S^^J 









^if 



46 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



1.2. * To wliat extent of daring woiild'st thou go 1 
up to what point shall we endui'e thee raging in vain 1 

3. or what meivsiu'e of madness is there to thee the 
thunder-stricken 1 

4. What, dost thou know thou art all unfolded 
(portic.) long ago? 

5. 6. dost not perceive all that thou secretly pre- 
paredst already hedged-in by these [who are] con- 
scious 1 

7-10. liru thiukest thou that any of those here is 
ignorant, if any will say icar' opBov all that he knows, 
what yestercLiy, what lately thou didst discuss (ayop«- 
ofiai) by night, meeting with whom, proposing what 
ill-counsel 1 

11. 12. venemble At^wc ! this <fec. 

13. 14. Nay, rather he shares the council, delibe- 
rates ((ppai^o^ai) common things, foreshowing ^vith his 
eyes each man to slaughter. 

15. 16. And with us good men the city is pleased 
if we only avoid (part.) the sword of this madman.' 



Exercise 30. 

Arm you against your other enemies, 

I'll make a peace between your soul and you. 

Young Arthur is alive : tliis hand of mine 

Is yet a maiden and an innocent hand 

Not painted with the crimson spots of blood. 

Within this basom never entered yet 

The dreadful motion of a murderous thought, 

And you have slandered nature in my form ; 

Which, howsoever rude exteriorly, 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



47 



Is yet the cover of a faii'er mind 

Than to be butcher of an innocent child. 

Sfutkspeare. 

1. 2. 'There is need to arm-thyself-against other 
enemies ; but towards thee let thei-e be peace to thy 
mind. 

3. 4. 5. The boy still lives, for this hand is virgin 
yet, having done nothing of what you say, nor is stained 
with muixierous drops. 

6. 7. The alffxpo^Jiinic opfit) of deadly counsels never 
yet entered tliis heai't. 

8. 9. Literal — rude, aypnoiroi;, 

10. 11. I bear within a milder mind than to slay 
an infant with cruel hands.* 



Exercise 31. 



At that time I did take thee in my arms, 

And with thy mantle did I cover thee ; 

I was thy nui*se : no woman could have been 

A kinder to thee : I was not a.shamed 

To do for thee all little offices, 

However strange to me : I tended thee 

Till life retunied ; and when thine eyes first opened, 

I had thee in my aims. Since then, when have I 

Altered my feelings towards thee ] Many thousands 

Have I made rich, presented them >vith lands ; 

Rewarded them witli dignities and honoure; 

Thee have I loved : my heart, myself, I gave 

To thee ! They were all aliens : thou wert 

Our child and inmate. Max ! thou canst not leave 



me; 



^jjj^^SiLh^^^aM^^ii^ 



iiifiaiai 



48 



EXEBCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



It cannot be : I may not, will not think 
That Max can leave me. 

Coleridge (from Schiller). 

I. 2. 'I took thee kc. . . . suirounding thy form 
ttvkcktOu' in a cloak. 

3. 4. 5. I was present as a nurse, nor could any 
woman, «tc. . . . and I endui^ to serve in all (cognate 
ace.) the little things, and beyond my nature, 

6. 7. ever tending thee (araXXw) till thou breathedst 
again, and I held thee opening thine eyelids in my 
arms. 

8. 9. 10. WTien since that time did T change to- 
wards thee my manners 1 I made-nch thousands with 
lands, and rewarded them honoui*ed (adj.) \vith many 
pri\41eges ; 

II. 12. 13. thee I loved, to thee aloae I gave my 
whole soul, nay myself, holding them (rove /'«»') ns 
strangers, hut thee, as our child, reared in the house. 

14. 15. 16. Thou could'st not endure to leave me. — 
It is not possible; I will disbelieve this — it is im- 
possible that thou wilt leave me.' 



Exercise 32. 

Tlie world had never tiiken so full note 

Of what thou art., hadst thou not been imdone ; 

And only thy affliction hath begot 

More fame than thy best fortune could have done ;. 

For ever by adversity are wrought 

Tlie greatest works of admiration : 

And all the fair examples of renowTi 

Out of distress and misery are gi*own. 






»> 



"I 



?*r»' 



GKEEK lAMRTC VEKSE. 



49 



How could we know that thou could'st have 

endui-ed, 
With a reposed cheer, wrong and disgrace ; 
And with a heart and countenance assured 
Have looked stem death and hoiTor in the face ! 
How should we know thv soul had been secured 
In honest coimsels, and in way unbase, 
Hadst thou not stood to show us what thou weii; 
By thy affliction that descried thy heart ! 
It is not but the tempest that doth show 
The seaman's cimning : but the field thiit tries 
Tlie cjiptiiin's coiu*age ; and wo come to know 
Best what men are in their worst jeopardies. 

1. 2. 'Thou never wouldst have shown &c. . . . 
except by meeting with all-destructive evils ; 

3. 4. and out of calamities thou gainedst greater 
glory, such as thou wouldest not [have gained] by ap- 
pearing most fortunate. 

5. 6. And if there is a toil k-aXXivthog to men, those 
who are intimate (xf>»/Tf^oi) \vith misfortunes are wont 
to perform it, 

7. 8. and that which had rejiutation as well done, 
grew (iflXafTTE) out of tkc. 

9. 10. How could'st thou have been evident to us 
as able (itrxvto) to bear blame and ill-fame with 
couitigeous heai-t, 

(11. 12. part of 13.) or with enduring countenance 
and heart, to look in-the-face &c, 1 

13. 14. And who would have known thee secui'ed 
upon a simple way and good mind, 

15. 16. had not thy sufferings, as a touchstone of 

E 



■1 ?"■,■• 



60 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

the heart, shown what a imUii* thou hast allotted 
17. Storm, if anything, pi-oves (aor.) the sailors 

^ 18 19 20. and to the ti-ial of courage in battle the 
captain comes, and in dangers we investigate what each 

miin is/ 



Exercise 33. 

I had a dream, which was not all a dream. 

Tlie bright sun was extinguished, and the stars 

Did wander darkling in the etemiU space, 

Riyless and pathless, and the icy earth 

Swung blind and blackening in the moonless air ; 

Man '^e and went-and came, and brought no 

clay ; 

The rivers, lakes, and ocean all stood still. 

And nothing stirred within their silent depths ; 

Ships sailorless lay rottiiig on the sea, 

And their masts fell down piecemeal ; as they 

dropped, 
Thev slept on the abyss without a surge— 
The waves were dead : the tides were in their gi-ave. 
The moon, their misti-ess, had expired before ; 
The winds were withered in the stj\gnant air, 
And the clouds perished ! Darkness had no need 
Of aid from them— she was the universe. 

Byron. 

1. a saw a dream, in which there was something 

from a god ; , • , i j *u^ 

2. 3. for the sun^s flame had perished, and the 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



51 



stars were wandering (Tt:6Toy ^e^optcora in the piimeval 
void, 

4-7. dark, untended, and the earth was swinging 
(iraWofuu) frozen through the air without moon, blind, 
blackened (KiXaiyow), and dawn followed not the cut,- 
ocoi of days ; 

8. 9. the rivei-s ikc. . . . slept, and nothing was 
tfjLxpvxoy in <fec. 

10. 11. 12. And ships wei-e rotting, so that the 
rotten nuist of the unshepherded hull fell (Karappe7i'), 
which fallen is lulled to sleep on the calm sea. 

13. 14. There wi\.s no longer wave, no tide of the 
sea, d>ing with the dead moon its mistress (Kvpia), 

15. 16. 17. and air was-heavy, having dried up all 
breeze, and clouds gone — thei-e was no need of such 
allies for darkness ruling-over the whole.' 



Exercise 34. 



Gi*ejit honoui-s are great burdens, but on whom 

They're cast with envy, he doth bear two loads, 

His cares must still be double to his joys 

In any dignity ; where, if he err, 

He finds no paixlon : and for doing well 

A most small pi-aLse, and that wrung out by force, 

I sjieak thus, Romans, knowing what the weight 

Of the high charge, you have trusted to me, is. 

Not that thereby I would with art decline 

The good or greatness of your benefit ; 

For I ascribe it to yoiu* singular grace 

And vow to owe it to no title else. 

Except the gods, that Cicero is youi' consul. 

B 2 



rSTWi n , ^ ^ 



;^£jg,'j>' fe-, '■ i.-X-JilM*f 'g>;»«'lwl»aSfcflJh!-Vtfifc JlfthBgAvuBr- " i^ ■■ P>-MMife^Tf^*<.mWaitfJji^ ^'^^^At.J^i^<i^wA\^-'t^j±»Mi-':"AX^J*J,' r '»W^■fli»*^ygV]iL^I^^'^Jfet^^■ff'^^ 



52 



BXBBCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



53 



I have no urns, no dusty monuments, 

No broken images of anccstoi-s ; 

But for myself I have pi-cpareil this sti-ength. 

Jonson. 

1. 2. * The burden of rule is greivt if it falls (ptVw) 
heavily'; and whoever has envy, to him is double 

weight ; 

3-6. for to him who niles cams excel doubly over 
joy ; and if he en% he finds cfec kc and from 

an imwilling mind. 

7. 8. This I, not l)eing inexixjrienced, sjiy U) yon, 
men, to (rrp^c) what a weight of rule 1 am yoked ; 

9. 10. not as if to thrust away (fut. paH.) with 
cunning words the gift which is most noble and most 

11. 12. 13. for by reason (c^i'fko) of you favourjvble 
to me* except for the sake of the gods, and not of 
othei-s I will sjiy, I swau that I am here the Cttci-oc 

of Rome. 

(The rest in 4 lines.) Since I have not mound- 
heaped piles (oyicai/ia), and monuments foul with dust, 
no broken images in my hous.^ but avroQ l^avr^ &c/ 



Exercise 35. 
^Epylus. And to what friends should I for aid 

apply 1 
Merope. The royal iwie of Tcmenus, m Argos— 
.Ep, That house, like ours, intestine minder maims. 
Me. Thy Spai-tan cousias, Pi'ocles and hLs brother— 
^Ep. Love a won cause, but not a cause to win. 
Me. My father then, and his Arcadian chiefs— 



^Ep. Mean still to keep aloof from Dorian broil. 
J/f . Wait then until suflicient help appears. 
jE)). Orestes in Mycena? had no more. 
Me. Ho to fulfil an order i-aised his hand. 
uEp. What order more precise had lie than 1 1 
Me. AjK)llo j>ejileti it from his Delphian cave. 
jEp, A mother's murder needed best divine. 
Me, He had a best at least, and thou hast none. 
uEp. The gods command not where the heart speaks 

cleai". 
Me. Thou wilt destroy, I see, thyself and us. 

M. Arnold. 

1. * From what friend should I find aid? 

2. The illustrious cliildren oi'ViipEvoq in Argos 

3. ai-e sick as we \vith intestine (tp(f>v\ioc) war. 

4. Procles then and his Kaaig, thy cousins — 

5. ai-c TTpog the winners, not tlie defeated. 
(Next four literal) Mean to keep <kc. (fieXXovaiv). 

10. He armed his hand commanded, not willingly. 

1 1 . AVliat orders had he more Kvpiog 1 

12. Literal. 

1 3. The deed required a prophetic voice. 

14. At all events, the gods ix)used him with oi-acles, 
not thee. 

1 5. The deity is silent, if &c. 

16. Alas! &c.* 



Exercise 36. 

Wallenstein. Who now persists in calling fortune false % 
To me she has proved faithful, with fond love 


















54 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



Took me from out the common ninks of men, 
And, like a mother goddess, with strong ai-m 
Carried me swiftly up the st^'ps of life. 
Notliing is common in my destiny, 
Nor in tlie fun-ows of my hand. Who dai-es 
Interpret then my life for me as 'twere 
One of the undistinguishable many 1 
Ti'ue in this present moment I api)ear 
Fall'n low indeed ; but I shall i-ise again : 
The liigh Hood will soon follow on this ebb. 
Gordon. And yet i-emember I the gootl okl proverb, 
* Let the night come l)efore we praise the day.' 
I would l»e slow fiom long-continued fortune 
To gather hoj^e ; for hope is the companion 
Given to the unfort\inate by pitying Heaven. 

Colei^lye (from Schiller), 

1. Literal. 

2-5. ' To me she luis been faithful, for she lovingly 
chose me out of oi rvxovrec, ami like kc, ... up the 
irpotTa^i^iitTiir of life. 

6-9. Neither my destiny tXaxi anything common, 
nor these *kc. . . . ; then who dares ctaipi'iv my life a.s 
of some belonging to (^iTtifn) the &c. 1 

10. 11. 12. For if to-day I seem to lie very low, I 
shall raise my heiid, and this a/i7rwr«c shall receive a 

full-tide. 

13. 14. And yet tVc, 'tis right to pmlse day when 

night is gone. 

15. 16. 17. And trxoX^ would I feed hoyKi out of 
long-continued fortune, who from compassionate gods 
stands by the imfortunate.' 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



Exercise 37. 



55 



Thus Nathan sjiid unto his lord the king : 

There were two men, both dwellei-s in one town — 

The one was mighty and exceeding rich 

In oxen, sheep, and cattle of the field ; 

The other poor, having nor ox nor calf 

Nor other Ciittle, save one little lamb 

Wliich he had bought and noiuished by the hand ; 

And it grew up and fed with him and liis, 

And eat and drank as he and his were wont, 

And in his bosom slept, and was to live 

As was his daughter or his dearest child. 

Tliei-e came a sti-anger to this wealthy man : 

And he refused and spared to take his own. 

Or of his store to dress or make him meat. 

But took the poor man's sheep, partly, poor man's 

store, 
And dressed it for this stranger in his house. 
What, tell me, shall be done to him for this ] 

Feele. 

1_4. < The prophet then said thus to his master, 
Thei-e wei« &c. . . . (cattle, aytXat). 

5. 6. Liteiul (ciittle, 7rpo/3ara), 

7. 8. 9. which having bought, he educated with 
his hand, a sweet lyXatrrnfjia biwight-up in the house, 
drinking and eating together with the domestics, 

10. 11. sleeping wnthin his bosom, as about to lead 
the life of some daughter or dear child. 

12. Literal. 

13. 14. And he spired to take (insert fji)) of so 
many things, nor. was willing to cook any fatted meat, 



' ) 






■r^PT^ip^^^P^lp^^:-- 






ymv 



■«'' - * - Pj*^«5; 



f';^T^^^fm^,' '■ 



56 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



57 



15. 16. 17. tiiking the poor man's lamb, treasui-e 
of the house, dai-ing to set such feast befoi-e his guest : 
what is he worthy to suffer 1 ' 



Exercise 38. 

BalioL If cunning have po%v^r to win the king, 
Let thovsc employ it that C5in flatter him ; 
If honoured deed may reconcile the king, 
It lies in me to give and him to take. 

Edward. Why, what i-emains for Baliol now to give? 

B. Allegiance, as l)ecomes a royal kmg. 

Ed. Wlmt league of faith, where league is bi-oken 
oncel 

B. The gieater hope in them that once have fallen. 

Ed. But ft)<)lish arc those monarchs, that do }Held 
A con(juered i-ealm upon suV»missive vows. 

B. Thei*e, take my crown, and so redeem my life. 

Ed. Ay, sir : that was the choicest plea of lx)th ; 
For whoso quells the pomp of Imughty minds, 
And bi-eaks their staff whereon they build their 

trust, 
Is sure in wanting power they cannot hann. 
Bt\hol shall live ; but yet ^vithin such bounds 
That if his wings gi-ow flig, they may Ije dipt. 

Feele, 

1. 2. *If the king is wont to yield to cunning 
words, let them prevail who have flatteiy (infin. with 

ai-ticle) ; 

3. 4. but if one confei-s worthy obligation by 

doing well, this is in us, and he shall take it. 

5. How so? what remainder say you you give? 



6. ro iriaTuv kc. 

7. What is trustworthy if it be once belied 1 

8. Thei« is hope at least for the fallen to be set up. 

9. 10. I reckon him nowhere who having the au- 
thoiity (Kvf)og) changes for oaths wliatever he has 
taken by ai-ms. 

11. Redeem — fwofiai. 

12. Best for you and him is what you say. 
13-15. For whoever tjimes the \ >ride of the haugh ty , 

and bre;\ks (aoiist) the sceptre in which they trust, 
being sti-ong against weak he remains unhurt. 

16. 17. Therefore thou shalt live; but be sm-e 
that if thou passest the boundaries thou shalt have 
thy wings clipped.' 



Exercise 39. 

I never yet knew, soldiei*s, that in fight 

Words added vii-tue unto valiant men ; 

Or that a geneml's oration made 

An army fall or stand ; but how much prowess, 

Habitujil or natuml, each man's breji^t 

Was owner of, so much in i\ct it showed. 

Whom neither glory or danger can excite, 

'Tis vain to attempt with speech ; for the mind's 

fear 
Keeps all brave sounds from entering at that ear. 
I yet would warn you some few things, my fiiends, 
A nd give you reason of my present counsels. 

B. Jofison. 

1, 2. *I never yet <kc. . . . speech begat virtue in 
noble mind ; 



■c** 



"iW'Jt * 'Tlv 



■^*VS *3N7p^ 



Hv- *** H j^ S 



58 



EXERCISES IN TKE COMrOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE, 



59 



3. 4. or that to foil and stand was for an army in- 
the-power-of (tVi) generals speaking well or ill ; 

5. 6. but what a nnm had leceiveil by nature or 
experience, so much he showed in battle. 

7-9 But to whom nor glory nor risk is a care, 
speech excites not ; for fear keeps from liis eai-s honour- 
able [things] so that he i-eceives them not in nund. 

10. 11. Literal. 



Exercise 40. 
Ccmawlra. Cry, Trojans, cry ! lend me ten thousand 

eves 

And I will fill them with prophetic tears. 
Hector. Peace, sister, peace ! , , ,, 

Cass. Virgins, and boys, mid-age and wrinkled eld, 

Soft infancy that nothing canst but cry, 

Add to my clamoui-s ! let us pay betimes 

A moiety of that mass of woe to come. 

Cry, Ti-ojans, C17 ! practise your eyes with teiu-s ! 

Troy must not be, nor goodly Ilium stiuid ; 

Our fii-e-brand brother, Paris, burns us all. 
Ihc. Now, youthful Troilus, do not these high 

sti-ains 
Of divination in our sister work 
Some touches of i-emoi-se % Ov is your blood 
So miadly hot that no discoui-se of reason, 
Nor fejir of bad success in a bad ciiase, 
Can quaUfy the s^vme % Shakspmre, 

1. 2. ^ Cry, Trojans ; give «kc. ... to me flowing 
with pi-ophetic tears. 



3. What sjiyest thou I — stop thine ill-omened 

mouth. 

4. 5. 6. Old men, virgins, youths, men and suck- 
ing influits, able to cry [and] nothing else, ciy with 

me. 

7. 8. Cry-aloud, anticipating the season; let us 
mourn now the coming lamentations (cognate). 

9. 10. 11. Pi-actise floods of tears— Troy is un- 
done, gone is Ilium's glory, with such torches Paiis 

&c. 

12. 13. Art thou still bold, young Troilus, healing 

the god-sent voice of thy sister % 

14. 15. 16. or hast advanced to such [a height] of 
obstinacy, neither to Ije turned by prudent discoui-se 
{ye7i.) nor fear the failures of ill deeds % * 



Exercise 41. 

PyUules. Whei-efore all at once 

Doth anxious thought o'ercloud thy brow serene 1 

Iphigenia. Forgive me ! as light clouds athwart the 
sun, 
So cai-es and fears float darkling o'er my soul. 

P. 0, banish feixr ! with danger it hath formed 
A close alliance — they are constant fiiends. 

/. It is an honest scruple, which forbids 
That I should cunningly deceive the king. 
And plunder liim who wtis my second sire. 

P. Him thou dost fly, who would have slain thy 
brother. 

/. To me, at letist, he hath been ever kind. 



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EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



1\ What Fate commands is not ingratitude. 
/. Alas ! it still i-emains ingi^jititiide. 

Necessity alone can justify it. 
/'. Thee, befoi-o goils and men it jastifie>. 
/. But my own heart is still unsatisfied. 
P. Scruples too rigid ai-e a cloak for pride. 
/. I (smnot argue, I can only feel. 
P. ConscioiLS of right, thou should'st respect thyself. 

Swamokk (Jr. Goet/te). 

1. 2. *^Vllat is thei-e newl for evidently ag;iin 

<T1*1PI IvC 

"^ 3. 4. 5. Forgive me— for »vs light dew makes the 
sun invisible, so cai-es hide my h»ut for a whUe. 

6. 7. Take heart— for f«ir and dangerous chance 

are evil conspiratoi-s. 

8 9 10. Shame, assessor of justice, not feiir holds 

me; since now I am intending («.\<.) to take away 
what I ought not by theft (partic.) from a kmg not 
infeiior to a father. 

1 1 . Tliou llie,st one who intends &c. 

12. Literal. j • x 

13. What you rnxxy be comix^lled to do is not 

culpable. 

U. Culpable indeed, but deserving i)ardon. 

15. Yes— among gods and men everywhere. 

16. My heiirt does not agree. 

17. 'Tis obstinacy to love the imi>ossible. 

is! I was born not to enquire, but fTa>^poi'i7r. 
19. So being sensible, be content with (artpyuf) thy 
disposition.* 



QKEEK IAMBIC TEBSE. 



Exercise 42. 



61 



Richard Infer fair England's peace by this alliance. 
Elizabeth. Wliich she shall purchase with still lasting 

war. 
/?. Say, that the king, which may command, entreats. 
E, That at her hands which the king's King forbids. 
Ji. Say, she shall l)e a high and mighty queen. 
E, To wail the title, as her mother doth. 
/?. Say, I will love her everlsustingly. 
E, But how long shall that title * ever * last 1 
i?. Sweetly in force imto her fair life's end. 
E. But how long fairly shall her sweet life last 1 
B, So long as heaven and nature lengthens it. 
E. So long !is hell and Richard likes of it. 
Ji. Say, I, her sovereign, am her abject love. 
E, But she, your subject, loathes such sovereignty. 
/?. Be elofjuent in my behalf to her. 
E. An honest tale sj^eeds best being plainly told. 
/?. Then in plain terms tell her my loving tale. 
E. Plain and not honest is too harsh a style. 

Shak82)eare, 

1. 'Know that this alliance (k-T/toc) will bring 
(partic.) 4tc. 

2. For which she shall repay lasting war. 

3. Which may command, say, " when he might " 

4. Yes, to do that which <fec. . 

5. Literal. 

6. Yes, she lamenting as I do. 

7. We will always love her X£x>/« 

8. But to what time do you speak of this "always " 1 



. ■' ■. ' 



/I 



62 EXEKCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

9. Deai-ly, as long as the .kar one lives. 

10. Literal— how long, /if'xf" ^''" > 

\l N^^tthev so long «s it ,.1-se the king and 

""T^Jtj'that one ruling others is her slave^ 

U. But being your inferior she abominate, thi. 

""^^15 As a suppliant entreat for me iro.K-.-X-c. 

IC". With Ilv\e words one should speak moder- 
ately. 

\l Ttrwhich is neither n.ode.-ate nor varied is 

flapv. 

Exercise 43 (a). 

h.IhUip, wherefore will I 

Constance. \es, that 1 win, 

I to',° them fi^m their bonds ; and med aloud, 

. O that these hands could so .-edeem my son 

As they have given these hai.^ their hberty ! 

But now I envy at their hberty, 

And >viU again commit them to then- bonds, 

Becvuse my poor child is a prisoner. 

And father cardinal, I have hea.-d you say, 

tC we shall see and know our friends m heaven : 

If that be true, I shaU see my Iwy >vga.n i 

For since the birth of Cain, the fi..t male chUd, 

To him that did but yestenlay suspn*. 

There was not such a giiicious o,*at«re bom. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



63 



1. * Arrange again the lock of bound-up hair. 

2. 3. I mil do so not unwilling and will say why; 
for when I tore them away I prayed thus : 

4-7. " Would that this hand as it frees my hair, 
might so deliver my child ! " and now again envying 
the freedom, I will make it {(T(pe) a prisoner, since my 
wretched child is bound. 

8. 9. 10. pnest, I heaid you [say] that every 
one in Hades will i-ecognise the dearest : if that is so 

11. 12. 13. For since &c. ... to him that had 
yesterday a^Trvoaq fliov — &c.' 



Exercise 43 (6). 

Constance. But now will canker sori-ow eat my bud, 
And chase the native beauty from his cheek, 
And he wOl look as hollow as a ghost ; 
As dim and meagre as an ague's fit ; 
And so he'll die ; and, rising so again, 
Wlien I shall meet him in the court of heaven, 
I shall not know him : therefore never, never 
Must I behold my pretty Ai-thur more. 

Pamhdph. You hold too heinous a respect of gi-ief. 

Const. He talks to me that never had a son. 

K, Ph. You are as fond of giief as of your child. 

Shakspeare. 

1-5. * But now Xvttt; ^Otvac will drive <fec. . . ., 
eating the timely bud, and as an unsubstantial image 
of a corpse falling in the deadly attacks of disease, my 
child appears a soidless shade. 



* . " 



" ■* H' 



7*^- 



64 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

^ . A i.n • and when I meet him thus 

6-9. And so &c. . . •, ^^^ \ 

» • .,7 T chilli not &c, . . • > 
.^app^unng among o. c.. \^^'^^^ 

therefore I shall not &c. . . • ^^^^ 

10 Too much you nourish gnet, iJuiy. 

n. wTmay one say this who ha.s not begotten 

offspring.' 

12. Literal. 



Exercise 44 (a). 
Kir.j H.rry. Most subject is the fatU^t soil for 

S:t:h^its.n.yond.heh^r^^^^^^^^ 

ind ™ tl'tSnes'that you .ball look upon, 
mL I am sleeping with -^ --;^- ^, 
Fo.. when hi. ^^^ff^^Z^, 

men >.ge -^J^'^^^t^n^t meet together. 
\viipn means ana lavisu m.in 

of tevrs, and fovel>ode.s lU, seeming 



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: % 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



65 



times and ages lefcHshp (Trafntjfii) which shall happen, 
when I am lying &c. ; 

11. 12. 13. for when »J/3pic unresti-ained prevails. 
i&d anger excites the impulse of mind, and intem- 
perate disposition meets-with present opportunity, 

14. 15. these passions will urge to winged dan^^er 
and fronting destruction.' 



Exercise 44 (b), 

Warmick. My gracious lord, you look beyond him 
quite; 
The prince but studies his companions, 
Like a strange tongue : whei-ein, to gain the lan- 
guage, 
'Tis needful that the most immodest word 
Be looked upon and learned : which once attained, 
Your highness knows, comes to no fuither use 
Than to be known and hated. So, like gross 

terms, 
The prince will, in the perfectness of time, 
Cast off his followers ; and their memory 
Shall as a pattern or a measure live, 
By which his grace must mete the lives of others ; 
Turning past evils to advantages. 

Shakspeare. 

L * O master, how superfluous thy word ! 

2-5. for he, as one wishing to leani a foreign 
tongue, of necessity considers every cva<ptjfjiui' word ; 
that, once having learned them, liei-eafter he may 
think [them] nothing but hatefulness. 









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EXEHCISES IN TTTB COMrOSITlON OF 



GKEEK IAMBIC TERSE, 



67 



6. 7. 8. Thus poi-suaded, he in time will cast off 
his present companions — nevertheless observing the 
memory for the sake of pattern or measure 

9. 10. with which, measuiing ike. . . ., he shall be 
benefited by post evils. ' 



Exercise 45. 



Tliis is that moment. See, our ai-my chieftains, 

Our best, our noblest, are assembled round you, 

Tlieir kinglike leader ! on your nod they wait. 

The single thi-eads, which here your prosperous 

fortune 

Hath woven together in one potent web 

Instinct with destiny, let them not 

Uni-avel of themselves. If you jxinnit 

These chiefs to sepamte, so unanimous 

Bring you them not a second time together. 

*Tis the high tide that heaves the stmnded ship, 

And every individual's spirit wax&s 

In the great stream of multitudes. Behold, 

They ai*e still here, here still ! but soon the war 

Bursts them once more asunder. He who to-day 

Foi-gets himself, forced onward with the stream, 

Will become sober, seeing but himself. 

Feel only his own weakness, and with speed 

Will fj\ce about, and march on in the old 

High road of duty. 

Colerulge {from Schiller). 

1-4. *Thi8 is <fcc. . . . See chiefs of the army, and 
all the best and noblest, all reverence thee, as ruling 
equal to a king, expecting if you have a sign. 



5. 6. Fjiii' destiny has thus woven single threads 
into a strong web, not without God's will : why do 
you let them unloose themselves 1 

8. 9. 10. If you overlook these leaders separating 
(infinitive) such an assembly, you will never be able 
to collect &c. 

11. 12. 13. The tide lifting a ship takes it (aor.) 
from the shore, and each man's spirit &c. . . . borne 
by the sti-eam of many : you have still — 

14. 15. 16. you have yet present [those] whom 
nevertheless wai- is about to pai-t; the man who for- 
gets himself to-day the sti-eam beai-s-away violently, 

17-20. who will be sober when he sees himself 
alone, and, conscious that he is weak, will turn his 
face, and, simple man, journey-along the <kc.' 



Exercise 46. 

Dauphin, I am by birth a shepherd's daughter, 

My wit untrained in any kind of art. 

Heaven and our Lady gracious hath it pleased 

To shine on my contemptible estate ; 

Lo, when I waited on my tender lambs. 

And to sun's parching heat di.splay'd my cheeks, 

God's mother deigned to appear to me. 

And, in a \4sion full of majesty. 

Willed me to leave my base vocation 

And free my country from calamity ; 

Her aid she promised and assui-ed success : 

In complete glory she revealed herself; 

And, whei-eas I was black and swart before. 

With those clear rays which she infused on me 

That beauty am I blessed with which you see. 

F 2 






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68 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



69 



Ask me what question thou canst possihle, 
And I will answer unpremetUtiited ; 
My courage try by combat if thou dar&st, 
And thou shalt find that I exceed my sex. 

Shakspeare. 

I. 2. *0 king, I am kc. . . ., having understand- 
ing not practised in art**. 

3. 4. Gwl and the cetnroiva deigned to look on me 
so as to brighten me humble ; 

5. 6. 7, for lo, as I Jcc. . . ., and the sun was 
staining my cheek, God's mother <Sm;., 

8. 9. 10. and showed the vision and holy awe of 
heaven, telling me to leave &c. «tc. ; 

II. 12. and said she would <fec. . . ., and was 
seen evidently, shining complete. 

13. 14. 15. And [me], before black-skinned etc.,. 
by means of the i-ays which she dartetl, grace blessed, 

and beauty &c. 

16. 17. Now ask mc all that thou thinkest, and I 

will <kc. . . . «^'€w ^cXcVijc. 

18. 19. Try ike. . . ., and I shall appear strong 

beyond my nature.* 



Exercise 47. 

Gaunt. Now He that made me knows I see thee ill> 
111 in myself to see, and in thee seeing ill. 
Thy death-bed is no lesser tlian thy land, 
Wherein thou liest in reputjition sick ; 
And thou, too cai-eless i^tient that thou art, 
Clommitt'st thy anointed l)ody to the care 
Of those physicians who fii-st wounded thee. 



I 



A thousand flatterei-s sit within thy crown, 
Whose compass is no bigger than thy head ; 
And yet, encaged in so small a verge, 
The waste is no whit lesser than thy land. 
Oh ! had thy grandsire with a prophet's eye 
Seen how his son's son should destroy his sons. 
From forth thy ix^ach lie would have laid thy 

shame, 
Deposing thee before thou wert possessed. 
Which art possessed now to depose thyself. 
Why, cousin, wert thou regent of the world, 
It wei^ a shame to 1^ tliis land by lease ; 
But for the world enjoying but this land, 
Is it not more than shame to shame it so 1 

Shakspeare, 

1.2.* But God (I fvauQ fit knows that I see thee 
{ra ail) ill, though ill myself. 

3. 4. 5. And the betl on which thou liest deadly 
sick, as to fame not body, with incurable suffering, is 
no less than the entire o\(h:\j)(}oq land. 

6. 7. 8. And thou, using superfluous caielessness, 
entrustest thy kingly body to those v<f u)v thou 
chancedst to suffei- the former wound. 

9. 10. 11. Aye, in thy golden crown ten thousand 
flatterers sit (iyecpevw), whose narrow circle does not 
siupass the measiu^ of thy head ; 

12. 13. neveiiiheless, thou destroyest the whole of 
thy land, though encircled by so small (rotrovToc) an 
enclosure. 

14. 15. 16. Alas! if thy gi-andfather had been 
able to foreknow with divining eyes, as a prophet, 
that a son*s son was about to destroy sons. 



W..i5^g-iii^lbteaMtaiuT, J:. :^V^.iiM^^^.^.>X^ja' 



70 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC TERSE. 



71 



17. 18. 19. be assured he would have deprived 
thee of this shiime, and turned thee out of the seat 
befoi-e })ossessing, from which thou, maddened, wishest 
to turn thyself out. 

20. 21. Yet, kinsman, if thou didst rule the whole 
earth, thou wovddst do basely letting tliis ; 

22. 23. but since thou hast this alone of all, how 
dost thou not thus incur a double disgrace ? * 



Exercise 48. 



Ay, ay, larbas ; after this is done, 

None in the world shall have my love but thou. 

So, leave me now ; let none approach this place. 

Now, Dido, with these reliques bum thyself 

And make ^neas famous through the world 

For perjury and slaughter of a queen. 

Here lies the sword that in the darksome cave 

He drew, and swore by to be true to me ; 

Thou shalt bum fii-st ; thy crime Is woi-se than his : 

Here lies the garment which I clothed him in 

When first he came on shoi-e : perLsh tliou too : 

Tliese letters, lines and perjured papers, all 

Shall burn to cindei-s in this precious tlame. 

And now, ye gods, that guide this staiTy frame, 

And order all things at your high dispose, 

Grant, though the traitors land in Italy, 

They may be still tormented with unrest ; 

And from mine ashes let a conqueror rise, 

That may revenge this ti-eason to a queen 

By ploughing up his countries with the sword ! 

Marlowe. 






1. 2. 3. * Well, larbas, when this&c. . . .,Ihold 
thee alone worthy of my love. Go, each of you, away 
from the house. 

4. 5. 6. With these memorials, Elissa, burn thy 
body, and ^neas uKovaerai &c. . . . perjured &c. 

7. 8. 9. Behold here the sword, which once dmw- 
ing in &c. ... he swore a faithfid Xc'xoc. I burn 
thee fii-st, ike. 

10. 11. And lo, the cloak, which he wore once, 
landing : thee too I bid perish. 

12. 13. An<i letters (fee. ... ike. .. . this pre 
cious flame shall &c. 

14-17. Anil now, ye gods <fec. . . ., disposing all 
J18 it seems good, even if the faithless race must by all 
means go (fee. , . ., gmnt that they may never obtain 
quiet homes. 

18. 19. 20. And may the conqueror (fee. . . ., 
avenger of tricks (fee. . . ., who shall ravage (fee. . . . 
with the plough of Ares.' 



Exercise 49. 



Ark(i8. Priestess, with speed conclude the sacrifice ! 

Impatiently the king and people wait. 
Iphigenia. I had performed my duty and thy will. 

Had not an unforeseen impediment 

The execution of my pmix)se thwarted. 
A. What is it that obstructs the king's commands? 
/. Chance, which from mortals will not brook control. 
A, Possess me with the reason, that with speed 

I may inform the king, who hath decreed 

The death of both. 
/. The gods have not decreed it. 






|SKi®p£^T.''-:^tT^f'.;?^- 



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72 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



The elder of these men doth beiir the guilt 
Of kindred miinler ; on his steps attend 
Tlie dread Eumenides. They seized their prey 
Witliin the inner fane, polluting thus 
The holy sanctuar}'. I hiisten now, 
Together with my >nrgin-tr.iin, to bathe 
Diana's image in the sea, an<l there 
With solemn rites its purity restore. 

Swannnck {from GoetJhe), 

1.2.* Pnestess, quickly prepare the sacrifice, for 
the king is present <fec. 

3. 4. 5. Willing I should be obeying thee and the 
master, did not some hindi-ance by divine chance un- 
expected prevent *kc. 

6. Literal. 

7. Litei-al. 

8. 9. Show what [it is] that I may report qiuckly, 
for this is deci-eed, that the two strangers die. 

10. 11. 12. But it is not decreed by the gods, for 
the elder hath a charge of spilling (infin.) <fcc. 

13-16. Wherefoi-e the Erinyes lay wait (Xox^) for 
him, and in this temple he was shaken with a fierce 
disease, so that by its presence the man's pollution 
stained &c. 

17. 18. 19. So I go doivTi &c. ... in order that, 
having washed &c. . . ., I may purify the terrible 
IxvaoQ with holy cleansings.' 



ExiiiccisE 50. 

A duty well dischai*ged is never followed 

By sad i-epentance ; nor did your highness ever 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 73 

Make payment of the debt you owed her better 
Than in youi* late i-eproofs, not of her, but 
Those crimes that made hei- woi-thy of reproof. 
The most remarkable point in which kings differ 
From private men, is that they not alone 
Stand bound to be in themselves innocent, 
But that all such as are allied to them 
In nearness or dependence, by their care 
Should be free fi'om suspicion of all crime. 
And you Imve reaped a double benefit 
From tlus hist gi-eat act : first, in the restraint 
Of her lost plea.sui-es you remove the example 
From othere of the like licentiousness : 
Then, when 'tis known that your severity 
Extended to your mother, who dares hope for 
The least indulgence or connivance in 
The easiest slips that may pix)ve dangerous 
To you or to the kingdom ? 

Beauviont atid Fletcher, 

1. 2. * But that-which-is-owed, if one pay it well, 
should not end in (c't) bitter repentance. 

(3. 4. 5. and part of G.) And you paid not a more 
pious debt, than now by reproaching your mother, not 
herself, but the sins according to w^hich she incurred 
reproach : 

(rest of 6. 7. 8.) for in this the king most differs 
from the ^»7;ior»;c, that not only by himself he must keep 
an uninjured mind, 

9. 10. 11. but be careful of those nearest related 
by nice or preserved under [their] rule, that none shall 
incur even suspicion of blame. 

12. 13. 14. And at last you reap ifec. . . ., doing 



:^ *; 






74 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK UMBIC VERSE. 



75 



a noble [act] : first, keeping her from base pleasures, 
you removed (airiXavyw) 

(15. and part of 16.) an example that no one should 
imitate disorderly disgi'aces ; 

(rest of 16-20.) and if anyone leiirnt that you ob- 
served (partic.) accurately rit riig firfrpo^f who would yet 
hope that even the least slips would have any excuse, 
such as might raise danger for thee and thy kingdom 1 ' 



Exercise 51. 



Pvlcheria. Still in his sullen mood ? No intermission 
Of his mehmcholy fit ? 

Timanttis. It leather, madam, 

Increases than grows less. 

P. Did he tiike 

No rest, as you could guess ? 

Chrysaphiti. Not jiny, madam. 

Like a Numidian lion, by the cunning 
Of the despoi-ate huntsman taken in a toil 
And foix^d into a spacious csx^e^ he walks 
About his chamber ; we might hear him gnash 
His teetli in I'age, which opened, hollow gi-ojtns 
And murmurs issued from his lips, like ^vinds 
Imprisoned in the caverns of the earth 
Striving for liberty ; and sometimes throwing 
His body on his bed, then on the ground, 
And \nth such violence, that we more than feared. 
And still do, if the tempest of his pjissions 
By your wisdom be not laid, he will commit 
Some outrage on himself. Massimjer. 

1. 2. 3. * Is his eye still sullen — norany*kc. . . .1 



[No], for the disease of his mind rather increases than 
fades. 

4. And did not sleep take him kc. ? 

(5. — caesura of 8.) Not so ; for as some Libyan lion 
cleverly taken in the net, and forcibly shut in the 
trepifioXoQ of an enclosiu'e, he (fee. 

(Rest of 8. 9. 10.) And we might heiir <kc. . . ., 
and from opened lips he was groaning empty lamenta- 
tions, 

11. 12. 13. a terrible gi'oan, like winds (fee. • • .; 
and sometimes he throws (fee. ifec. 

14. 15. 16. And there is fear now, and then, or 
beyond fear, if you do not lull <fec. . . ., lest he sufier 
something avTo^iip.* 



Exercise 52, 

And when the dead by cruel tyrant's spite 
Lie out to ravenous bii*ds and beasts exposed. 
His yearnful heart pitying that wretched sight 
In seemly graves their weaiy flesh enclosed. 

And strewed mth dainty flowers the lowly hearse; 

Then all alone the last words did rehearse. 
Bidding them softly sleep in his sad sighing verse. 
So once that royal maid fierce Thebes beguiled. 
Though wilful Creon proudly did forbid her. 
Her brother, from his home and tomb exiled 
(While willing night in darkness safely hid her), 

She lowly laid in eai'th's all-covering shade : 

Her dainty hands (not used to such a trade) 
She with a mattock toils, and with a weary spade. 

Fletcher. 



sS&uBBjaaiiBSafr^ 



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76 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



I. 2. *And if anywhere the cruel spite of tyrants 
were to cast the dead <fcc., 

3. 4. with much respect, pitying &c. . . ., he 
heaped-up the bodies of the much-enduring with a 
tomb, 

5-8. crowning the grave <fec . . . ; and then ut- 
tered the last laments, by himself with IvaQpooQ dirge, 
singing over the beds of them quietly sleeping. 

9. 10. And thus »kc. . . ., in spite of cruel Creon, 
who had forbidden (partic), 

II. 14. who her brother cist out of <fcc. . . . 
(for safe night willingly «S:c. . . .), piously slirouds him 
in the enfolding shade of earth, 

15. 16. And unskilled in such works with deli- 
cate hand lays-hold-of &c.' 



EXEKCISE 53. 



My heart is awed within me when I think 
Of the great miracle that still goes on 
In silence round me — the perjwtual work 
Of the creation, finished, yet i-enewed 
For ever. Written on thy works I read 
The lesson of thy own eternity. 
Lo ! all gix>w old and die — but see, again 
How on the faltering footsteps of decay 
Youth presses— ever gay and beautiful youth 
In all its beautiful forms. These lofty trees 
Wave not less proudly that their ancestors 
Moulder beneath them. Oh ! there is not lost 
One of earth's charms : upon her bosom yet, 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



77 



After the flight of untold centuries, 

The freshness of her far beginning lies, 

And yet shall lie. Bryant. 

1-4. * My heart is shaken (pf.) with fear, remember- 
ing what a wonder &c. . . . through the whole earth: 
for God ceases not (aor.) from his wrought works, but 
ever renews. 

5. 6. On which a plain character has grown from 
which I know that He wUl abide for ever. 

(7. — caesura of 10.) Behold, all &c. . . .; behold 
yet again youth tracks lame old destiny and beautiful 
never rejoices not in bringing forth beautiful things. 

(Best of 10. 11. 12.) Do the races of oaks kc. . . . 
less, if the former rot below ? Notliing is gone of the 
beauties which earth produced. 

13. 14. 15. But when countless time has advanced, 
from this bosom the grace of the old yiyrritric breathes 
(aor.), and shall yet breathe.* 



Exercise 54. 



Polyphonies. What mad bewilderment of grief is this 1 
Merope. Thou art bewildered : the sane head is mine. 
P. I pity thee, and wish thee calmer mind. 
M. Pity thyself; none needs compassion more. 
P. Yet, oh ! could'st thou but act as reason bids ! 
M, And in my turn I wish the same for thee. 
P. All I could do to soothe thee has l:>een tried. 
M. For that, in this my warning, thou art paid. 
P. Know'st thou then aught, that thus thou sound'st 
the alarm ? 



■^sSv^ 



^!>SZ 



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78 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



M. Thy crime : that were enough to make me fear. 

P, My deed is of old date, and long atoned. 

3/. Atoned this very day, perhaps, it is. 

P. My final victory proves the gods appeased. 

M. O victor, victor, trip not at the goal ! 

P. Hatred and passionate env}'^ blind their eyes. 

M. heaven -abandoned \\Tetch that envies thee f 

P. Thou hold'st so cheap, then, the Messenian crown ? 

M. I think on what the futui-e hath in store. 

M. Arnold. 

1. *Art thou mad vtto XvrrrfQ'i 

2. Nay, thou doest this, and I &c. 

3. I pity thee [thinking] whither thou art gone in 
mind (gen.). 

4. Literal. 

5. If only thou hadst a mind to be prudent. 

6. Literal. 

7. Soothing thy mind I do nothing ic irXeov, 

8. Of that I pay you thanks by warning you of 

this. 

9. Knowing some fear, thinkest thou thus to 

frighten me ? 

10. Thy fiintTfjLu — it is worthy of fear. 

11. You mention (aor.) something old «kc. 

12. Literal. 

13. I prevail at last — a pix>of of pi-opitious gods. 

14. You prevail indee<l; see thou trip not. 

15. Hatred &c. . . . makes (aor.) them not seeing. 

16. Doe.s anyone envy theel You mean an <fec. 

17. Do you &c. . . . the sceptiv of this land ? 

18. I am thinking whither the future will go.' 



GREEK I.\MBIC VERSE. 



Exercise 55. 



79 



Beneath your leafy gloom, ye wa\'ing boughs 
Of this old, shady, consecrated gi*ove, 
As in the goddess' silent sanctuaiy, 
With the same shudd'ring feeling forth I step 
Afl when I trod it first, nor ever here 
Doth my unquiet spii'it feel at home. 
Long as the mighty will, to which I bow, 
Hath kept me hei-e concealed, still, as at first, 
I feel myself a stranger. For the sea 
Doth sever me, alas ! from those I love. 
And day by day upon the shore I stand, 
My soul still seeking for the land of Greece : 
But to my sighs the hollow-sounding waves 
Bring, save theii' own hoarse murmurs, no reply. 

Stoanwick (from Goethe), 

1. 2. 3. 'Into this shade of lofty trees which 
slightly move their aged head to breezes, and silent 
grove of goddess, untrodden by mortals, 

4. 5. 6. I shudder as I walk and tremble as when 
&,c. . . ., and my mind Ls not taught to love what is 
here. 

7. 8. 9. I am hidden here a long time by the will 
of gods, which <kc. . . ., and shall always be called &c. 

10. 11. 12. For the sea <tc. . . ., and often sit- 
ting (fee. . . ., I long to seetfec. 

13. 14. But the stormy billow of the sea answers 
my mourning with roaring noises.' 




HM-p 1*1 ■« 



^9.i 



W^^^^' 






80 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



81 



Exercise 56. 

Iphigeneia, when she heard her doom 
At Aulis, and when all l>eside the king 
Had gone away, took his i-ight hand and said, 
* O fjither ! I am young and veiy happy. 
I do not think the pious Calchas heard 
Distinctly what the goddess spake. Old age 
Obscures the senses. If my nui-se, who knew 
My voice so well, sometimes misunderstood 
While I was resting on her knee both arms, 
And hitting it to make her mind my words, 
And looking in her face, and she in mine, — 
Might not he also hear one word amiss, 
Spoken fi-om so fcir off, and from Olj-mpust 

W. S. Lmulor, 

1-4. These run easily enough. Remember the 
license gi-anted to such proper names as Iphigeneia. 

5-8. * Kalchas the seer does not seem to have under- 
stood well the words of the goddess : for age <Sm;. . . . ; 
come now, if my nui^se <kc. . . . sometimes did not 
undei*stand. 

9. 10. 11. When on her dear knees I used to rest 
my arms <kc. . . . if I could persuade her to tiuTi her 
mind to <kc., 

12. 13. 14. looking kc. . . ., might he not hear- 
amiss «fec. . . . etcadii' from 01}Tnpian dwellings T 



Exercise 57. 

Timon. Commend me to my loving coimti-jTnen, 
And tell them that, to ease them of their griefs, 



Their feais ui hostile strokes, their aches, losses, 
Their pangs of love, with other incident throes 
That nature's fragile vessel doth sustain 
In life's uncertain voyage, I will some kindness do 
tliem. 

S&iuUor. I like this well : he will retmn again. 

Ti, I have a ti-ee that grows here in my close, 
That mine own use invites me to cut down ; 
And shortly I must fell it : tell my friends, 
TeU Athens, in the sequence of degiee, 
From liigli to low throughout, that whoso please 
To stop aflliction, let him take his ha^ste, 
Come hither, eve the tree hath felt the axe. 
And hang himself. I pray you, do my gi*eeting. 

Shakspeare, 

1-6. * I l>id them hail : and for lightening (accus.) 
of evils, of hostile mischief, calamity, ax^t]Cu}y^ regrets 
of loves, an<l if by divine chance any storm beating- 
down strikes the hull of one journeying in the billows 
of life, tell them how I wish to benefit them. 

7. Litoral. 

8. 9. Ik^hold, a tree here flourishes in the garden, 
and my xoior <fcc. . . . 

10. 11. 12. and I will cut it. Therefore tell my 
friends and citizens in order publicly (fr i.iimn')^ ac- 
cording to worth, to the inferior {lurrepovvTio) and the 
excellent, 

13. 14, 15. whoever wishes (say — "to whomsoever 
willing it is ") to free [liimself ] from trouble, to come 
quickly before Arc. . . . kc, . . . Cto, annoimce this.* 



\ 



^T^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^: 



■'*'(*,*', 






VOCABULAEY. 



Abido, (fifxfvo). 
Abominate, mTonTva, 
About {fo S(-c.)y ^{KKav. 
Abuse, XoiSo/jco). 
Accomplish, aintTio^ KaravvTo). 
AcriLse, Kimjyop(O). 

Add, TTpOOTlBrj^l. 

Addrt'SjJ (rh.), npocrfvvfiTQi. 
Advance, Trpo;iinvo>f npo^itid- 

Afar, rrfKov. 

Afterward:*, endra. 

Aj?e, alciv. 

Agree, opoppoOfU). 

Aid (/<o«//), w^eXcta, €7ro>0€'- 

Xfi.i^ inrrjperrjfia. 
Aid ( vb.)y apf)y(t>, 
-Vir, arip. 

All-consuminpr, TTap(\>ayoi. 
All-ilestr active, rrai'tiXf^^oy. 
Alleviation, avaKovcfucn^. 
.VHot {hiico allotted) ,\ayx"»'<^« 
Ally, ^Cppaxos. 
Aloft («rf/.)» firrdp(Ttof. 
-Vlone, fiopos or poivoi. 
Aloof, (Vro'ff. 
Already, fj^rj. 
Altar, 8a>p6i. 
Amends, anoiva. 
Aniis> (^0 hear «.), napaKovo). 
Anjrer, x6\os. 
Anjrrily, tyKorcos, 
AnnoviUice, dvia. 



Answer, avrapflBopai. 

Anticipate, (pOdvio. 

Any, oaTicrovu. 

Appear, (fynluopaiy (fyavrd- 

Appearance, eiiSor, axVH^* 
Appliance, (f)dppaKov. 
Approach, oTft'xw. 
Arm (vh.), oTrXt^o). 

— a|jrainst, dp6o7r\iC<o. 

— (woM7j), (lyKaX?;, utX/urj. 
Armed {an a. ma7i),alxprjTr)s. 
Array, arparof. 

Arouse, (ydpio, €$(y€ipo>. 
Arranjre, Koa-pfto. 
Art, Tf'x^' 
Ashes, (TTToSoy. 
Ask, fpfordta. 
Assembly, navrjyvpn. 
Assessor, ^vvcBpos. 
Assured (ftp), (rdrf}' icrdi. 
Astonish, (KK\r)(T(r<o. 
Atone, dyvi(u}^ iKTivo). 
Attack (noun), nXrjyTf. 
AvBDfrer, dXdoTtop. 
Awav from, aTrd, <«ro7roff, 

Awe, (ri^as. 



Bank, ox^os. 

Barren, fprjpoty nKapnoi. 

Base, alaxpdst (ibo^os. 



I 

I 



VOCABULARY. 



83 



Battle, pAxTj {arid see Index 

of Phrases), 
Be, €ipt, ylypopaif ttAo). 
Bear, (f>(poi. 
Ifeast, $j]p, Br)piov. 
Beat-down (neut.)^Karaiyl(<»i. 
Iteauty, KuXXof, KaWovT). 
Become, ylyvopat ; {part.) 

yrya>i. 
Ifed, \ixoSy XfKTpnVy (vprj. 
Before {ofpwiitiim), (p7ro8o)v. 

— {fime)j TrdpoSfTrdpoide. 
Begret, ^vw. 

Beguile, ^cXeVro. 
Belied {to be), yj^fybopai. 
Bellow, oTfvo). 
Belong, npo(Tr]K<o. 
Bend, KapTrro). 

Benetit (t'ft.); etrepycWw, ok^c- 
Xfo). 

— {noun), u}<f)(\rjpa, 

Jfereft, TT)TO>p€VOS. 

Betray, irpoSiScopu 
Betrayed, Xw^Trdf. 
Beyond, napd, ntpa {(fen.). 
Bid, KfXfi'a), oTc'XXo). 

Billow, KKvhmVy KKvbtiVLOV. 

Bind, deo), avvhi<i>. 

Birth, ycVfo-tff. 

Bitter, niKpdi. 

Black, p(\a^ ; {b.-aJdnnfd) 

piKdyxpoiS. 
Blacken, p€\aip<o. 
I51ame, >/^(>yoy, alria. 
Blast {nouji), pnrq. 
Bless, 0X3/^0). 
Blest, fi^XeoTOf. 
Blind, rv</)Xdj'. 
Blood, alpa. 
Bloody, ntpaTqpvi. 
Blush, (pvSpuioi. 
Body, (Tclipa, dipas ; {dead b.) 

V€Kp6Sf PtKVS. 



Bold {to be), Bapaeay. 

Bolt, /3Aor. 

Bone, doT 'op. 

Born, yeyd)? ; (^o fte) €(j)vPf 

fK^Xaardpo). 
Bosom, KoXiros. 
Both, (ip(j)(i}. 
Bough, K\d8os. 
Boundary, opos. 
Bound-up, dpdberos. 
Break 6pava) ; {broken-up) 

(TVPTfOpavapfPos. 
Breast, Kapfii'a, Kap8ias pv^os 
Breathe again, dpanpfo). 
Breathing, nporjy rrpevpia. 
Breed, rtArro), 
Breeze, avpa^ nporj. 
Bright, <^ai§pdff. 
Brighten, XapTrpvva. 
Brightness, afXas. 
Brilliancy, Xapnporrjs. 
Brilliant, Xap-npoSf ^wcr^ri- 

pos. 
Bring-up, TpfKfxa ; {bronyht- 

Up) €PTpO(f)Ot, 

Broil, Opuos. 

Brook {fioun)f 7r7da$, 

— {vb.)y <^iXa>. 

Brother, aSfX^.'y, Kaais, 

KuaiyprjToSj (rvyyopoi. 
Brow, o(t)pvs. 
Bud, ap3os. 

Burden, (fidpro^, ^dpos. 
Burn, <p\€y(Oj eVt^Xeyo), 

vTraiOoi ; {b. to chtders) 

aWaXoco. 
Bury, BdTTToi. 
Buy, (7rpuip,Tjp. 



Calamity, <Tvp(f>opd, ^vcmpa- 
Calcine, KaTap$paK6<o, 



o 2 



■i 









■V'' 



84 



VOCABULARY. 



Call, /lofrxos. 

Call, KoXfo. 

Calm (/'</;.), vT}VffWi, 

Captain, Xox«*yoj« 

Captive, atx^aXwroy, 6c'- 

Care, <j)povrU. ^cpt^ra: (i/ m) 

Careful (/o he)^ evXa^eo^ai, 

Carelessness, jjaOvnia. 

Cam*, nvdyoi^ >fo/uiifca. 

Cast-off, €»c3iiXXa>. 

Cease, Xrjyto. 

Cedar, iceSpos. 

Ci'9«ation {from foil), apyla. 

Chain, Sffr/mo?. 

Chance {noun), ri'^i?*, i^b.) 

Tvy\av<o, 
Chaii|?t* (i"h.), oXXoo-tro), 

/jirr<AX{i(r<ra), fifTn3aXXa) 
— {nnun)^ dWiiyrf. 
Character, x<'^^"f^P' 
Charge {imun), alrUi. 
Charm, S(\ktt)(hov. 
Cheek, iraprjii. 
Chief, tipeios, npopLOi. 
Child, TiKvov, rraU, vrjiriot. 
ChoO;<e {onf if), f(aip€opai. 
Chosen, (KKpiros. 
Circle, kCkXo^. 
Citizen, u<TT09. 
Cleansinjr {noun), Ka6app.6s. 
Clever, (To(pos. 
Clip, Ko\ov<i>, 
Cloak, (jidpoi, x^"'*'"- 
Clotho, dfiKfX^- (ifxni(TX<o. 

Cloud. V€<f)Oi, V«p€\TJ. 

Cluster, t^oTpvf. 

Cold {i*ubif.), Kpvos; (adj,) 

ylrvxpos. 
Collect, (TVi'dyay, e^adpai^at. 
Come, (pxofiai, xwpfw ; {have 

c.) TJKio; (c. ujton) <V<>- 



Comforter, jrapTyopoy. 
Command (I'h.), KfXcvco, 

fW/XXo). 
— {noun)^ €VTo\r}, ((prrprj. 
Commit (rnmr), (Knpdaarat, 
Common, koipos, ra^tivos. 
Companion, eraipos. 
Company, oxXo?, npikla. 
Company avf4idW<o. 
Compassionate, oiKTtppoiv. 
Compel, dpayKd(<o. 
Complainin<r, nfvStpoi. 
Complete, T7iivT€\T}s. 
Confer {fncovr Sfc), (/>epw. 
Confound, rrvyx'^o^* 
Conquer, vt<f«a>. 
Conqueror, o viK<iiv. 
Conscious, awtihun. 
Consecrate, KaBifpoto. 
Consider, aKfrnfcj. 
Conspirator, crui/w^onyj. 
Consul, 7rpO(TTdTr)i. 
Contention, Brfpa. 
Cook (rb.), iriaatd. 
Corpse, vtKpo^y I'tKvi, 
Counsel, liovXfvpa; (j//-c.) 

^I'fTiSot'Xia. 
Counterfeit, Kif^^TJkos. 
Countless, di/T]pi0pos, pLvpios. 
Courage, /icVos, fv\//"vxia. 
Courageous, (voTrXayxvos. 
Cousin, dvfylfiog. 
Cn\ft, 8oXof , Ttx*^' 
Creep, r/wro). 
Crest, Xo(/)os. 
Crime, ApapTia, 
Crowd, (cXtifov. 
Crown {nouv), (rrc</>ov. 
Cruel, (l/ioy, u>^6<j)pa>v. 
Cry, fiodo} ; {cry rcirh) arypL- 

iiodu>', (idtfiul) eVoXoXi'^o). 
Cunning, m^uXos, 7 cpovpyos^ 



VOCABULARY. 



85 



Cup, SfVaff. 

Curse, dpd. 

Custom, vdpns ; (t/ is cusfom- 
(inj) popi^erai. 



Dainty, €^<tip(Tos. 
Dale, uyK09. 
Damp, vypos. 

Dance, x*'P*^^' 
Dan^'Cr, /ctVf^ei'or, Ktv^vpevfta. 
Dangerous, (iriKip8vpo9. 
Dare, ToX/x<iu) {aor. (tXijp). 
Daring (''<(/.)» ToXprjpos, 

TTUVToKpOS. 

— (subs.), $pd(roi. 
Dark {ndj.)^ aKor^iPo^, d(f)€y- 
yj;s, (Ipavpos. 

Dart {vb.), fpaiciyirruf. 
Dawn, opOpoPffoii (Puxrifydpot, 
Day, rjfjiap, rjpipa ; {daily) 

KOT ^pap, KuB' fjpepap. 
Deatl {the)y oi Bapdpret, ol 

K€KpTJKdTff. 

Deadly, Bapdatpos. 

Debt, x/^'^^- 

Decay {vb.), <^Bipu>, dp.avpd- 

opal. 
Decreed {it is d.), df^oKrai, 
Deed, fpyop, npaypuy tpypa. 
Deeply-roaring, jiapv^popos. 

rooted, (iaBvppi(os. 

Deface, ^ui(f)B€ip(a. 
Del eat, t)aad<o. 
Defile, pvaipu>. 
Deign, d^idoi, roX/iuo). 
Delicate, dpipos. 
Deliver, \v<o. 
Deliverer, acorrip. 
Demigod, Bfois 6po7os dvrjp. 
Deprive, arfpfui. 
Depth, ^Bosy[Mds. 



Desire, €vxopai. 
Det^tined, ir^Tipujpivos. 
Destiny, pdpo^. 
Destroy, (pBdpo}, d7r(>(j)Bfip(o, 
e^anoipBeipo), oXXi'/xi, e'^di'tr- 

TOIO. 

Destruction, ^uKJiBopd, 

Determine, opi^oi. 

Devilish, dvoa-io^. 

Dew, hpoaui. 

Die, Bt'i}(TK(o ; (d. tcith) avif^ 

BprjaKU). 
Dill'er, 8ia(f)(p(i). 
Dig, (TKUTTTUi, KaTaa-KUTrra). 
Dirge, Bprji/cobia* 
Dirty, dvaniprjs. 
Disbelieve, imioTtoi. 
Disclo5?e, (jjiui'd). 
Discourse {i<ub.), l^taWayrf. 
Disease, poaros, pdarjpa. 
Disembark, (Kiiaipo). 
Disgrace {cb.), Kuraiaxvpio. 

— {noun), aL(Tx*>s, oP€i8os, 
Disgraceful, alaxpds. 

— {adv.), aiirxp^Sy (ila-x^o^i'a- 
Disorderly, uKuapos, 
Dispose, Kpaipo). 
Disposition, Xrjp^a, ^Bos, rpo' 

nos. 
Distribute, I'tpo. 
Disturb, rapda-a-o). 
Divining, Tfpda-KOTros. 

Do, TTOteO), 8pd(t), iph(C, p€(oi. 

Domestic, oiKeTrjs. 
Double, StTrXor?. 

— (adv.), Siacrois. 
Draw,o-7rda) ; {d. breath) t Xkw. 
Dread {adj.)y Seipos. 
Dream, opap, opeipos. 
Drink, mpto ; (« health) npo- 

TTIPCO. 

Drive, (Xuvpa) ; {out) f^e- 
Xavp<£. 



•I 'l^ 



1 2L 'V""' 



!Sr->--. 






86 



VOCABULAKY. 



Drop, araycov, o-rtiXay^a. 
Dnig, (pdpfiaKov. 
Dry-up, avaivo). 

Due, TTpfTTUiV. 

Dull (f/^), «7rn/i3Xui'(i). 
Dumb, a(f>o>vos. 

Dust, (TTToStis-, fCnftS, KOPia. 

Dwell, paifo, niK€io, KaToiKfO). 
— {in), fVoMce'uj ; {with) avv- 
niKeo). 



I'ftirer, o|v?. 

I'lairle, alfroi. 

Kurtli, yrj, yaiaj x6<i>v, nt^ov. 

l\a8torn, cwoy. 

Kat,fV^i&>; (mefaph.) ^pixui. 

I'lducate, TraiSeuo). 

I'Uther, cVdre^oy. 

I'.lder, 6 irpoade y^vvrjOus. 

I'Udest, ytpaiTaTOi. 

llucircle, fy<v»cXoa>. 

Knclose, c7py(D. 

1 '.uclosure, tpKos. 

ICnd {^ubs.)f TfKos. 

— {vb.) TfXevrao). 

I'adure, ai/t'xo/iat ; («7<*"-) 

tX^/xi. 
Kiiduring, fUTXij/iwi'. 
Kuomy, f'x^poy. 
iMitulding, 7rfptTrTvx»?J. 
JOnquire, e^rrafa>. 
ICutreat, rrapaiTfiOf (rvvrjyo- 

p€(0. 

I*'ntru9t, eVir/jeVo). 

llnvious, <l)0op€p6s. 

KuVY, (pdovoi. 

I'qually, ($ In-ov. 

liveninjr {fxi})^ ftnrf/iof ; 

]Over (/«/•)> ^** aiwvwv. 
ICver-flowinfT, dfipx/ro^. 
Kverywhere, navraxo^. 



Evident, Sij\os] (adv.),€y(f>a- 

vcof, fvapyios. 
Exalted, v^/rj^yopof. 
Example, napahdyna, 
Exct'l, TTfptaiTfva). 
Excellent, dpicrrevfov. 
Excite, f'lraipu). 
Excuse, (TvyyvoypT), (rvyyvoia. 
Expect, KapaboKtoi. 
Extent (fo what ?), rrol. 
Exterior, ij t^oi (jivtj. 
Eyelid, idi\((f)apov. 



Face, TTpoacoTTou j {in the f.) 

tvdvTwv, 
Fade. KaTa(^Biv<D. 
Failure, a-ipakfia. 
Fair, (virpdnjs. 
Fall {vb.), iriimo, •trlrvto, 

rrpoTTtTPOi. 
— («mA.<.), nfcrtjpxi. 
False, «7r(aTof. 
Fame, icX/of; (»V/-/.) SiV- 

icXfta. 
Far-otl", 'ir6pp(oB€v. 

seen, rqXoOfv KaT6y\nos. 

Fashion, TrXatro-oj. 

Fate, aicra, poipa. 

Fated, popa-iposr flpappiivos. 

Fatted, o-ircvros. 

P^ivourable, (vp,€vr)s. 

Feast, Salf, €opTT). 

Feed, ^6(rK<o. 

Fenced, {part, of) (fipda-a-o). 

Few, iravpoi, oXiyos. 

Fiery, irvpTrvom. 

Fill, nXrjpoo), TtipTrXrjpAj 

vnepTripirXrjpi. 
Find, €vpi(TKo, ifevpiaKO). 
Fine, #caXof. 

Fittinjj^ {to be), npoarqKca. 
Fixed (to be), irim^ya. 



VOCABULARY. 



87 



Flame, </)X6^. 
Flash {vb.), dfrrpinrrto. 
Flatter, Ba^fvu). 
Flatterer, «>X(i|. 

Fligrht, </>io"i- 
Flock, noipmj. 

Flood, €irippoT}. 
Flourish, ^JaXXo). 
Flow, pe'o). 
Fly, (jifvyd), 7rpo(})€vy<o. 

Fold, KoKnOS, TTTV^. 
Follow, (TVVtTTOpMI,, 
Foot, TTOl'ff. 

Forbid, aiTfpw {ft^t.). 
Force, ^la. 

Foreig:n, (idp^apos, |<Vos. 
Foreknow, npooi^a. 
Foreshew, 7rpoS((*cta'/ii. 
Forest, vdiroi. 
Forestall, (fyOdvcj. 
Foretell, 7rpo(j)r]pi. 
Forget, XavOavopai. 
Forgotfulness, XijOij. 
Forgive, a-vyyiyvuxTKO}. 
Forlorn, BinrSaipoiv. 
Former, 6 npoa-Bev, 
Fortunate, €vtvxt)s. 
Fortune, tvx*?- 
Foul, avxprjpos. 
Foundation, liddpov. 
Foui'i'oOted, TeTpaa-KfXrjs. 
Free {to set), Xuo), napaXixo, 

€K(v$(p6(t). 
Frequent {vb.), </)oiraa). 
Frozen, Kpva-TaWoTn)^. 
Fruitful, KupTTipoi. 
Fruitiest?, uKapTriaTos. 
Fultil, (KiripTrXrjpi. 
Furrow, uXo^. 
Future, to piXXov, 



Gain, Krdopai. 



Gall, xo^'7' 

Gate, ttvXt]. 

General, arparrjyog. 

Gentle, 7rp€vp€vrjs. 

Ghost, eiSwXoi/. 

Gift, yepas. 

Give, dldapi, eTTopov. 

Glitter, p,appaip(o. 

Glory, »cXeoy,5()|a; {(florious) 

kX(iv6s. 
Gnash, iipvKUi, 
Go, tpoXov, dpi ; (</o on) 

TTfpaivopai ; {ffo down) 

KadiKveopai. 
Godlike, dclos. 
God-sent, Qfon^pirros. 
Golden, 7roXi';(pi'o-oy, XP^^V' 

Xaros. 
Gone, <^poCSo9 ; (/ am g.) 

OLXopai. 
Good-fame, et'So^ta. 
Gracious, (veLdrjs. 
Grandfather, ndTnros. 
Grant, a-vyx<>ip<t>' 
Grass, ;(Xo)p6i/ irdbov, xXori. 
Grave (subs.), rvpfios, Td(f)ost 

— {adj.) aepvos. 
Green, ;)(Xa)pos. 
Grey, yXavKos. 
Grieve, Ximeco {tram, ). 
Grievous, dXyavos] {comp.) 

aXylinv. 
Grind, aXfo). 
Gripe, Xap^dvco, Xap^dvopai 

{qen.). 
Groan, crrei/o), UTroo-rez'a^o). 

— {noun), (TT€vaypa. 
Ground (on the), ;(a/xai7rrn7$'. 
(trove, aXaos, vdirrj. 
Growth, (3Xa(TTT). 

Guard, ^vXao-o-o). 
Guess, f iVo^o), €7rf LKd^d). 
Guest, (rvvdaiT(i)p. 







W^/i:-.:.'-^jf^t;--'-fs^ 



-^« J.--*. , -<:^^^^^J^^^^- jjf^ifjjjorjfl 






'-'S^fy>%'- " 






v:«" 







-, f .-" 



88 

Guide, oSayrk. 



VOCABULARY. 



VOCABULARY. 



89 



Ilftlf-dead, ijfxi6uf)s. 
Hanpii;r, fcpffiafrrof. 
Hang-o 1 leself. ?iiprjv aTrapTao). 
Ilapp^'U, Tvyxdvo}^ KVf)fo>, 

(TVUhiaivo}. 
IlappV, evyrjOrji. 
Hard, o-xXiy/joy. 
Ilate, /ico-eo). 
Hateful, (xOf)os. 
Hatefulues*, fiTo-o?. 
31au|.'hty, V7r€)>(/>p(«>»'. 
Ht^ad, Acapn, >fp(iy. 

HeaUiifr, Treuwi'iof. 
Heap-up, oyKoo), x***"*^/**' 
Hear, kXvo) {nnp. k\vBi)j 

aKOva. 
— {ami.<<), irnpnKovoi. 
Heart, Kap?iin. 
Heaven-abandoned, Beofrrv 

dwollin;?, ovpavovxoi. 

Heavy, /:^f>t-p ; (to be) j:ipiCa, 
Heed {take h, of), /ji«X€i /xoi 

{(fen.), 
Hed'^re (iw), (jipaaaa). 
Help, (ipn^ts. 
Herald. Kr}pv^, 
Hero, €v$ud(. 
Hereal'ter, riineiTa. 
Hide, Kpv-rrrcii, cy^cpuTrro), 

aTTOK/Ji'TrTa), (rvy*caXixra). 

— {be hidden) y \av3uv<o. 
TIi|lb {7nosf)y vx/^toroy. 

— (//. road)j TrXoTfTa iccXcv- 

— {h.soided) vylrrj\6<f)p(ov. 
Hill, opof, X(K/)nc, fi^^oy. 
Hindrance, kcoXv^. 

Hold, <7r«x« ; ("" '<') "'^«X- 



uTTTo/im; { = esfeem) v(p(o; 

{fi. vhe/tp) vip(ii -nap ovbiv. 
Hollow, KoWoi, 
Holy, (Tfpivoiy ciyfdff. 
Homeward, oucaSc. 
Honoured, ripios. 
1 lope, A7riC«. 
Horror, (^pUt). 
1 lorseman , tTTTro-n/s. 
Hull, iTKiidiOi. 
Human, tii/^pwTrti'os, di/^pco- 

TTftoy. 

Humble, ranavoi. 



Idlenef^**, npyi'a. 

Ignorance, rryj/oto; (m iVjr.) 
> ■»* » 

OVK ClOCdf. 

Tjmorant (/" 6f')» (lyvn^ot. 

Ill (Vo ^<'), I'OO-CO). 

Ill-omened, bvcrffyrfpof. 
IlluhLriou.-*, fiVXei'/sr. icXfti'dff. 
Imag"e, c tVa)*/, «r^a>Xoi/^ j^ptras. 
Imitate, piptopin. 
Immortal, ti(f)6iTns, lip^poros. 
Impediment, «ca>Ai'fw. 
Impossible, «/ii7X«''os') aSuw- 

TOS. 

Impulse, opprj. 
Iucant<itinn, eVw^f/. 
Incredulou-i, (Trrurros. 
Incur, dc^Xtcncavo). 
Incurable, nio^icecrTor. 
Inexperienced, aidpn. 
Infant, vtjttios. 
Inferior, rjaa-ttyVy Xorptf. 
Inhalnt, vai<i>. 
Injustice, ddiKia. 
Insult, Vfipis. 
Intem}M'rate, iiKoXacrTos, 
Intend, (fypnvtui, votto. 
Intermission, TraOXa. 






Livade, fViSaXXw. 
Invesrijrate, <^€r«C<»« 
Invisible, acfmi^os. 



Jealous (to be)f (j)Bovt<a. 

Join, arvvdirroa. 

Journey {(doiuj), 6Boiirop€(o. 

Joy, x«P«- 
Judfrment, yiwprj. 
Justice, dUt], ra dUata, 
Justly, biKai<t>ii diKt}, 

Keep, Tpc'c^w; {mcay from) 

arrei/yyw, diravbdiii. 
Kill, tcTiivoiy dvaipiio. 
Kind, TTpdns, rjnios, evpetnjs. 
Kin^', Tvpnvvofy tiva^y ^aai- 

Xfvf, Koipavos. 
Kingdom, dpdvos. 
Kiu<rly» t^aaiXiKOiy TvpavviKus. 
Kinsman, opatpos, avyyovos. 
Know, €ni(rrapMi, €$€TriaTa- 

p.ai. 



Laborious, ^apv^. 

Lalx)ur {cb.), /iox^<<*)» rroWo) j 
(noun) TTovos, pioxOos, 

Lake, Xt/iivi/. 

Lamb, iipva {accus.). 

Lame, x<^Xdf . 

Lament, icXaiw. 

Lamentation, ydof. 

Last, voTarosj {at I.) reXfu- 
riiv {ayreviny with sub- 
ject). 

Lasting, tppfpSyp. 



Ljltely, npuirjv. 
Laugh, y^Xdo). 
Laughter, laughing-stock. 



Law, Beapds. 

Lawful, €vvopos. 

Lead, ayo). 

Leader, dyds. 

Leaf, (jivWov. 

Leap, aXXo/xat. 

Learn, pav6uv(0j €KpavOdv(t>. 

Leave, aTroXetTro), Xcittco , 

{alone) dcfylrjpi. 
Leisure, o-xoX/;. 
Lend, davd^w, eTTopov. 
Lengthen, prjKvv<o. 
Let, piaOow. 

Let-go, p^6ir)pi, 

fall, Ka6ir)pi. 

Letter, c'moToXj'/. 
Life, /iioy, iu>r), (oi). 
Light {subs.)y (pdosf (jycos, 
(jieyyos. 

— {adj.)y Kovcpos, 

minded, kov^ovovs. 

Light {ali(/hf)y aKriTma. 
Lighten, Kovipi^fo. 
Lightening, dvaKov(j)i(ri9. 
Like (vb.), npoaTjKdprjv. 

— {coiij.), 0)9, out, oxnrfp. 

— {prep.),hiKj)v {yen.^y opoia 
{(lat.). 

— {adj.), foiKuts. 
Limb, pe'Xoff. 
Limit, T€ppa. 
Link (i"^.), C^vyiiipLi. 
Lip, xfiXoy. 
Little, piKpofy ^atos. 
Live, ^u'cD, (f)dos fikino). 
Lock, TrXoKupos. 
Loftily, vyj^iKopiTois. 
Lofty, vyIriyevvrjTos, uKpos. 
Lofty-towered, vy^r'nrvpyoi. 
Long {time), bapov. 

— (cb.)y no6((o, Ipdpopiu. 
Long-continued, paKpaitov. 
JjOokfbdpKopai', {at) elaopdia. 






0, 



I,' 



.iW 






90 



Look (tw/pr/.\ 'Hov. 
l/)se, fiTToXXv/xi. 
Lot, /xutpa. 

— {have by /.), \ayxavtd. 
Lmd-roaiinjjT, (:iapvfipo^ns. 
Love {siibs.), TToOoSf tpcos. 

— {object of /.)i Too-iy, icd^i?. 

— (t'ft.), fV"<»'» (TTtpyoi. 
Lovely, fvOnXtjs, (paa-pios. 
Lovin^', fv(fiiKT]i, 

Lull, KOipi^O). 

Luxury, x^i^- 

MaddeiU'd, pavtii. 
Madmau, dvijp tp7r\r}KTos. 
Madnes!?, pavia. 
Maid, ndud^vof. 
Maimed, x<^Xoy. 
Mainland, t)n€ipo^. 
Majestical, TvpavviKo^. 
Make, -iroUta ; {factitive) 

Tldqpi. 

Male, ap(rT)v. 

^Slane, x"*^- 
Manhood, dv^pda. 
Manly, dvdpixds. 
Mant'ion, 8u)p,a. 
March, iidais. 
Mast, iOToy. 
Master (vb.)^ fieoTro^o). 

— (woMJi), bfO-TTorrjifKoipavos. 
Mattock. ydTjts, 
Meadow. X^ipciv- 

Mean (r6.), Xcyw, 6(\a}\ {by 

all in.) TrdvToiS. 
Meanwhile, re'coy. 
Measure (w.), pirpov. 

— (y6.), prrpfcj, tKperpifa. 
Meet, «Wi7x"»'*^ (</♦«?«.). 

— (7jp«/.) a-vvipxnpaiy (rvv^ 

Memorial, p.vTJpa. 



VOCABULARY. 



VOCABULARY. 



91 



iSferciful, olicripp^v. 
Merciless, avoiicroi. 
Miduijrht (/«//. ) . /if trouiicriop. 
Mifjhty, pfyaa-dfvt'ii. 

Mild, ijptpos, tjtTVXOS' 

Milk, y«Xa. 

Mill, pvXij. 

Mind, (PpT}Vy Ovpos. 

Minjjfle, piymjpi, difapiywpif 

(rvp(f>vpci. 
Mischief, HTT). 
Miser}', rv\r) dvabalpau. 
Mia8, TTo^coj. 
Moderate, crux^pttiv. 
Moist, vypos. 
Moment, apiKpu^ xP^'*'^^* 
Monimient, 6t)Kij, Otjktj npo- 

yoV(t)V. 
Moon, firjvrjf (rcXijw;. 
More, n'Kfov. 
Mortal, ^poTof. 
Mother, rj TfKOiKTa. 
Mound, r^•fl^oy. 

— heaped, n'/ifSox&xTTor. 
Mountain, opoy, Kprjpifos. 

— {adj.), 6o€tv6s. 

Mourn, bvpofxai, (rrtvia, ir^v 

Mourning'', fiprjvos. 
Move, Kivfoi. 

Much-enduring-, rroXXa rKds. 
Murderous, </)oii/u>s. 
Murmur, icAnSoy. 

Must, xt^^i ^«t» xi^^^^' 
Mutter, pv((o. 



Name, nvopn. 
Nameless, dviowpoi, 
Narrow, arfvui. 
Native, (p(j}VTns. 
Nature, (f)vaii. 
Nay ratlier, p(v ovv. 






Near, ntXas, w^rja-tov, fryx*. 
— (adj.) J n\T)(rios. 
Neck, 8(pr]. 

Need, x/>*t« (J^i<*f'^ ^« ";)> ^"• 
Neither, ovbfTfpm, prjbfTipos. 
[Mind which you use.'] 

Net, hiKTVOVy 81KTVOV lipKV€S. 

New, Kiiivds. 
Nijrhtin^'ale, drj^uyv. 
Noble, evyevTjs. 
Noise, bovKoi. 

Noonday {adJ.)fpf(Tj)piipiv6s. 
N«ite, fieXof, /ieXcpSi'a. 
Nourish, Tpe(f)u}. 
Nowhere, ovSapov. 
Number, dpi6p6s. 
Nurse, rp6(poSf Tpo(f>€vs. 



Oak, dpvi. 

Obedience, ndOapxia. 
Ohli-ratiou, x«P'^* 
Obscure, dpfiXvvw. 
Obscurity, dpLavpoxris. 
Observe, Tr^peuf (rKon€Ci>. 
Obstinacy, av6abia. 
Obstruct, (prrohiCto. 
Oflsprin<r, ydvm. 
Old, ye/jaiof , yipoiVy TraXatoy, 

7r«/\at<^aT0ff. 
— (wiflw), y^poiVy yfpalrepoSf 

naXiuds. 
Omnipotent, TrayKparrjf. 
Once, oTra^, eiVaTTti^ ; {at o.) 

O/Xof', UVTiKU. 

One - auother,<tXXoy — aWns. 
Onward, npoaoi or nopa-a. 
Open, Sioiyo), dvotyca. 
Oppoilunity, Katpos. 

Oracle, xp^^t^^^' 

Order {vb.),'irpd(t)r)pi {rrpofl- 

irov); {in or.) €^«|^ff. 

Otherwise, aXX<us. 



Our, dpos. 
Outrage, v/3pij. 
— {vb.), v^piiio. 
Overcloud, o-fcui^o). 
Overcome, Kpareco. 
Overlook, nepiopdo). 
Overshadowed, KardcrKioi. 
CVwe, 6<f>(i\<o. 
Ox, /SoOs. 



Papers, ypdppara. 
Pardon, a-vyyiyvojarKO). 
— {noun), (TvyyvoM. 
Parent, tok^vs. 
Part (yt.), diaipeoi. 
Pass-by, napepxopai ; {over) 

TTfpdcu. 

Passion, ttu^os. 
Past, 6 onta-deu. 
Pattern, Trapa^elypa. 

Pause, eVe'x***- 

Pay, TiVo), iKTivoa. 

Peace, elpr,vf], (vbia, yakrfvrj. 

Peal, /cXayyci). 

Perceive, alcr6dvop,ai. 

Perfect, r^Xftof. 

Perform, 8pd<o. 

Perish, oXXupot, (pBivo). 

Perjured, 4-niopKos. 

Persist, SiarcXe'o). 

Persuade, nciOu). 

Pillar, crrriKr). 

Pine, nirus. 

Pious, €V(Ti^r}S. 

Pirate, ^tjo-tt^s. 

Pity (vb.), niKTiCco, iiTOiKTi^a). 

Place, Tonos. 

— {vb.), itrrlBrjpi. 

Plague, v6iro£. 
Plainly, dnXios, a*co/x>(/"cos. 
Plant, <\>vrov. 
Play, rroiXw. 



^1 












•s W ''",■*< ** ■"*»' 






kr:»5j< 



92 



VOCABULAHY. 



Please. ap€(TK(t>j {he pi.) rjbo- 

Pleasant, T€/)7ri/oj, f}8vs. 
Pleasure, rjfioinj. 
Plou^'hshav»\ <1f)nTf}ov, 
Plunder, Afyrrayi]. 
Pollute, fxiuivco. 
Pollution, fiiacrfia. 

Poor, TTfinji. 

Port, ^f^as. 

Position, 6((Tis. 

Possess, KaTf\(ip. 

Possible, 0105 T€. 

Poiu', cTreVfiu). 

Powerful, Kparaiot, 

Practise, rio-ic/a), fifXrrao). 

Pl*ais«\ nlvfo), (Traivfo). 

— (suh.) emuvoi. 

Pray, evxotJ^ai; {prayer) 

TTfioaTpOTrr]. 
Precious, rZ/tioy, (iTip.os. 
Prepare, aprvvtOf (Trucrdopat, 

rropavvu}. 
Prescribe, fTT(n\i^ij>. 
Pre^^ence, napova-in. 
Preservation, (ruyTrjpla. 
Preserve, o-wCw. 
Present (/o be), 7rup€Lfii, 
Prevuil, Kparfto. 
Prevent, Ka>Xi/a>, elpya 
Pride, oyKOs. 
Priest, i(p€vi. 
Priestess, Upia. 
Prime, aKpr). 
Primeval, iTp<i>Tapxoi. 
Prisioner, dtapnoi* 
Privilege, yipa^. 
Proceed, aruxu). 
Progenitor, yonj, irpoyovos. 
Promise, vttio-x^M^*' 
Promontory, -npiov. 

Proof, i\(yXOS, TfKpMpy TCK- 
flTJplOV. 



Prophecy, p.avT(7ov. 
Prophetic, fiuvTiKos, Trpo/uiai/- 

TtS. 

Propose, rrp6(l)t]pt. 
Prosperous ( to be)^ evrvxito. 
Prove, iXfyxi^. 
Pro\erb, nupuifiia. 
Prudent, (T6i(ppu}v, TrpoprjBrjs. 
Punish, KoXa^b). 
Pure, tiyvos, 
Purilicatiou, KiiOapyia, 
Purify, ityvi(<ii. 
Pui'sue, biu>K<ii. 

Push, (l)$<a). 



Queen, tivna-aay fiacriXU, 
Quiet, tKTjXos. 



Kace, yfvm. 

Kage {vb.), 6vp,6opai. 

l\iv/m*rf papyiov. 

llli<^>, pUKT]. 

Kaise, 6p66<i>, atpo), €7roip(Oy 

e'-yft'/jo), f^eyitpu). 
ltanJ\, Tu^is. 
llapt, dpnaa^fis. 
Ravage, ripvu). 
Kay, avyrj. 
Itazor, ^vpnv. 
Heap, i^apdui. 
Reappear, dva(f)aivnpai. 
Reared, (yrpu<f)os. 
Itebuke, ^oyof. 
Receive, Sexopmiy XapfidviOy 

Reckon, \nyl(opiai. 
Recognise, yt/o}pi(u>. 
Recttrd, (yypd(f)Qi ; (of»JtT01v) 

(iTTo^vpopai. 
Redden ( neut.)^ (f>oivi(T(To^ai, 
Reed, duva^. 



VOCABULARY. 



93 






Refreshment, dvayfrvxri. 
Region, xwpa. 
Regret, TTo^oc. 

— {vb.) 7rod(<t>. 
Reign, upx^y KpaTi<a. 
Rein, fivla. 
Reject, ciTTO^aXXw. 

Rejoice, x^^H^^- 
Related, trpoaqKoiv. 
Relieve, aKtupnu. 
Remainder, \oI(t6iov, 
Remember, pfpvrjyLai, p.V€lav 

Remit, iraptrjpt. 
Renew, Kaivoo). 
Repair, Kov(piCoi. 
Repay, dvridi^oipi. 
Repentance, pfrdyvoia. 
Report, dirayyfWo). 

— {nubs.) <f>r)pr}- 
Reproach, oveidi^<Oy €^ovfi- 

— {subs.) oj/fi^oy. 
Reputation, bn^a. 
Require, xPTlC<»'> §c«/i««' 
Ivesist, dpvvdOo^i, 
Respect, aibcis. 
Resplendent, (j)ai8p6s. 
Rest, rravXa, awiTravXa, dp- 

TTVOrj. {the r.) Til XotTTrt. 

— {r>h.) fpft'^o). 
Restrain, (tpyo), /ca^f/pyco, 

KaTfx*^- 
Return, Kor^pxopaiy nv€ip.i. 
Reverence, affiia. 
Reverent, oi^oio?. 
Reward, dptiiiop^ai. 
Rich (make /•.), TrXoirrtfo). 
Uijrhlei'uslv, (v^Ikoh. 
Ripe, TT^Troji', (/.) ■ni-ireipa. 
Rise up, dviarapLQi. 
Rising {of ifun), di^roXat, 

dvToXai. 



River-marge, pfWpov irapaK- 

TIOV. 

Road, 686s. 

Roaring, jSpvxf-os. 

Rob, (TvXdoi. 

Robe, (TToXr), 

Rocky, KparaiXfOis. 

lioof, areyrf. 

Rot, ay)7ro}f (rr)7ropai. 

Rotten, crnOpos. 

Riun, Smc^r^opd, (^Oopdy oXe- 

6pos. 
Rule-over, Tupawfi'wjKpar/w. 
— {subs.) tipx"?" 
Rush-forth, €^nppdop,ai. 
Rustle, ylrn(f)eo>. 



Sacrifice {vb.). Bvo). 

— (w.), ip6v, 6vpa. 
Safe, dcrfjiaXTjs, 
Sail, TrXtoi. 
Sailor, vnvnXos. 

Sake (for n. of), X"P"'> ^f«T-t. 

Salt, dXfff. 

Sanctuary, pn'xos. 

Sane {to fje), (fipovfo. 

Satisfaction, Kopns. 

Savage, uypiot. 

Say, Xf-yo), <f)drrK(tiy (jirfpi. 

Scarcely, poyis. 

Sceptre!^ - bearing {mhs.), 

(TKTllTTOVxiH' 

Sea {suba.), dXs, OdXaa-aay 
TTovToSt (rdXov. 

— {(idj.) noirrins, daXa(T<Tios. 

— idol, Oeos 6aXd(T(rios. 
Season, Koipds. 
Second, 8(vT€pns. 
Secretly, Kpix^Oy Xddpa, 
Seciye, ^if^awoi. 
Seed, (TTToptt. 

See, jiXfTToi, BiBopKa, 






i;.'-kfj 



. vMaaaMiiaraiHitiLrrlinilwiBiii 



'i<S;;<t9S.: 



%^^ :^ ^•u?>. 



94 



VOCABULARY. 



TOCABULARY. 



95 



Seem, /^ok/w, ebiKa. 
Seer, fiavrt^. 
Send, TTc'/iTTO). 
Semling'-away, airoa-roXr}. 
Sen:?t*less, a<f)ituiv. 
Sen>ible (to he)^ ^poviu). 
SeiMirato {^'h.^, ha(ma<»>. 

— ( prpp.), fiixa, X(Mipii. 
Serve, xmrnHxioi. 

Set (doicn)y Ka0i(<t>. 

— {brforo)^ irapnTi&qpLi. 

(M/>), l(TTT)pif opBodi. 

Sever, fipyw. 
Shade, aKia. 
Shady, KaranrKing. 
Shako (frans.), crdfo, 

— {tieitt.^^ TraXAofiai. 
Slianie, atSca;. 

— (i'6.), ai(T)(yv(o. 
Shape, (T\ripay p6p<^r). 
Shapeless, tipoptfyot. 
Share, ptrfipi. 

— {st<b.) poipUy (Tvpp(Tiax<>i' 
Shed, e/cj^fo). 

Sheep (pi.), pt)\a. 
Shew, 8tj\6(Oj (Kb(iKwpi. 

— («pm/.), npiwoi^ (f>aiv(t}y 
7rpo(f)aiu(o^ ^fiKWio, 

Shiue, <^X<'y«, (fyalvopat^ npt' 
TTW, ^(i/iTTca, eVXri^TTo). 

Ship, (rKd(f>oi, vavsy and see 
Iiuhw. 

Shoot, JcXaSof. 

Shore, aicn)^ x(p(roi. 

Shrill, Xtyi'poff. 

Shroud, TTfpMrTfXXo). 

Shudder, (fyplaao), 

Shui. kXcIo). 

Sick (to be)y voa(a>. 

Side, TrXfvpd. 

Sigrhl (oryan of)y opfuif 

— (ohject of), oylris, 64a. 



Sijfht (tn X,), ev oppaa-iy cV 

d(f)3a\pois. 
Sign, (rvuSrjpxi. 
Silence, (riyr). 
Silver, apyvpovs. 
Simple, fvrjdrjs^ dnXovs. 
Since, (V, (^ ov. 
Sin^ over, ((ftvpvtb). 
Single, tiTrXoi's'. 
Sister, dB(\(f)f}f Kumr. 
Sit, ^paty K(i$Tjpaiy $d(r(T<a. 
Sk}', alBffp. 
>' ive (vb.), hovXfVQ). 

— (subs.), 5oi)Xoff. 
Sleep, (ca^ft'So). 
Slightly, 3«tti. 
Slip, (T<pu\pa. 
Smite, €KTrXrj(r(T(o. 
So, wo-avTcos. 

Sober (to be), <T(o(f)pov((o. 
Soft, ptiXOaKOi. 
Solemn, aspvof. 
Sometimes, (o-B* ore. 
Song, doidrf, (o8t). 
Soothe, KT)\((o. 
Soulless, nylrvxot. 
Soimd, (ioT), KTimoSf (fxaini. 

Sow, orTTftpO). 

Spade, ^iKfXXa. 
Spare, <f)€l8op(u. 
Spark, arna'Brjp, 
Spectaele, Oiapa. 
Speech, pi'dus. 
Spill, eV;^^«a). 
Spirits, (fipfvfs. 
Spite, vfipis. 
Split, ^taax^C^^. 
Spoil, i7(p6<o. 
Sport, nai((o. 
Spread, pTjKvvto. 
Stain, ;^prui/a). 

— (wvV/i Uood) aiparoa. 
Stand, la-rapaLy KaOia-rapai, 



Starless, avaoTpos* 
Stately, atpvog. 
Stem, deivoi^. 

Sting, K€VT(<0. 

Stool, fSpa. 

Stop, TTllVia. 

Storm, xf'V<»»'i 'rT(p(j)i(. 
Stormy, dva-xdpfpo^. 
Strange, Oavpiiy davpa(Tr6s. 
Stranger, ^(vos. 
Stream, vdpa, po^, ptWpov. 
Strength, aOivo^, Icrx^^' 
Strife, crratrtf. 

Strong, KpaTfpoi or Kapr^pos. 
— (to be)y a-Btvfu. 
Succession, hiahoxi)- 
Such, Toioo-^e, ToioOroff. 
Sucking, yaXa.Br)voi. 
Sudden, dnpoa-^oKrfns. 
Sufl'er, Tratr^w. 
Suflf'ering, irdBo^. 
Sutricient, avTapKi]^. 
Sullen, (TKv0p(tyTr6s. 
Sunmier, Bepos. 
Summit, Kopvcfyrj. 

Sup, teiTTVCO}. 

Superfluowis, Trfpicra-ds. 
Supplicate, Xtirapcu). 
Sup])lication, Xirr). 
Sui'pa^s, vTrcpiidXXd). 
Surround, dpTrltrxfi, dp(f)i- 

fidXXo). 
Suspicion, v-na-^ia. 
Swain, (paarris. 
Swan, KvKvoi. 
Swear, opwpi. 
Sweet, yXvKVi. 
Sword, ^t</)«'?. 



Tablet, ^fXror. 
Take, Xnp^dvoi. 

— (back)y dvaXap^dvopai, 



Take (in hunting), dypeva. 
Tame, ^updo). 
Tear, 8dKpv. 

— (i}b.) (mcay), oTroo-Traw. 

— (up), aj/ao-Trdo). 
Teem, (ipxxji. 

Tell, 0/)fj^6), ai'Sdci), e^avSdo). 
Temperate, aoitPpoiv. 
Tempest, BviKXa. 
Temple, recuy, Tfpcvos. 
Tenantless, dvoiicqros. 
Tender, dtzaXos* 
Thanks, x^P*^* 
That, a)s, on, ovvfKa, oBov- 

P€Ka. 
There, cVd, ivravBa. 
Think, uopl^iOy fio^eo), voeco. 
Though, TTfp, KatTrep (only 

ith participles), 
Xhougllt, evBvprjpa. 
Thread, KpoKrj. 
Throb, ndXXopai. 
Thrust (au'ny), diroiBioa. 
I'hmiderer, Kepavvtos. 
Th under-stricken, ip^pdvri]- 

TOS. 

Tide, TTdXippoia, TrXrjppvpis. 
Till (vb.), dp6(o. 

— {conj.^, €(rT€. 

Time, ;^poVo$', Kaipus (of a 

jmrticiilar time). 
Timely, apdios. 
Title, Tipf). 
Together, opov, 
ToU, aBXos. 
Tomb, Tvp^os. 
Torch, Xvxvos. 

Touchj^iyydVo), TrpnaBiyydvoi, 
Touchstone, ^da-avng. 
Tower-wise, Trvpyrjdop, 
Tmck, (TTi^os. 

— (vb.)y ixv€vco. 
Tremble, rpepa. 



■is 









'/•kvjrti **-* 



96 



TOCABULART. 



Trial, neipa. 
Trip. rrf/>aXXofia(. 
Trouble, ro/jMrrcro). 

TrU8t, TTtOTCVO). 

Trustwortliy, niaros. 
Turn. (TTp((f>a>. 
TurniiiL'-back {mb8.)f otto- 

orTpo</>i). 
Twice, ^li. 
Two, 81^0, biaaoi. 



Unanimous, av^<l)<»>vos. 
Unaware, \a0pa. 
Unbtn*n, aytvvrjTo^. 
Uncertain, ooTjfxos. 
Understand, fxav0dv(o. 
Underntandinir, triTf o-ty. 
ITndistinjruishahlfs uKpiros. 
Unerring", vrj^fprrfi:. 
Unexpected, ajrpocT^oicTjTos. 
Unfold, StaTTTi'tro-o). 
Unfrequented, (prffios. 
Uninjured, n.iiXa^^r. 
Unknown, dyv<tis. 
Unloose, ai'aXi^o). 
Unhnnir, dyfrfvh'ji. 
Unnoticed, li-njfxfKrjTos. 
Unrestrained, ov Karaaxcrds. 
T'nshepherded, dnoi^airros. 
Inskilled, dnupos. 
Unsul)stantial, il^fvrfvoi. 
I'nteuded, diinvKoXrjTos. 
Untourhed, dBiKTo^. 
Untrodden, doTfiirros. 
T'nwilling, «*ca)v, ov^ ftcotv, 

UpliftiUfT («/Vw.), VTTTllKTfia. 

T^rjre, f(f)opfid(o. 
Uf»e, xpdop.ai. 
— {glth.), Xpf'ici. 
I'tinost, e'cr;((i'r«y. 
I'tter, drf>irjpi, (^uvbdo). 

Utterance, (^Oiyiia, 



Vain, Ktvoi. 

— {in I'.) pdrqv. 

Valiant, ^aXfptiff, (TXici/iof. 

Valley, mrn;, firjcraa, 

Vanii»h, (pBli'O). 

A'^apour, drfxus. 

Varied, TroutXor. 

A'ary, ^ia<f>(p(i>, 

V{i8sal, v7rT]Knos. 

Venerable, <T€fivas. 

— (y<?/;i,), TTOTvia. 

Vine, dpniXos. 

A'iolentlv, fila. 

\'ir»rin, ndpOsvoi. 

Vision, o'^is. 

Vocation, ^ios. 

Voice, (fxovT)^ (fyOoyyrjy dp(^r). 

Void, \dn^. 

Voya<^e, rrXoOf. 



Walk, (jrelxo}. 

— {nhouf)f hifpnoi. 

Wander, TrXn^o/xat, tiKavdo' 

yMi^ d\dop,ai. 
Want, 8*0). 
War, *A/>t;9, TToXf^off. 
Wanntb, ^uXttoc. 
. Warn, irnpaiviu), (f>p€i'oco. 
Wash, Xoi'o). 
Wasp, (7-<^^f. 
Waste, tpTjpla. 

Watch, Tiip€<t>. 
Wa\er {fh.)y dp8a>, 
' Wave, jci'^a, Kkvbtou. 
Wax irb.)j av^op^u ptyas. 
Weak, d<T0fvi)f, da-dei^iov. 
Weakly, paXOaKuts. 
Wear, (f)op€ai. 
Weary, irapapfvoi. 
Weave, vrpaivaiy rrXticfii). 
Web, iOTTOf. 



VOCABULARY. 



97 



Wedlock, ydpoi. 
A\ eep, dhvpopm. 
Weigh-down, ^apvvcj. 
Weight, dxBoi. 
Well, ,l,p. 
Wheel, rpoxdi. 

When, OTf, fVTfy (TTfly rjVLKa, 

dTnjviKa, 

When-fore, dvd' Ijv, npos 

raCra. 
Wherever, onovn-ep. 
White, Xev/coy, TTa'XXfVKOf . 
^^'^yy Toy x^piv; W; ri 

dijra ; ri hrproTt ; 
Wife, yvw), dnpap. 
Wild, nypin^. 

— ;/"^y)? dypiios. 
y\ ill, 8ov\€vcd, 
\\ in, KpaT(o>, 

Wind, (ivepofy nvoTjy nvtvpa. 
Wing, TTTepov. 
Winged, m-fpoet?. 
Wish, ^ovXopai, BeXa, 



Wither, ai5atVa>. 
AVithin, (u8ov. 
Woe, nddos. 
AN'onder, daipa, Bdp^os. 
Wont {to be), (^iXfo). 
Word, prjfjM, frros. 
Worse, x^^p<^Vy Kcucmv. 
Worship, TrpotTKvveu. 
Would that, (Wf {opt), 

or with a><f)cXov. 
Wound, Tpavpcni(a>. 

— (*wi.), Tpavp,a. 
Wrestle, naXalto. 
Wretched, <WXio^. 
Wrought, (ifipyaapfvos. 

Yesterday, ;^^cV. 
Yet, Tro). 

— {coii)\), Kniroi. 
loke, a-vyKara^evyuvui. 
Youth, Tprj. 

— (7/. ?iin7i), veaviaf. 



DtPAR?YE?jT. \ ^ 
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98 



EXERCI>ES IX THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK lAilBlC VERSE. 



99 



PART II. 

Exercise 1 (a), 

Worcester. Peace, cousin, say no more ! 
And now I will unclasp a secret hook, 
And to your quick-conceiving discontents 
I'll read you matter deep and dangerous, 
As full of peril and adventurous spirit 
As to o'erwalk a cun-ent roaring loud 
On the unsteadfast footing of a spear. 

Hotspur, If he fall in, good night ! or sink or swim : 
Send danger from the east unto the west, 
So honour cross it from the north to south. 
And let them grapple : the blood more stii-a 
To rouse a lion than to start a hare 1 

Hints. 

' Peace, cousin ' ttc. — will you not be silent and 
not <kc. . . . See Soph. Aj. 75. 

* Quick-conceiving discontents' — to you anticipat- 
ing to leani in bitter wrath. 

* To over walk ' ttc. — if you were to go ye<l>vpw(Ta^ 
a torrent, TrofSfxiviov your unstoiuly foot tkc. 

* If he fall ' (fee. — Vrw the faller, for 'tis a crisis to 
swim or die. 

* Send danger ' kc. — let whatever is ^vrrxtfiov come 
vTratrrpoVf against honour meeting it right-opposite. 

* The blood stii*s,* artnTofirjv. 



Exercise 1 (b). 

yorihumherlaml. Imagination of some grciit exploit 
Drives him Ijeytjnd the bounds of patience. 

E, By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap 

To pluck bright honour from the pale-f^iced moon, 

Or dive into the lx)ttom of the deep. 

Where futhom-line could never touch the gi-oimd, 

And pluck up drowned houom- by the locks; 

So he that doth redeem her thence might wear 

Without corrival all her dignities : 

But out upon this half-faced fellowship ] 

Shalcsjyeare. ' 

* Imagination ' itc— Tlie man seems to be inspired 
<kc. and not truxpfwyur, 

* Methinks' iirc.-I think that leaping I could 
easily snatch &c. 

' Bright— i)ale-fiu;ed,' xP^<Tut\l,^apyvpil,'^, 

* WTiere fathom-line ' (fcc— where araOfXTj ^,) .iXtru 
(for this fit) see Soph. Aj. 659). 

* So that ' cl'c— £>>' ^ (with infin.). 

* Out upon ' — ippiTU) this *fec. 



Exercise 2. 
Needs must 1 like it well : I weep for joy 
To stand upon my kingdom once again. 
Bear eju-th, I do salute thee with my hand, 
Though rebels wound thee with their horses' hoofs : 
As a long-pai-ted mother with her child 
Plays fondly with her teai-s iind smiles in meeting, 
So, weeping, smiling, gieet I thee, my earth, 

B 2 



rBi*ibte/*.-d»iSgaari3>««iateT-i!^ jyj'jia»:^ ■^tjiaatiiM 



100 



EXERCISES IN THE COMTOSITION OP 



And do thee favour with my royal hands. 
Feed not thy sovereign's foe, my genUo eju-th, 
Nor with thy sweets comfoi-t hLs ravenous sense ; 
But let thy spidei-s, that suck up thy venom, 
And heavy-gaited toads lie in their way, 
Doing annovance to the ti-eacherous feet 
Which with usurping steps do trample thee. 

Shakspeare. 

'Needs must* kc — how do I not rejoice and 
weep «fec. 

* As a long-parte<l mother ' *fec. — as some mother 
•)^ovia in converse with her child (gen.) laughs with 
Hood of tears. 

* Feed not * kc. — (make two lines of this, the first 
entreating gentle eai-th, the second conveying the sub- 
ject of entreaty). 

* Ravenous ' — /iopyuii'. 

* Heavy-gaited toads * &c. — heavy toads with cuer^o- 
poi (TvfiftoXai injiu^ the feet of tiuitoi-s &c. 

* Trample ' — Xa^ irartly. 



Exercise 3 (a). 

Afarmachcke. Time, since man first drew breath, has 
never moved 

With such a weight upon his wings as now ; 

But they will soon be lightened. 
Oswald. Ay, look up — 

Cast round you your mind's eye, and you will learn 

Fortitude is the child of Entei-pris© : 

Great iictions move our admiration, chiefly 



'■'r^ 






.:.'ii 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



101 



Beciiuse they CfviTy in themselves an earnest 
That we can suffer greatly. 

-" • Veiy ti*ue. 

0. Action is transitoiy — a step, a blow, 

The motion of a muscle — this way or that, 
*Tis done, and in the after vacancy 
We wonder at om^lves like men betrayed : 
Suffering is peimanent, obscure and dai-k, 
And shai-es the nature of infinity. 

* But they mil soon ' &c.-— and yet he will quickly 
lighten them (divide the lines to speakei-s just as in 
English). 

* Foi-titude — experience ' — ai^hpia — 7r£tpa. 

* Because they carry' *fec.— since they eOijKav hi- 
Xvpov of a mind equal (oloc) to bear nobly. 

* Action ' — ro TToielv. 

* This way or that ' — inclining as it might chance. 

* Suffering * — to B' av TraBelv. 

* Infinity ' — uirupoq fvari^. 



Exercise 3 (6). 
M. Truth : and I feel it. 

^' What ! if you had bid 

Eteniid fai-ewell to unmingled joy 

And the light dancing of the thoughtless heai-t ; 

It is the toy of fools, juid little fit 

For such a world as this. The wise abjure 

All thoughts whose idle composition lives 

In the entire forgetfulness of pain. 

— I see I have distmbed you. 
^' By no means. 



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W^-'F7?>s^J^^' 



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102 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



103 



0, Compassion ! pity ! pride can do without them ; 
And what if you should never know them more ! — 
He is a puny soul who, feeling pain, 
Finds ease because another feels it too. 

Wordstoorth. 

* Bid eternal farewell * — iroWh xa'pf**' Xcy^**'- 

* Toy * — aSup^ara. 

^ AVliose idle composition ' etc. — which l)eing empty 
(TvvifTTaffav unmindful of mortal ^nef. 

*I see* &c. — K-ai fxifv I have evidently etc. 

* Compassion * «$:c.— one desti-oys (aor.) then pity, 
and yet is self-sufficient and lofty minded, and thee I 
place among these. 

'Who, feeUng pain* *kc. — for whom Trovovyrt 
another shai-ing the weight of grief lightens it. 



EXEKCISE 4 (a). 
Polpiices. Say on, dear mother, say what so you 
please, 

What pleaseth you shall never me disease. 
locasta. And seems it not a heavy hap, my sonnc, 

To l)e deprived of thy country coastesi 
P, So heavy hap as tongue cjinnot expresse. 
/. And what may moste molest the mind of man 

That is exiled fi*om his native soilel 
P. Wliy, that he lacketh freedom for to speake 

What seemeth best, without control! or checke. 
/. Why so, eche servant lacketh lil^ertie 

To s^ieake his minde without his mastei-*s leave. 
P, In exile every man, or bond or free, 

Of noble i-ace or meaner parentage, 



Is not in this imlike unto the slave 

That must of force obey to each man's will 

And prayse the peevishness of each man's pride. 

* To be deprived '—Kvpely with perf. part. 

' So heavy hap ' <fec.— greater in deed than in word. 
'Why, that he lacketh' tfec— ro /x;) CuyatrOai to 
speak <fec. . . . vuppijaii^. 

* Why so ' — wliat is that so great ? 

' That must of force ' &c. — and dependent upon 
the will Tov TV)(6i'roQj pmises pei-force <kc. 



Exercise 4 (b). 

/. And seemeth tliis so greevous unto thee 1 
P. What greefe can greater be, than so constrained 
Slavelike to serve gainst right and reason lx)th ? 
Yea much the more to him that noble is 
By stately line, or yet by vertuous life 
And hath a heart Hke to his noble minde. 
/. What helpeth most in such adversitie ? 
P. Hope helpeth most to comfort miserie. 
/. Hope to return from whence he first was driven ? 
P. Yea, hope that hapneth oftentimes too late, 
And many dye before such hap may fall. 

Ga8coig7ie» 
*By stately line' <fec.— fi-om good fathers, or lead- 
ing a fair life, nourishes heai-t worthy of his no- 
bility. 

* Hope helpeth ' (kc—is the best ally to him who 
toils. 



iilja^fefei&iaai^Btii^.sa»'ji^'^^SaJa5tei^iE^a^ i^y, -.-^.-a-^y^^^Aa ';agfe"»frjaafe^.foj£^-:Agk^^'"'^" " '^-'"'^ 



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104 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



105 



ExEucisE 5 (a). 

When gi*edy liust in royall seate to reigne 
Hath reft all caie of goddes and eke of men, 
And cruell hart, wmth, treason, and disdaine 
Within anibicious brest are lodged ; then 
Beholde how mischiefe wide her selfe displays 
And with the brother's hand the bi*other slayes. 

When blond thus shed doth staine the heavens 
face 
Ci-ying to Jove for vengeance of the deede, 
The mightie God even moveth from his place 
With wi-ath to wreke, then sendes He foi-th with 

spede 
The dreadfull furies, daughtei*8 of the night, 
With serpentes girt, carrying the whip of ire, 
With heare of stinging snakes, and shining bright 
With flames and bloud, and with a brand of fire. 

* Hath reft* &€. — makes no accoimt of Ac. 

* And cruell ' &c. — and ambition dwells in all, full 
of env}^ &c. 

* With brother's hand * — avra^A^otc xepatv. 

* When bloud ' &c. — (make thi-ee lines of these two). 

* The mightie God * &c. — rising from his holy 
throne, sends the Erinyes itc. . . . shining brightly 
with al^aTopfjvTOQ flame, girt as to hair and zone with 
snakes and armed with avenging lash (accus.) fiery 
sword in hands. 



Exercise 5 (6). 

Tliese for revenge of wretched murder done 
Do make the mother kill her onely sonne. 



Bloud asketh bloud, and death must death re- 
quite ; 
Jove by his just and everlasting dome 
Justly hath ever so requited it ; 
This times before recoi-de, and times to come 
Shall finde it ti'ue, and so dooth prasent proofe 
Present before our eies for our behoofe. 

happie wight that sufii*es not the snare 
Of murderous minde to tangle him in blood, 
And happy he that can in time beware 
By others liarmes and tui-ne it to his good. 

Sackville aiul yorion. 

'Revenge of miuder ' — u^oifii) aifinruv. 

* Jove by his just ' &c. — (put these five lines into 
four). Z. by nnmovejible law tdiro these airoipa &c. . . . 
^c. . . ., and pres<^nt pi-oof shows it plainly, a irapai- 
viaiq to us from above. 

*0 happy wight' cfec— (put these four lines into 
five). If a mind of cnifty counsel does not lead astray 
(aor.) persuading, nor tangle {(pvpa^a) <fec. I congra- 
tulate [him], Jind whoever &c. — (TKoirovfieyog others* 
misfortunes learns without suffering to auK^povtiv, 



Exercise 6. 

As when Earth's son Antajus, to compare 
Small things with greatest, in Irassa strove 
With Jove's Alcides, and oft foil'd still rose. 
Receiving from hLs mother earth new strength, 
Fresh from his fall, and fiercer grapple joined, 
Throttled at length in th' air, expired and fell; 



VA^A 









i •■ 




106 



EXERCISES IN TITE COMPOSITION OP 






So after many a foil the temptor proud, 
Rene\\'ing fresh assaults, amidst his pride 
Fell whence he stood to see his victor fall. 
And as tliat Thel)an monster that proposed 
Her riddle, and him who solved it not, devoured, 
That once found out and solv'd, for grief and spite 
Cast herself headlong from th' Ismenian steep ; 
So struck with dread and anguish fell the fiend. 

M'dton. 

(Make four lines of the first three.) 'Strove* 
— came to hands (followed by dative). 

* Fresh from his fall* <fec.— (make three lines of 
these two). 

'Throttled in th' air' — /itrapffioc — ir ayx«»'«*C- 
*So after' tkc. — (make four lines and a half of 
these three). Conquered by countless wrestlings, 6 
Ivff^itviiQ etc. ... (see Eur. Hel. 387) fell oBiv irip <fec. 

* The Thebm monster' (see Soph. 0. R. 391). 

* Him who solv'd it not ' — ritv ^t) ffathrjiutravrn, 
(Eighteen Greek lines in all.) 



Exercise 7. 

For such end 
The gods give none they love not ; but my heart, 
That leaps up lightened of all sloth or fear 
To take the sword's point, yet with one thought's 

load 
Flags, and falls back, broken of wing, that halts 
Maimed in mid flight for thy sake and borne down, 
Mother, that in the places where I plaved 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



107 



An arm's length from thy lx)som and no more 
Shalt find me never, nor thine eye wax glad 
To mix with mine its eyesight and for love 
Laugh without word, filled with sweet light, and 

speak 
Divine dumb things of the inward spirit and heart, 
Moved silently ; nor hand or lip agjiin 
Touch hand or lip of either, but foi* mine 
Shall thine meet only shadows of swift night. 

Swi'iibuy'ne, 

* But my heart * <kc. — (accusative, to be governed 
by ' one thought deadens ' at end of fifth line) ' freed 
from sloth and fear, leaping willingly upon sharpened 
point of sword ' etc. 

* Flags and falls bjick ' &c, . . . fallen, in mid flight 
with broken wings (gen. abs.) for thee, mother. 

' That in the places ' <fec. — because you will never 
find your maiden where <fec. . . . not unguai'ded by 
your ai-m (see Pi'eliminai'y Remarks, Syntax 5). 

'To mix with mine' — uniting common jjoXai. 

* And s[)eak divine ' &c. — nor will you again utter, 
in silent addresses, something divine out of inmost 
he}u*t. 

(Eighteen Greek lines in all.) 



Exercise 8. 

Deal' Ls the memory of oiu* wedded lives, 

And dear the last embi'aces of oui* wives 

And their warm tears : but all hath suffered change ; 

For surely now our household hearths are cold : 



.. -'I 



>->*« 



-'•i.strji '' 



108 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

Our sons inherit us : our looks are strange : 

And we should come like ghosU to trouble joy. 

Or else the island-priuces over-bold 

Have eat our subst^mce, jmd the minstrel sings 

Before them of the ten-yeju-s' war in Troy, 

And our gre^t deeds, as half-foi-gotten things. 

Is there confusion in the little isle ] 

Let what Ls broken so remain, 

The gods are hard to reconcile : 

Tis hard to settle order once again. 

Tenni/8(y)i. 

(Make four lines of the fii-st three.) 

* And dear the last ' &c. ... the warm teai-s of 
wives ifec. ... in the very-last embraces. 

* All hath suffei-ed change ' — one line. 

* Oiu* sons ' <fec. — one line. 

*Our looks' <kc.— strangers in face we should 
come like fafffiara of shadows that will disturb 
(partic.) joy. 

* Or else * <fec. — (make four lines of these three). 

* And the minstrel ' tfec— to whom minstrels sing 
the fortunes of Ilium and war filling-up the tenth 
year &c. 

*Is there confusion' ^fec— or else dissension holds 
the isle : I bid long fju-ewell to broken strength. 
'Hard to reconcile' — ivoTrapahr^TOQ, 
(Seventeen Gi-eek lines in all.) 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE, 



Exercise 9. 



109 



Place me once more, my daughter, where the sun 

May shine upon my old and time-worn head, 

For the last time, perchance. My race is run ; 

And soon amidst the ever-silent dead 

I must repose, it may be, half-forgot. 

Yes ! I have broke the hard and bitter bread 

Foi' many a year, with tho.se w^ho trembled not 

To buckle on their armour for the fight, 

And set themselves against the tyrant's lot, 

And I have never bowed me to liis might, 

Nor knelt befoi'e him — for I bear within 

My heai-t the sternest consciousness of right, 

And that perpetual hate of gilded sin 

Which made me what I am. 

Aytoun. 

* May shine ' — ^wc iirififmiyiit\ 

* For the hist time * — (see Soph. Aj. 858). 

* My race is run * — one line. 

* And soon &c. . . . and I must among the voiceless 
and dead sleep profitless, and, if it chance, nameless.' 

* Yes ! I have broke ' (fee. . . . For already it is a 
long time i^ otov <kc. 

* Set themselves against* — avTionTaTtiy. 

*And I have never* <kc. — (make seven of these 
five lines). 

* Bowed myself' (see Eur. Pho&n. 293). 

* For I bear ' itc. — ^for I, if any one, nvyoLCa Tpi(p<ov 
within my heju^ itc. . . . <fec. . . . such hatred of 
-yjpvaoTratTTo^ lawlessness EvreTijKe /loi &c, 

(Eighteen Greek lines in all.) 






fe-;i 






110 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

Exercise 10. 

I coine not here, you gods, to plead the right 
By which anti(juity assigned my deity, 
Thougli no particiiljir station 'mongst the stars, 
Yet genei-al power to rule their influence; 
Or Ijoast the title of omnipotent 

Ascribed me then, by which I rival'd Jove 

Since you have cancelled jdl those old recoi-ds • 

But confident in my good cause and merit 

Claim a succession to the vacant orb; 

For since Astra^a fled to heaven, I sit 

Her deputy upon earth ; I hold her sl.i. ., 

And weigh men's fates out, who have made me blind 

Because themselves want eyes to see my causes ; 

Call me inconstant, 'cause my works surpa^is 

The shallow fathom of their human reason : 

Yet hei-e, like blinded Justice, I dispense 

With theii* iniiwiriial hands their constant lots, 

And if desertless impious men engi*oss 

My best rewai-ds, the fault is yours, ye gods, 

That scant your graces to moi-t^ility. 

Carew. 

(Contract the first seven lines into six.) ' O goda, 
I do not at all bring forward my gloiy as of a god 
though wielding an uncertain power of old fiom the 
stars, but not having place among them — nor do I 
claim ' &c. 

'But confident' itc. (transpose these two lines), 
* I come, as not worthy to obtain * &c, 

* For since ' «fec. (make five lines of these four) ; 

* hold her scales' — raXarTovxo^, 






If 






GKEEK IAMBIC TERSE. 



Ill 



* Call me inconstant ' &c. — (make eight lines of 
the next seven). ' But they, ignorant that I surpass 
Ac. . . . call me ' {aTroKaXely, used for calling a bad 
name) &c. 

* Engross my best rewards' — treat unworthily 
what 1 have given. 

* That scant ' <fec. — beciiuse you neglect them being 
so dishonoured. (Use oIoq for ori toiovtoc). 



Exercise 11 (a). 

Thus low my duty 
Answers your lordship's counsel. I will use, 
In the few words with which I am to trouble 
Your lordship's OJirs, the temper that you wish me ; 
Not that I fear to speak my thoughts as loud, 
And with a liberty beyond Romont ; 
But that I know, for me, that am made up 
Of all that's wretched, so to haste my end 
Would seem to most i-ather a willingness 
To quit the buithen of a hopeless life, 
Than scorn of death, or duty to the dead. 

* Thus low <fec. . . . wish me.' (Four lines.) ' Thou 
advisest well, and falling here, I will answer shortly, 
although it will be said a' ox^ov to you, I will use the 
temper' &c. 

* With a liberty ' <fec. . . . Tripa 'Put^ovrtov. 

* Of jdl that's wretched ' — of misfortunes as many 
as there are. 



■fii^W. 






P,yp(^mf^^^^^^ict^^y-l'^-^^^, 



112 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

'So to haste' <fec. . . . seeming to many thus to 
have anticipated my destined end, mther readOy to 
end the hopeless h'te tlmn to scorn (Oapaur) fate, and 
pay what is owed to those below. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



113 



Exercise 11 (h). 

I therefore bring the tribute of my pniise 
To youi- seventy, and commend the justice 
That will not, for the many services 
That any man hath done the commonwealth 
Wink at his least of ills. UT,at tJiough my Vather 
Writ man l^efore he was so, and confirmed it 
By numbering that day no part of his life 
In which he did not sei-vice to his country ; 
Was he to be free, therefo^^ from the laws' 
And ceremonioiLs forms in your deci-ees ! 

, «.!.^ '■^«'*fo«* • Ac. ... to ' least of ills • (four lines). 

Wherefore measuring the season of praise to you 

who ai-e harsh, I reverence the aecu.-acy of one who 

fears in return for &c to p.etenU even if ho 

Sin the least. 

' Writ man '— £;c ^rhpac TeXeh. 

*Was he to be free' <kc On account then of 

these laws which we hold {ro^ii:^,) and decree, ought 
he to be freed t ^ 



Exercise 12. 

HjuI it pleased Heaven 
To tiy me with affliction ; had he luined 
All kin<ls of sores, an«l shames, on my bare head ; 
Steeped uic in poverty to the very lips ; 
Given to ciiptivitv me and my utmost hopes ; 
I should have found iu some place of my soul 
A di-op of patience : but, alas I to make me 
The fixe<l tiL»ui*e of the timo, for Scorn 
To point his slow and moviiiiif linger at ! 
Yet could I Ix^'ir that too ; well, very well : 
But there, where I have garner'd up my heart ; 
Where either I must live, or bear no life ; 
The founbiiu from the which mv current runs. 
Or else dries up : to be discanled thence ! 
Turn thy complexion there, 
Patience, thou young and rose-h'pped cherubim ! 
Ay, there, look grim as hell ! — Shakspeare. 

* Steoi>ed me in poverty ' — flooded me wholly with 
l)Overty'8 wave. 

* 3Ie antl my utmost hopes ' — me, with the very 
uf}fntt (omitting pivposition) of saving hope, 

* But, alas ! to make me ' &c. — but, lo ! how I 
stand like some wretched image and am pointed at 
<fcc. . . . of scornful time creeping on. 

* Whei-e I had garner'd ' — where was the KeifiiiXwy 
of my heart. 

*To be discaixled' &c. — -6 j.* tkiretrrtv A-c. . . . 
will patience not change (t-<ny)Ou'/jw) the bloom of her 
cheek, and take-in-exchangc the grim form of Hades ! 



' •'..• 



.j"»-Miii"\ 









aiIt-?Vl..'.::"^ -.* >?3^. • 



JiL*J 






^?^nT*^^^^^^^^^ 



' .■^i?e3p»^p^«Kpsp!|^ 



ii»-t^:T^ 



S'!f'lii83 



114 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

Exercise 13 (a). 

1 know you all, and ^^^ll a while uphold 

The unyoked humour of your idleness ; 

Yet herein will I imitate the sun, 

A\Tio doth i)ermit the base contagious clouds 

To smother up his beauty from the world, 

That when he please again to be himself, 

Being wanted, he may be more wonder'd at, 

By breaking through the foul and ugly mists 

Of vapours that did seem to stmnglo him. 

If all the year were playing holidays, 

To 8i)ort would l>e jvs tedious as to work ; 

But when they seldom come, they wish'd-for oome. 

And nothing pleaseth but rare accidents. 

* The unyoked humours * — opyat nkofr^oi. 

* Who doth pei-mit ' tfcc.— who before men's eyes 
allows the roffwceq nUxnr of watery cloud to hide itc. 

* When he please * tl-c— whenever he change his 

former circle. 

* By breaking ' Arc— if he shall burst through the 

l)reath of &c. 

* Wt're plaving holidays * — wished foprn^ttv. 

* ^\'^\en thev seldom come * — the mro presence of 

festivals. 

*Rare accidents' — rn /loXic Ivm^avrn. 



Exercise 13 (ft). 

Bo when this loose behaWour I throw off, 

And pay the debt I never pi-omis^d, 

By how much better than my word I am 



greek IAMBIC verse. 



115 



By so much shall T falsify men's hopes ; 
And like ]>right metal on a sidlen gi*ound, 
My reformation, glittering o'er my fault, 
Shall show more goodly and attract more eyes 
Than that which hath no foil to set it off. 
I'll so offend to make offence a skill ; 
Redeeming time when men think least I will. 

* Better than my word' — better y kutU what I ])ro- 
mised. 

Shall show more goodly ' Ax.— shall show some- 
thing K'tCfov and jrtpii^XeiTTvt' such iis by itself has no 
beauty. 

' I'll so offend ' ttc. — thus sinning, I sin cleverly. 

* Kedeemiiig time ' etc.— unexpectedly finding uyTi- 
TTui ^ a of time. 



0/ 



Exercise 14. 

But who is this ? what thing of sea or land 1 
Female of sex it seems — 
Tl»at so bedecked, ornate, and gay, 
< this way Siiiling, like a sfcitely ship 

Of Tarsus, bound for the isles 
Of Javan or Gadii-e, 

With all her bravery on, and tackle trim, 
Sails filled, and sti-eamei-s waving, 
Coui-ted by all the winds that hold them play. 
An aml)er scent of odorous peifume 
Her harbinger, a damsel train behind. 
Some rich Philistian matron she may seem ; — 
And now at nearer view, no other cei-tain 

1 2 



•.'I '««' 



'&!MSi:mS'SiSmMM^e0!B'SSMMiiSSXi:Li 






■asf* 



116 EXERCISES IN THE COm^OSlTION OF 

Tlian Dalilii thy wife. 
Santsou. :\ry wife ! my tiaiti-ess ! let her not come 

near mo I 
Cho. Yet on she moves, now stands and eyes thee 

fixed. 
About to have spoke ; bni now, with liead de- 
clined, 
Like a fair Hower surchargetl witli dew, she weeps. 
And words addi*essed seem into tears dissolved, 
Wettin.ir the borders of her silken veil. 
But now again she make,^ addi-ess to sj>eak. 

Milton, 

*That so bedecked' A'C— for adonied- with 
varied robes it sails (ravtrroKn) liither, as some oXKuy 
et|uipped for the liappy isle &c. . . . entii^ly 
furnished with beautiful tackle. 

*An amber scent' itc— for sweet-smelling bmith 
of i>erfume, and following (see Eur. Hipp. 1179) band 
of virgins attendij her. 

* And now at nejii-er * &v.—l slmll say, on behold- 
ing, ('tis) thy wife and no other. 

* My traiti-ess ! '— insei-t filr ovi\ 

*Eves thee fixed '—Ux)king on thee with dii-ect 

(dpHoc) eyes. 

'And words addres.sed' JLc— clianging teara for 

her addresses. 



Exercise ir> (a). 

But 1 remember, 
Two miles on this side of tl»e fort, the road 
Crosses a deep nixine ; 'tis i-ough and narrow, 



) 



OTIEEK lAMlJiu VJ.K;5;l:. 



117 



Anil winds with short turns down the precipice ; 
And in its depth thei-e is a mighty rock, 
WJiich has, fi-om unimaginable yeai*s, 
Sustained itself with terror and with toil 
Over a gulf, and with the aj^onv 
^^ ith which it elings seems slowly coming down; 
Even as a wretched soul houi- after hour 
Clings to the mass of life ; yet clinging leans ; 
And, leaning, make>s more dark the drejid abyss 
In which it feai-s to fall. 

'i'ho fiist three and a half lines make five. 

* Two miles ' &c.— Expi^ss thus— before the road 
comas to the fort — now the onwaixi course is stretched 
for one hundred 7r\6«^>« (gen.)— etc. . . (Insert the 
latter claiuse parenthetically in the former.) 

' irnimaginal)le years '—the conntless iiight of time. 

* Li»4ins' — cyvX/i'frat. 



Exercise 15 (/>). 

Beneiith this cri\g 
Huge as despair, as if in weariness, 
The melancholy mountiiin yawns — below, 
Vou hem* but see not an impetuous ton-ent 
Kiiging among the caverns, and a bridge 
Crosses the chasm ; and high above there grow. 
With intersecting tnmks, from crag to crag, 
Cedai-s, and yews, and pines ; wjiose tangled hair 
Is matted in one solid roof of shade 
By the dark ivy's twine. At noonday here 
'Tis twilight, and at sunset blackest night 

S7i€lley. 






■r« 






M*.-..-jl 



*''Ls^'-"' 



118 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



* You bear but see not ' kc. — there come the 
roarings of a ton*ent, whence it is not [iHWvsible] to see. 

* Whose titngled bail* ' »i:c. (from hei-e to end five 
lines) ; whose head a black ivy garland enfolding hides 
with shadow of tendrils. Hei-e tlie midday Ught is 
uncei-tain as at eve, but at sunset night sprejids A'c. 



Exercise 16 {a). 

Should we be silent and not spejik, oui* raiment 
And state of bodies would bewmy what life 
We have led since thy exile. Think with thyself, 
How moi-e mifoi-tunate than all living women' 
Ai-e we come hitber : since that thy sight, which 

should 
Make our eyes flow with joy, heai-ts dance with 

comforts, 
Consti-ains thoTii wl^ , .md shake \Nith fe;ir and 

sciTOW ; 
Making the mother, wife, and child to .-.< < 
The son, the buslmnd, iuid the fatber tearing 
His country's bowels out. And to ixK>r we 
Thine enmity's most capital. 

* And not sjKvik ' — (see Introduction, Syntax .5). 

< Would bewTay ' etc. — show what-kind-of life we 
lejid (arrXur) since you ai-e-bivnished. 

* More unfoi-tunate ' &c. — most wretched of all as 
many as live. 

* Since that thy sight' ttc— (begin with i-elative 
clause) ; for [that] which ought to call forth the tear of 
joy ike. . . . (two lines) — thy rrponoxpi^y compels <kc. 

' Making the mother ' ttc— (i>ut the pau-s together). 



I 



GREEK IAMBIC VER.^E. 



119 



If mother shall see (verl» with the last) son, wife 
huslKind, and cbild his begetter tearing kc. (see -^sch. 
P, V. 1023). 

Exercise 16 (b). 

Tbou Iwirrest us 
Oiu- prayers to the gods, which is a comfoi-t 
That all but we enjoy : for how can we, 
Alas ! how can we for our country pmy, 
Whereto we are bound ; together with thy victory, 
Whereto we are bound 1 Aljick ! or we must lose 
The country, our deur nui-se; or else tliy j^ei-son, 
Om- comfort in the country. We must find 
An evident calamity, though we had 
Our wish, which side should win : for either thou 
Must, as a foreign recreant, be led 
With mamicles through our sti-eets, or else 
Triumphantly tre;ul on thy country's ruin. 

Shakspeare, 
' That all but we ' <kc. — which to the othei*s is a 
comfoiii in troubles. 

* WheitJto we ai-e bound.' — This i-ei>eated expi-es- 
sion should come in as one line, * we ai-e bound (Trpoa))- 
Kofiit) to one necessity of two, after we Ciinnot pray 
for oiu- country or thy victory.' 

*0m- comfort in the country ' (one line). — And yet 
you are the only joy rutv IkiI, 

* We must find ' tkc— For it is plain, even if vic- 
toi7 shoidd fall to us tcx^/^trott, we shall have bitter 
results. 

* For either thou ' «S:c.— make four lines of the i-est. 






-*--.T^;--i*-i;«i: 






I 



120 



EXEKCISES IN THE COMrOSITION OF 



Exercise 17 (a). 

Kitu/. I like liim not ; nor stands it safe with us 

To let his madness range. Therofoi-e, prepare you ; 
I youi' commission will fortliwith dispatch, 
And he to England sliall along with you : 
The terms of our estate may not endure 
Hazard so dangerous, as doth hourly grow, 
Out of his lunacies. 

GuilJemtern. We will ourselves provide : 

Most holy and religious fejir it is, 
To keep those many many bodies safe, 
That live and feed upon your majesty. 

' I like/— Eur. EL 622. 

* To let' ttc. — his madness Mng ininrnr is not safe. 

* The terms of our estate ' — ra^ui Trfmyfinra, 

*As doth hourly' iVc — wliich he, l^eing mad, in- 
ClX^ases daily. (Divide the lines as in English.) 

* That live ' »fec. — live and have nourishment in 
thee alone. 



Exercise 17 (b). 

Rosend'antz, The single and peculiar life is bound 
With all the strength and armour of the mind, 
To keep itself fiom 'noyance ; but much moi-e 
That sph'it, uj>on whose weal dei)end and rest 
The lives of many. The cetvie of majesty 
Dies not alone ; but, like a gulf, doth draw 
Wliat's neai- it with it : it is a massy wheel, 
Fix'd on the summit of the highest mount, 
To whose huge spokes t<»n thousand lesser things 



greek iambic verse. 



121 



Ai-e mortised and adjoined; wliich, when it falls, 
Each small annexment, i>etty consetjuence, 
Attends the boistt^rous ruin. Never alone 
Did the king sigh, Imt with a general groan. 
Kiiuj, Arm you, I pray you, to this speedy voyage ; 
For we will fetters put upon this fear, 
Wliich now goes too free-footed. Shahspeare. 

* The single and j^eculiar* etc. — (Invert first two 
and a half lines, putting * each one l)eing single ' at 
beginning of thii'd line.) 

Is bound ttc. , . o<^f.<Xtrj/c LaTt to ward off evil ttc. . . 

* Doth draw.' — Use gnomic aorist. 

* It is a massy ' kc. — as fixed upon a topmost 
mountiiiu some vast wheel, to which a m}Tiad crowd 
of tilings lesser is fastened (yo^<^i.u)) with ;^ioa/. 

' But with ' — /!// (thxL 



Exercise 18 («). 

K, Ihnry. I muse, my lord of Gloster is not come : 
'Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man, 
^^'^hate'el' occasion keeps him from us now. 

Q, Margaret. Can you not see ? or will you not observe 
The strangenei?« of his altered countenance 1 
With what a majesty he bears himself; 
How insolent of late he is become. 
How proud, peremptory, and imlike himself? 
We know the time since he was mild and afl'able; 
And, if we did but glance a far-off look, 
Immediately he was upon liis knee, 
That all the court admii-ed him for submission % 






^ 



i.-S,'-„«4|,*..'A 



EfStf-lii:Sl^iSl^^i€2ai 






122 



EXEKCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



But meet Liui now, aud, be it in the morn, 
When every one will give the time of ilay, 
He knits his brow, and shows an angiT eye, 
And passeth by with stiff unl)0 wed knee, 
Disdaining duty that to ns btdonffs. 

* I muse * itc.— Sopli. O. T. 289. 

* Whate'er occasion ' kc. — by rejison of whatever 
neeil he is now not present. 

* With what a majesty ' tiro. — with what kingly 
manners he iy^Ui, 

* jNlild and affable ' — tvTTfWffi'iyupoi. 

* In the morn ' — i^ twdivov. 

* When everyone * Jcc. — when there is no one who 
does not ])id hail. 

' Knits Ids brow ' etc. — see Eur. Ale. 780. 

* And passeth ' *l'c. — not kneeling, he passes me 
ofjOorTTi'ihiv without-a-share of honoiu due to me. 



Exercise 18 (6). 
Q. Margaret. Small cui-s ai-e not i-egarded when they 
gi-in ; 
But gi-eat men ti-emble when the lion roai-s : 
And Humphrey is no little man in England. 
First, note that he is near you in descent ; 
And should you fall he is the next wUl mount. 
Me seemeth then, it is no policy — 
Respiting what a nincorous min<l he l)eai-s, 
And his advantage following your dtn — 

Tiiat he should come al)out your myal person, 
Or be admitted to your highness* council. 
By flatteiy hath he won the commons* hearts ; 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



123 



And, when he please to make commotion, 
'Tis to be fcai-ed they all will follow him. 

Shahspeare. 

* Small curs ' kc. — there is no iiTf*07r}) of the <fec. 

* No little niiin * — ov tCjv Tv\6yrtji'. 
*Near yuu in descent.' — Soph. Anf. 174. 

* It is no policy ' — ov \mi riXij. 

* Come about ' — eftireXni^fif. 

* *Ti8 to l>e feiircd ' ifcc. — 1 fear that he may breathe 
into them some common hatreil. 



Exercise 19 (a). 

bdariiis. A goodly day not to keep house, a\ ith such 
Whose roof's as low as ours ! Stoop, boys : this 

gate 
Instnicts you how to adore the heavens ; and bows 

you 
To a morning's holy olhec : the gates of monarchs 
Ai-e arch'd so high that giants may jet through 
And keep their impious turljans on, without 
GrOod-moriX)W to the sun. — Hail, thou fair heaven, 
We house i' the rock, yet use thee not so hardly 
As prouder livei-s <lo. 

Guulf>i'ius. Hail heaven ! 

Ai-virtujus. Hail heaven ! 

B, Now for our moimtain si>ort ! up to yon hill ; 
Your legs are yomig ; I'll tread the^e flats. 

' A goodly day ' ckc— a light more beautiful, than 
(for us) sitting (jiuovfjilr possessing our roof so smail. 



W 



m 



VMMM'sSiSS&aes&AZ: 



* J • ^ 



^'•i-t. 






124 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

* Bows you to a monim<,'*s ' itc. — l)eudiiig your 
head to niomiug prayers (so far, five lines). 

* Are arched so high * — ovru) vyl^ovc (tt {it:ovai. 

* And keep' ttc. — uiilioly furftai and all (according 
to the usual phrase with nvrtk), 

* We use thee not' ttc. — uevei-theless Trowvfiiiiu 
&fHiy no less than those w^ho, <S:c. 

*IIail, heaven' — give eacli a line; and after the 
second * Hail ' insert the woixls, * a third time/ ^^^ 
^sch. Cho. 876. 

' Now for ' tSrc. — see that we begin — oirwr with 
ftit. (thi-ee lines to tlio end). 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



Exercise 19 (/>). 

Consider, 
When you above perceive me like a crow, 
That it Ls place which lessens and sets off; 
And you may then revolve wliat talos I have told 

you 
Of courts, of princes, of the tricks in war : 
This service is not service, so \mn<; done, 
But being so allowed : to apprehend thus, 
Draws us a pix)fit from all things we see : 
And often, to our comfoi-t, shall we find 
Tlie sharded beetle in a sjifcr hold 
Than is the full-wing'd eagle. O this life 
Is nobler, tluui attending for a check ; 
Richer, than doing nothing for a bribe ; 
Pi-oiider, than rustling in unpaiil-for silk : 
Such gjiins the cap of him that makes him fine, 
Yet keeps his book uncross'd. — ,S/t(tkspeare. 



125 



* That it is place ' &c.— (make two lines of this 
one) ; consider then that as (ev ^^fp) we stand, thus 
the same man shows less or gieater. 

' So allow'd'— u^tw«£i. 

* To apprehend thus * tfec— to him wlio reflects on 
this, theit? in profit in those things which one sees. 

* And often ' etc.— (four lines). And the heiu-t is 
comforted by reflection whenever we see a safer epi^oc 
given to the beetle defended by small scales than the 
long-wingeil eagle. 

* A check ' — tVt/rrfAa/. 

* Richer »fcc. prouder' &c.—a preferable wealth 
<kc. ... a Ix'tter boast ttc. 

* Such gains' itc. — Such men as he wlio wrought 
the splendid clothes i-evereuces at sight, and writes-oflf 
(iinyf}a'(Jti) no debt. 



Exercise '20 (a). 

I cannot tell, if to depart in silence, 
Or bitterly to s|)eak in your i-eproof. 
Best fitteth my degree, or yom- condition : 
If, not to auswer, — you might haply think, 
Tongue-tied ambition, not re]>lying, yielded 
To Ihjju the g(ilden yoke of sovei-eignty, 
Whicli fondly you would here impose on me : 
It' to repix)ve you for this suit of yours. 
So seasoned with your faithful love to me. 
Then, on tlu; other side, I checked my friends. 
Therefore, to S|>eak, and Ui avoid the fii-st, 
And then, in s|)eaking, not to incur the last, 
Definitively thus I answer you. 



i 



-'jr;..'."v '<"« 



126 EXERCISES IN THE COMrOSITION OF 

' If to tlepiirt ' .Vc— wheiher departing &c, ... or 

reproaching »fec I shall bett^'r further (airivctu) 

what befits me and you. 

^ So seiisomnr .Vc— to". "ch a i»roof of faithful 

love. 

* First— last ' — tc^lrtt — Tuh. 
" Definitively ' — a» \w Xoyy. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



127 



Exercise 20 (/>). 
Your love deserves my thanks ; but my desert, 
ITnmeritable, shuns your high re<iuest. 
Fii-st, if all obstacles wei*e cut away, 
And that my path wei-e even to the ciown, 
As the Y\\ye revenue and due of birth ; 
Yet so much is my i)overty of spiiit. 
So mighty and so many my defects, 
Tliat I would rather hide me from my greatne^^a, 
Being a bark to brook no luiglity sea, 
That in my gi-eatness covet to Ix* hid. 
And in the vapour of my gloiy smotherM. 

S7taks])^are. 

* Desert unmeiitable '— u£m in alia. 

* If all obstacles ' itc— If nothing were in the way 
and thi-ough a straight road, according to relationshii) 
to the king (Soph. Ant. 174), it wei-e possible to obtain 
some not unseasonable lot. 

* F>eing a bark ' Ac— a ship [too] small to make 

trial -leiit sea. 

* Smothei*ed ' — lEaiaruvfiai. 







Exercise 21 (a). 

To be thus is nothings 
But to be safely thus.— Our feai-s in Banquo 
Stick deep, and in the royalty of natiu-e 
l^eigns tliat which would be feai-ed : 'tis much he 
dares, 

And to that diuntiess temper of liis mind, 

He hath a wisdom that dotli guide his valour 

To act in safety. Thei-e is none but he 

AVliose l^eiug I do fear; and under him 

My genius i.s reljuk'd, a« it is &iid 

Mark Antony's was by Caesar. He chid the sisters, 

\Vhen fii-st they put the name of king upon me. 

And bade them sjieak to him. 

* Sticks deep.' See Soph. A7. 1311. 

*To that dauntless' .tc— there sits-beside liis 
corn-age r^ Ewetov, such as to govem his valiant heart 
to act in safety. 

'As it is saidMc-as ihoy say Anto.uus ^e^ov- 
Hi rat TTpor Ca?sar. 

*TIie sisters' — Tfunfro] t:6fmi. 

' Put the name of king upon me '—mimed on me 
the royal k\pc('nf£. 



Exercise 21 (b). 

Then, prophet-] ike 
Tliey hailM him father to a line of kings. 
Ui)on my head they plac'd a fruitless crown, 
And pit a ban-en sceptre in my gripe, 
Tlience to be ^^^-enoh'd with an unlineal hand, 







tf 



c 



S*! ^ V ■• - 




128 EXERCISES IX THE COMPOSITION OF 

Ko son of mino succee<ling. If 't be so, 

For Baniiuo's Issue Imvo I fil'd my minfl, 

For them the gmcious Duncan have I murfler'J, 

Put nvncoms in the vessel of my peaee 

Only for them ; and mine etemiil jewel 

Given to the common enemy of man. 

ShaksjKare, 

* Father to a line' — that he should l>e (fut. opt.) 
father of royal seed. 

* Crown * — rrriipog. 

* Thence to he wivnchod ' — the apTrnyt) of the 

foi-eign right-hand. 

*Have I fil'd my mind'— I sbimed my heart with 

pollution. 

* Put rancouis ' etc.— filled up my once happy bowl 

with cui-secl poisons. 

* Mine eternal jewel * — the immortrd x'V^c of good 

fame. 



GREEK lAJIBIC YERSE. 



129 



Exercise 22. 

Lucio, Give *t not o*er so: to him again, intreiit him ; 

Kneel down bi»f<M-e him, hang upon his gown; 

You ai^ too cold : if you should nt^d a pin, 

You could not with more tame a tongue desu-e it. 

To him 1 say. 
Jmbella. ^lust he needs die 'i 

Aiujelo. Maiden, no remedy. 

h. Yes, I do think that you might pardon him, 

And' neither heaven nor man grieve at your 
mercy. 



"&-, 



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■i'^**?^ 






An, T will not do 't. 

^^' Bwt can you, if you would ? 

An, Look, wliat I will not, that I cannot do. 

Is. But might you do 't, and do the world no wrong. 

If so your heart were touched with tliat remorse ' 

As mine Is to him ? 

f ^' ,^ He is sentenc'd : 'tis too late. 

Lu, You are too cold. 

Is. Too late ? why no : I that do speak a word, 
May cidl it l>ack again : well believe this, 
No cei-emouy that to gi-eat ones 'longs, 
Not the king's ci-o^^-n, nor the deputed swonl, 
The marshal's truncheon, nor the judge's robe, 
Become them with one half so good a gi-ace 
As mercy does. If he had been as you, and you 
as he, - 

You would have slipt like him ; but he, like you, 
Would not have been so stem. ^hakspeare, ' 

Give * Lucio ' five lines. 
* You are too cold '— »).76' 5pa. 
A pm — something cheap. 

' You could not ' <l'c.— you would not ply a ciuieter 
tongue. * 

'If so yoiir heart ' cfec.-if pity for him touched 
thine as [it does] my heart. 

^ * He is sentenced ' <fec.— you come forward too late 
since sentence-is-given (partic. of IokIu^), 
' You are too cold.' Make a whole line. 

* Deputed '—^id^oxoc 

* Become them ' <fec.— no estimation of these be- 
comes him so that compassion does not twice-as much 
exceed. [So that not— ro fit) ov.] 

K 



■jkJ 










l.*-''. 




m 










130 



EXEKCISE8 IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



' K he had been ' kc. — if his /xt'poc had fallen to 
thee &c. 



Exercise 23 (a). 

I see a man's life is a tedious one ; 
I have tirM myself, and for two nights together 
Have made the gioiind my Ixjd : I should be sick, 
But that my resolution helps me. Milford, 
When fi-om the mountain-top Pisjinio show'd thee, 
Thou wa«t within a ken. Jove, I think 
Foundations fly tlie wretched ; such, I mean, 
Where they sliould lie i-eliev'd. Two l)eggai's told 

me 
I could not miss my way ; will poor folks lie, 
That have aftiictions on them, knowing 'tis 
A punishment or trial ? Yes, no wonder, 
When rich ones scju'ce tell true : to lapse in fuh^^-^ 
Is soi-er, than to lie for need ; and falsehood 
Is more in kings, tlian beggars. 

*For two nights together' <fec. — lying - on - the- 
ground I have obtained (Xayj^aiw) a bed the last two 
nights (gen.). By enduring I have managed {iTrapKtw) 
not to be sick. 

* Milford — Pisanio * — \i^t)t — UtKruyuff}. 

* Such 1 moan ' &c. — at least where one ought to 
obtain aTrotrrpo^i). 

* Knowing 'tis * kc. — knowing that it is eitKi .. 
irpotrftoXi) or an tXtyxoc rpitTrtor, 

*To lapse in fulness' — a^irXaki'ti' from an abun- 
dant life. 







^St'S-^i 



13 






Ky^ 



i 



«^' ^•cW»*-'f*^ . 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



131 



Exercise 23 (b). 

My dear lord I 
Thou aH one o' the false ones : now I think on thee 
My hmiger's gone ; but even before, I was 
At point to sink for food.— But what is this 1 
Here is a path to it : 'tLs some Siivage hold : 
I were best not call ; I dare not call : yet famine. 
Ere clean it o'erthi-ow nature, makes it valiiint. 
Plenty and peace breeds cowards ; hardness even 
Of hardiness is mother.— Ho ! Who's here ? 
If anything that's civil, speak ; if savage, 
Take or lend.— Ho ! No answer? Then I'll enter. 
Best dmw my sword ; and if mine enemy 
But fejir the sword hke me, he'll scarcely look on 't 
Such a foe, good heav'ns ! S/mkspeare. 

' Thou art one * itc— dost thou belong (teXw) to 
the false? o \ / 

* What is this 1 a path ' ike.— to what roof does the 
path lead? 

J I dare not call ' A-c.-I have not courage to call 
—but atTiria emboldens nature before it fall all- 
desti'oyed. 

* Ho ! who's here ? ' &c.— who Ls m the flates 1 if 
hospit^ible, siK^ak; but if I call an inhosjut^able, give 
food, for I sliall pay (gen. abs.) back, or taking (nom ) 
gold. (Thi-ee lines.) ^^ '^ 

' Ho ! no answer? ' d^c— I wiU enter, since I hear 
no one's voice. Yet I will draw my sword first. For if 
l^e enemy fears in-the-same-way jis I, there Ls no fear 
that he will not (^,) oh) tui-n away. A nice sort of 
(ndvQ Tit) waiTior as it seems I am. (Five lines.) 

K 2 










132 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



Exercise 24 (a). 

Paulina. I am sorry for 't : 

All faults I make, when I shall come to know them^ 
I do repent. Alas ! I have show'd too much 
The rashness of a woman. He is touch'd 
To the nohle heart. — What's gone, and what's past 

help, 
Should l)e {Kist gi-ief : do not receive affliction, 
At my petition, I heseech you ; lather. 
Let me be punished that have minded 3'ou 
Of what you should forget. Now, gootl my liege. 
Sir, royal sir, forgive a foolish woman : 
The love I boi-e your (jueen — lo, fool again !^ 
I'll speak of her no moi-e, nor of your children ; 
I'll not i-omember you of my own lord, 
Who is lost too. Take your patience to you, 
And I'll say nothing. 

*I have show'd too much* ike. — being female I 
have .show'd aiwvXia too much. 

* He is touched ' <fec. — (see Soph. Aj, 938). 

*Let me be punish'd' «kc. — I am rather deserv- 
ing of punishment, to obtjiin it, who reminded you &c. 

* Tlie love I bore ' <tc. — love of the queen bade me 
(^Trporpenu)) say so much — alas ! for my folly — a 
second time I have eiTed. 

* Who is lost too ' — who has gone U- Tpirun, 



Exercise 24 {h), 

Leantes. Thou didst speak but well, 

When most the truth, which I receive much better^ 



I 



=fvi 



GREEK IAMBIC VEKSE. 



133 



Th^tn to 1^ pitied of thee. Prythee, bring me 
lo the d«ul bodies of my queen and son 
One gi-ave shall l)e for both : upon them'shaU 
The causes of theii- death appear, unto 
Our shame perpetual. Once a day Til visit 
The chapel where they lie; .md t^ars shed there 
bhaU l^ my recitation : so long as nature 
^^ 111 l)e;u- up with this exemse, so long 
I daily vow to use it. Come and lead me 

To the.se sonx)ws. oj j 

o/iaA'speare. 

'Which I m^ive' .tc._which I receive of you 
rather than tliis pity. ^ 

' T«u^ shed thei-e ' .tc.-aad tear-shedding there I 
wiU myself feed (,5™.„XoO/,„,) my o»vn regretr 



EXEECISE 25 («). 

It must be by his death ; and, for my part 
1 know no pei-sonal cause to spm-i, at liim 
But for the geneml. He would be crown'd • 
How that might ckinge his natiu-e, there's the 
question. 

It is Uie bright day that brings forth the adder, 
thS cmves wary walking. Crown himj- 

That at hLs wdl he may do danger with. 
lb abuM; of greatness i.s, when it disjoins 
Remoi-se fmm power; and, to sp«tk truth of Ciesar 
I have not known when his aifectioas sway'd 
Move than his reason. 






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-'' J. 









!'0g^^y:?M:;^^ 



1 






J/-^' ■ f^t - 1 



134 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSTTTOy OP 



*It must be' ike. — He must die so that thei*e 
things have accomplishment. 

* No personal cAuse ' etc. — no cause, for my own 
pai-t, for which we should overthrow him \aKnart)Toy, 

' He would be crown'd * — he desires tlie throne. 
*And that craves* &c. — and bids the traveller 
walk with cai*eful foot. 

* Crown him 1 that ' A'C— grant {kat a)) he h.-m re- 
ceived the power of royal thrones — how thinking him 
worthy of this shall we not put in him a sting &c. 

<Th' abuse' &c, — a£/a>^a ynTifuSiv disgiiiceful 
habits, if it separates to Lttuikiq from power. 

* Affections — reason ' — Bv^oq — (jtpivtf:. 



ExtKciSE 25 (b). 

But 'tis a common proof, 
That lowliness is young ambition's ladder, 
Whereto the climber-upwanl tunis \iii< face ; 
But when he once attains the upmost round, 
He then unto the ladder turns his back, 
Looks in the clouds, scorning the base de: 
By wliich he did tiscend. So Caesar may : 
Then, lest he may, prevent : and since the quarrel 
Will bear no colour for the thing ho is. 
Fashion it thus : that what he is, augmented, 
Would run to these, and these extremities ; 
And therefore think him as a serpent's eggy 
Which, hatch'd, would as Ids kind grow mischievous, 
And kill him in the shell. Hhakspeare, 

* Scorning the base degrees' — Xtywr irap' ohltr the 
circles beneath. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



135 



' So C»sar may ' Ac— and lest C^sar do (Tri^rvo,) 
the same, one ought to anticipate [him]. 

'Since the quari-el' cfcc.-since the accusations 
have not justice while he Ls yet such. 

* These and these*— ra Kat rn. 

'Which hatch'd' kc-ln time if one hatch it 
{iKkE^ur), hkely-to-show its inherited UphQ Trarpoc) 
habits. ^ ' 

' In the shell '—(see ^sch. Fraym. 390). 



Exercise 26. 

Now this extremity 
Hath brought me to thy he»irth : not out of hope, 
Mistiike mo not, to save my life ; for if 
I had fear'd death, of all the men i' th' world 
I would have Voided thee; but in mere spite. 
To be full quit of those my banishei-s, 
Stand I l,efore thee here. Then, if thou lijist 
A heai-t of wi-eak in thee, that will i-evenge 
Thine own particular wrongs, and .stop those maims 
Of shame seen thi-ough thy countiy, speed thee 
straight. 

And make my miseiy serve thy tuni : so use it, 
That my revengeful services may prove 
As benefits to thee ; for I will fight 
Against my canker'd country with the spleen 
Of all the under fiends. But if .so be 
Thou dar'st not this, and that to prove more 
lortunes 

Thou art tir'd, then, in a woi-d, I also am 
Longer to live most weary, and present 










I 












*«,- ■-■i '•/.:'.' .: 



^'•i - • . ' 



■,- ■ * 




\ ;'^T'^..■•f:'t^■iV'■ 







136 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OP 



My throat to thee, and to thy ancient malice : 
Which not to cut would show thee but a fool, 
Since I have ever folio w'd thee with hate, 
Di-.iwn tuna of blood out of thy counti-y's bi-east, 
And cannot live but to thy shame, unless 
It be to do thee service. Shakspeare. 

*Now this extremity* ttc. — Being thus I am here 
itc. . . . nor think me to l>e pi-esent as if to save 
(partic.) my life. 

* Thine o\\*n particular* «tc. — all the evils that 
thou hast suffered, and all that disgi-ace {Xv^aivo^ai) 
thy country with shame. 

* That my i^evengeful * kc, — using the benefit of 
my suffering, may'st thou work out revenge. 

*■ With the spleen * ifec. — nourishing in this heai-t 
the hatred of the nether gods. 

*I also am* ttc. — I bid fai-ewell to the hated 
hours of piL«;sing life. 

*To cut'— (see Eur. Or. 291). 

* Since I have ever' <J:c. — for what (oTa) I have 

CJist upon thee arvyrwr 'ix*^*'' 

*And cannot live* &c. — and now should shame 
thee otherwise unless hastening thy good. 



Exercise 27. 



Then fare ye well, ye citizens of Ghent ! 
This is the lj\st time you will see me hei-e. 
Unless God prosper me past human hope. 
I thank you for the dutiful demeanour 
Which never — no, not once — in any of you 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



137 



Have I found wanting, though severely tried 
When discipline might seem without i-eward. 
Fortune has not been kind to me, good fiiends ; 
But let not that deprive me of yom* loves, 
Or of your good report. Be this the word ; 
My rule was brief, cjilamitous — but just. 
Ko glory which a pix>sperous fortune gilds, 
If shorn of this addition, could suffice 
To lift my heiui; as high as it is now : 
This is that joy in which my soul is strong, 
That there is not a man amongst you all, 
Who c^n i-eproach me that I used my power 
To do him an injustice. J/. Taylor, 

' Unless God ' *kc. — Unless some fortmie incline 
even beyond hope. 

'Though severely tried* &c. — for obedience (7r£t- 
Bapxia) never failed, although seeming unrewarded. 

*But let not' itc— Shall I therefore (dfm fxii) 
fall-out of your dear hetuts, and good i-epute 1 

' No glory ' *tc. — for if I failed of such words, I 
would not rather pride myself in golden gifts, nor in 
miimpaii-ed xXictj, than in the present fortunes. 

*That I used my power' &c. — that trusting in 
power I have yet injiued anyone. 



Exercise 28 (a). 

My fault beuig nothing (as I have told you oft) 
But that two villains, whose fjilse oaths prevailed 
Before my jjeifect honour, swoi-e to Cymbeline, 
I wiiB confederate with the Komans : so, 






-... ■ -T ■faiaiaiS^SiietkaB 



iaaffifetflisSiiiiifiilySfcii 



.^^-^T^^^ 



I 



138 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



FollowM my banishment : and tins twenty years 
This ix)ck, and these demesnes, have been my world ; 
Where I have lived at honest fi-eedom, paid 
More pious debts to heaven, than in all 
The fore-end of my time. 

* My fault ' ifec. — but having nothing sinned myself 
— and remember (imp.) hearing this often already said 
(two lines). 

* Whose false oaths* <l:c.— conquering my fiiitliful 
opiiu/fiara w itli their sworn lies. 

* I was confederate ' &c. — that I was secretly (use 
Xa>0a»'w) assisting ((Tv^TrafmoTarw) the Romans. 

' This twenty yeai-s ' — now is the twentieth summer 
commensumte with my banishment. 



Exercise 28 (b). 

But, up to the mountiiins ! 
This is not hunter's hinguage. — He that strikes 
The venison fii-st shall be the lord o' the feast ; 
To him the other two shall minister, 
And we will feiu- no poLson, which attends 
In place of greater state. I'll meet you in tho valleys. 
How hard it is to hide the sparks of nature ! 
These boys know little they are sons to the king ; 
Nor Cymbeline di-eams that they are alive. 
They think they are mine ; and, though train 'd up 

thus meanly, 
I' the cave wherein they bow, their thoughts do liit 
The roofs of palaces ; and nature prompts them. 
In simple and low things, to prince it, much 
Beyond the trick of others. Shakspeare. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



139 



* But up ' (fee. — but, for this talk is not Trpoc huntei-s, 
go ye to the hills. 

* Which attends* — trvvoiKiiv, 

* Know little they are ' kc. — know not [that they 
are] born (pai-tic.) of kingly house. 

*Nor Cymbeline' &c. — and the father speaks of 
them as lost, being as-is-supjwsed {ciidn) k^ i^ov. 

*And nature prompts them* tkc. — and kindred 
nature even in small things raises them to bear a dis- 
position (Xy7/ia) more royal than kut uWovq. 



Exercise 29. 



What a true mirrer 
Were this sad spectacle for secure greatness ! 
Here they, that never see themselves, but in 
The glass of servile flattery, might behold 
The weak foundation u}x>n which they build 
Their trust in human frailty. Haj^py are those 
That knowing, in theii* bii-ths, they are subject to 
Uncertiiin change, are still prepared and arm'd 
For either fortune : a rare principle. 
And with much labour learn'd in wisdom's school \ 
For, as these bontlnien by their actions show 
That their prasperity, like too large a sail 
For theii* small bai-k of judgment, sinks them with 
A fore-right gale of liberty, ere they reach 
The port they long to touch at ; so these wretches, 
Swollen with the false opinion of their worth, 
And proud of blessings left them, not acquired ; 
That did believe they could with giant arms 
Fathom the earth, and were above their fates, 



"Sl!?i|>;^?'*'3^-S4-WJf«^;*C'ISfc-;aW 






'■^r- 



tS-S-.-s'T^ 






•■l.^ 



^'T'-p'- •^' 



^::s,-i 



140 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OP 

Thoeeborrow'd helps, that did support them, vanished, 
Fall of themselves, and by unmanly suffering 
Betray their proper weakness, and make known 
Theii- boasted gieatness was lent, not their own. 

* For secure greatuess/— To those who fancy they 
walk (perf.) in safe xX/t^i?. 

* Here they ' &c. — At all events to him who never 

beholds himself save &c here it is ix)ssible to see 

that he is building-up ttc. 

* Happy are those ' iVc— But all who, seeing that 
they share from youth the double fate of uncertain 
changes, Ijeing armed trrfpyovm, I call happy. 

*A i-are principle* tfec— For they leara by ex- 
perience, and this is a rare find and not without 
trouble. 

^ * That their prosi^rity ' itc— that in being not cer- 
tainly successfid, fi-eedom sinks (aorist) ai> a superfluous 
.sail of a small botit dips the sheet when the wind is 
astern. 

* And were above their fates '—and boasting their 
own strength greater than the fates. 

' And make known ' itc— and then their boast is 
proved [to be] foreign, not their o\%ti. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



141 



Exercise 30. 

Look, what I speak, my life shall prove it true : — 
That Mowbray hath received eight thousand nobles, 
In name of lendings for your highness' soldiei-s, 
The which he hath detiiin'd for lewd employments, 



like a false tniitor, and a peijur'd villain. 

Besides, I say, and will in battle prove, 

Or here, or elsewhei-e, to the fm-thest verge 

That ever was survey 'd by English eye, 

That all the treasons, for these eighteen years 

Complotted and contrived in this land. 

Fetch from false Mowbi-ay their first head and spring. 

Farther I say, and farther will nuiintiiin 

Uix>n his bad life to make all this good, 

That he did plot the duke of Gloster s death ; 

Suggest his soon-believing advei-sju-ies. 

And, consetpiently, like a traitor coward, 

Sluic'd out his innocent soul through streams of 

blood; 
Which blood, like sacrificing Abel's, cries 
Even from the tongueless caverns of the earth 
To me for justice, and rough chastisement; 
And, by the glorious worth of my descent, 
This arm shall do it, or this life be spent. 

S/iakspeare, 

' Eight thousand nobles *— ten thousand drachms. 
' In name of «kc.— as if to lend hldei^ &c. 

* For lewd employments '—ra fn) Tr^cVorra. 

* To the furthest verge ' <fec.— to as much of land as 
any Englishman ever saw in a cii-cle. 

' For these eighteen years '~tov TrnXXrw xpovov. 

' Farther ' d'c— Besides this I say and besides this 
by destrojing his faithless life I will prove ^see ^sch 
Sup. 276). ^ 

* Suggest ' (fee— and pei-suaded his enemies quick 
to obey. 

* Sluic'd out*— (see Eur. Bac. 479). 






TP*^*»» V t *'■ 






142 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



143 



' Like sacrificing A\)eVs ' — tV rpoiroiQ of the sacrificer 

Abel. 

* To me for justice ' «kc. — and claims to obtain me 

for an avenger. 

Exercise 31. 

Cleonienes. The climate's delicate, the air most sweet, 
Fertile the Isle, the temple much sui-passing 
The common praise it bears. 

Dion. I shall report, 

For most it caught me, the celestial habits, 
(Methinks, I so should term them,) and the reverence 
Of the grave wearers. O, the sacrifice ! 
How ceremonious, solemn, and unearthly 
It was i' the offering. 

Cleo. ^^^^y ^^ ^^^> *^® bui-st 

And the ear-deafening voice o' the oracle, 
Kin to Jove's thunder, so sui-piis'd my sense. 

That I was nothing. 
j)l^ If th* event o* the journey 

Prove as successful to the queen, — be 't so ! — 

As it hath been to us rai-e, pleasant, speedy, 

The time is worth the use on 't. 

Cleo. ^reat Apollo, 

Turn all to the Ijest ! These proclamations, 

So forcing faults upon Hermione, 

I little like. 
/){, The violent carriage of it 

Will clear, or end, the business : when the oracle, 
(Thas by Apollo's great divine seal'd up,) 
Shall the contents discover, something rare 
Even then will rush to knowledge. Shakspeare. 



* The air most sweet ' &c. — and sunny breezes of 
winds pass-over {frrii-^u)) the fertile plains of the 
island. 

'For most it caught me' — which most I was 
astonished at seeing. 

* Ceremonious ' — two^oq. 

* Ear-deafening voice' &c.— (see^sch. Eum. 567). 

* If th' event ' <fec.— if, as the way [is] swift and 
plcfising to us (arr/bi£i'og agi'ceing with * us ') — for would 
that it so happened — so our return were safety-bearing 
to the queen &c. 

* I little like '—(see Em-. EL 622). 

* The violent caniage ' &c.— but be sure that from 
this great haste these things will be either dissolved 
(part, with ay) or accomplished. 



Exercise 32. 
He that fejii-s death or tortures, let him leave me • 
The stops that we have met with crown our conquest. 
Common attempts are fit for common men ; 
The rai-e, the rarest spirits. Can we be daunted ? 
We that have smiled at sea at certain ruins. 
Which men on shore but hazarded would shake at? 
We that have lived free in despite of fortune, 
Liiughed at the outstretched aim of tymnny, 
As still too short to reach us, shall we faint'now ? 
No, my brave mates, I know your fiery temper. 
And that you can, and dare, as much as men. 
Calamity, that .severs worldly friendships. 
Could ne'er divide us ; you ai-e still the same. 
The constant followers of my banished fortunes, 



■^5 



USSb^M^i^^i^}^^-^ i^ -4Av^l.^^iy^3i^!4i;^i$s^^ 












if^r- ■ v-T^n?' 



144 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



145 



The iiLstruments of my revenge, the hands 
By whicli I work, and fashion all my pixyect*;. 

Fletclicr, 

* The stops ' — Tujjnro^wy. 

* Common * — o rv)(^uty. 

* Rare ' TTifiHTfTOQ. 

* On land ' — ^epaaloQ. 

* Hazarded ' — fiiWtov. 

*■ We that have lived ' kc. — who would weary now^ 
living freely »fec. — who has blamed the outstretched 
hand of vfipi^ as wanting commenKurate length. 

* Calamity ' kc. — Ill-success has loosened the bond 
for m&ny, not yet for us. 

* The hands by which ' lirc. — by the vmwfjyia of 
whose hands dtc. 



Exercise 33. 



Gleruloxoer, I say, the esirth did sliake when I was bonu 

Uotajmr. And I say, the earth was not of my mind, 
If you suppose, as fearing you it shook. 

G. The heavens were all on fire, the earth did tremble. 

U, 0, then the earth shook to see the heavens on fire, 
And not in fear of yovu- nativity. 
Disease<l natui*e oftentimes breaks forth 
In sti'ange eruptions ; oft the teeming earth 
Is with a kind of colic piuch'd and vex'd 
By the imprisoning of unruly wind 
Within her womb ; which, for enlargement striving. 
Shakes the old beldame earth, and topples down 
Steeples and moss-grown towers. At your birth 
Our grandam earth, having this distempemture, 



In passion shook. 
G, CoasLn, of many men 

I do not bear these crossings. Give me leave 
To tell you once again, that, at my biith, 
The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes ; 
The goats mn from the mountains, and the herds 
Were strangely clamorous to the flighted fields. 
These signs have marked me exti-aordinary ; 
And all the courses of my life do show 
I am not in the roll of common men. 

Slioksinare, 

* Was not of my mind ' — ov rufia (l>povuv» 

* O then ' ifec. — yes (ye), seeing the blaze of <fec. 

' Is with a kind of colic ' ike— being smitten, is 
pricked by some woe, when the imruly blast has been 
shut up in the i-ecesses tkc. 

* Beldame ' — TraXcuyti //c. 

' Having this distempemture ' — ^wovcra with such a 
disease. 

* Of many men ' kc. — there are some whom hearing 
I would not bear {<nixofiai, impf. indie.) that with 
which you have now dislionoured me. 

* Were clamorous ' — tppodovy. 

* These signs* »fcc.— these were not signs of the 
ordinary man. 

' In the roll of — teXuh' eig. 



Exercise 34. 



* Now, men of death, work forth your will, 
For I can sufier, and be still ; 






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146 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOislTlON OF 



GREEK TAMmr VERSE. 



147 



And come he slow, or come lie fast, 

It is but Death who comes at last.' 

Fixed was hei- lo()k, and stem her aii* j 

Back from her shoulders sti*eamed her hair ; 

The locks, that wout her brow to shade, 

Stand up erectly fi-om her head : 

Her figiu-e seemed to rise moi*e high ; 

Her voice despair's wild ener^^r 

Had given a tone of prophecy. 

Appjvlled the astonishal conclave sate : 

With stupid eyes the men of fate 

Gazed on the light iuspirc<l foi-m, 

And listened for tbe avenging storm : 

The judges felt the victim's dread ; 

No hand wj\s moved, no word was said ; 

Till thus the Ablxjt's doom was given, 

Raising his sightless bills to heaven : — 

* Sister, let thy soitows oea&e ; 

Sinful brother, part in peace ! * Scott, 

* Now, men of death ' itc. — now (ye) to whom it 
belongs, do to me what is to-be-done. 

* Fixed was her look ' <fec. — thus she spake unturned 
with glaring (yopyutirov) eyes. 

* The locks ' ttc. — and from her head she set-up 
(Jarijfu) the shady curls of her brow. 

* Her voice * tkc. — and, made-savago by ills, she 
uttereil voice as of a prophet. 

* And listened ' ^^c. — ever}one expecting &c. . . . 
suppliant instead-of (cV) a jnd<7(^ exchanged (aXXcirrw) 

fetvr. 

*Let thy sorrows cease* — to this point, let thy 
sufferings be detennined (perf. imper.). 



Exercise 35. 

You might have lived in servitude and exile, 

Or sjife at Rome, depending on the gi-eat ones ; 

But that you thought these things unlit for men, 

And in that thought you then were valiant. 

For no man ever yet changed peace for wai-, 

But he that meant to conquer. Hold that puqiose. 

Thei-e's more necessity you should be such 

In fighting for youi'selves, than they for othei-s. 

He's Iwise that trusts his feet, when hands are armed. 

Methinks I see Death and the Fiuies wjxiting 

Wliiit we will do, and all the heaven at leisure 

For the gi*eat spectacle. Draw then your swords : 

And if our destiny envy your virtue 

Tlie honour of the day, yet let us care 

To sell oiu*8elve8 at such a price, as may 

Undo the w^oild to buy us. Be7i Joiison. 

* You might have* — v-n-rifix av (make two lines of 
the first). 

* Unfit for men * — ov vpirrnv iv avCfHitri, 

* There's more necessity ' ttc. — to think thus, more 
to you whose business is it (n-o^a) to defend youi'selves 
than to tliose who endure the battle for others, I 
should sjiy wtus necessaiy. 

* If our destiny ' <fec. — if fortune en\'ying give not 
victory to us bearing-the-prize (uptarEveu). 

* Yet let us care ' »fec. — nevertheless, we could exiict 
such a price for om^ bodies, as to destroy in tm'n the 
whole earth buying us. 



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148 EXEBCTSES IN THE r0Ml'O61ilO^ OF 

Exercise 36. 

I am undono : thci^ is no living, none, 

If Bertifim be si way. It were all one 

Thjit I should love a bright particnhir star, 

And think to wed it, he is so al>ove me : 

In his bright nidiance and collatenvl light 

Miist I be comforted, not in his sphere. 

The ambition in my love thus plngnea itself : 

The hind that would be mated by the lion 

IMust die for love. *Twas pi*etty, though a plague, 

To see him eveiy hour : to sit and di-aw 

His arched bixjws, his hawking eye, liis curls, 

In our heai-t's table ; heart too capable 

Of eveiy line and trick in his sweet favour : 

But now he's gone, and my idolatrous fancy 

Must sfinctify his relics. Shaksjyeare. 

* It were all one ' ttc. — it were alike, if anyone, 
t;iking a itc. . . . were to long for (sec Eur. Bac. 1 255) 
raarriiige, as I am inferior {\ii7rojjLai) to him. 

* In his bright ' itc. — coming near his starry light. 

* Though a plague * — though not without grief. 

* To see him every hour ' kc. — to spend the day 
{irairiiieptmiv) and sitting by to write <tc. (^^Esch. 
P. V. 789). 

* Too capable ' (fcc. — mindful, alas I too much of his 
sweet form, so as to search out all comers of his graces. 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



EXEKCISE 37. 



149 



O, my love ! my wife ! 
Dcjith, that hath suck'd the honey of thy bi'ei\tli. 
Hath had no i>ower yet upon thy l)eauty : 
Thou art not conquer'd : Ijeauty's ensign yet 
Is ciimson in thy li^js, and in thy chfeks, 
And de;ith s piUe Hag is not advanceil thei*e. 
Tybiilt, ly'st tliou there in thy bloody sheet ? 
O, what moi-e favour can I do to thee, 
Than with that hand that cut thy youth in twain, 
To simder his that w;is thine enemy ? 
Foi-give me, cousin ! Ah, de^ir Juliet, 
Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believe 
The unsubstantiail death is amorous ; 
And that the leiin abhorred monster keeiw 
Thee here in dark to Ije his pjxi-jimour 1 
For fejir of that I will still stay with thee; 
And never fiom this palace of dim niglit 
Depart again : here will 1 remain 
With worms that are thy cham))er-maids : O here 
Will I set up my everlasting rest; 
And shake the yoke of inauspicious still's 
From this world-wcu-ied fleslu Shakspeare, 

* Dciith, that hath * ttc. — Hades although making 
thee (riOri^i) not breathing, seems 6:c. 

* Beauty's ensign * ttc. — The faii*-complexioned 
favour <Swj. . . . still Trpinu and has not yet changed 
into (ufiiifiit)) &c, 

* WTiat more favour can T do ? ' — What other favour 
would you wish me vwovpyiifrai ? 



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150 EXERCISES IN THE COMrOSITION OF 

* Shiill 1 believer iSrc.— conjecturmg I might - 
(rvyxai'oi) «fcc. 

* Pammoiir * — (see .^^Esch. Afj. 650). 

' And shake the yoke ' A'c— for I will lighten the 
unfortunate yoke of f^ite from this weary neck. 



GREEK IAMBIC TERSE. 



151 



Exercise 38 (a). 
Duke. 80 then you hope of piiidon from Lord Angelo 1 
Claudia, The miseitible have no other medicine 

But only hojje ; 

I've hope to live, and am piepared to die. 
D. Be absolute for death ; either death or life 

Shall thei-eby be the sweeter. Re^isou thus mth 
life: 

If I do lose thee, I do lose a thing 

That none but fools would keep : a bi-eath thou art, 

Servile to all the skyey intiuences, 

Tliat dost tliis habitation, where thou keep'st, 

Hourly afflict : merely, thou al-t death's fool ; 

For him thou labour'st by thy flight to shun 

And yet runn'st toward him still. Thou art not 

noble ; 
For all the accommodations that thou bcju'st 
Are nursed by baseness. 

* Be absolute for ' — lyk-nnrfpn. 

<Keason thus' 6:c. — For, attach (cu»'«n-rw) these 
arguments to life. 

* I do lose ' »S:c.— Wlio, not being a fool, would 
preserve this miftri^a 1 

*Thou art' dec— Death simply keeps thee as a 



* Accommodations ' — KctTanKiv}), 

(End this piece at the aesura of the sixteenth line.) 



Exercise 38 (b). 

Thou'rt by no means valiant ; 
For thou dost feju* the soft and tender fork 
Of a jKX)r worm : thy best of rest is sleep, 
And that thou oft provok'st ; yet gi-ossly fear'st 
Thy death, which is no more. Thou art not thyself; 
For thou exiat'st on many a thous;ind gi-ains 
That issue out of dust. Happy thou art not ; 
For what thou hast not, still thou strivest to get, 
And what thou liast, forgett'st. Thou art not certain ; 
For thy complexion sliifts to strange effects. 
After the moon. If thou ai*t ricli, thou'rt poor ; 
For, like an jujs whose back with ingots bows, 
Thou bear'st thy heiivy riches but a journey, 
And death unloads thee. 

* Fork of worm ' — upcii' cpaKoyroQ. 

* What thou hast not ' — to Tropaut. 

* What thou hast * — to irapor. 

* For thy complexion ' &c. — for upon unstable 
changes thine eye glances according to the moon. 

(End this piece at the ciesiu*a.) 



Exercise 38 (c). 

Friend thou hast none ; 
For thine own bowels, which do call thee sire. 
The mere effusion of thy proj>er loins, 
Do curse the gout, sei-pigo, and the rheum, 



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152 



EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



153 



For ending thee no sooner. Thou hast nor youth 



nor age, 



But, as it were, an after-dinner's sleep, 
Dreaming on l)oth ; for all thy blessed youth 
Becomes as aged, and doth beg the alms 
Of palsitni eld ; and when thou art old and lich, 
Thou ha.st neither hejit, affection, limb, nor bc^auty, 
To make thy liches plejisant. What's yet in this 
Tliat beurs the name <^)f life 1 yet in this life 
Lie hid moe thousand deaths : yet dojith we fear, 
That makes these o<lds all even. 
(j^ I humbly thank you. 

To sue to live, I find I seek to die ; 
And, se^^king death, find life : let it come on, 

Shaksj^eare, 

* Do cui-se ' kc. — Abuse (ce>'i'a;w) the e^ir»/c, gout 
»Sr^., the blame of slow diseiise. 

* An after-dinner's sleep ' — vttvoq lutn'tov Ita^o^oQ, 

* To make thy riches plesisant ' — a perfecting Ap- 
Ti/^a of thy treasures. 

* Odds — even ' — aimov — 'itrov, 

* I humbly thank you ' — 1 have great obligation to 
thee though Ik tx^iupMv. 



Exercise 39. 



Nisus ei-at poi-tie custos, acerrimus annis, 
H>Tt5icides : comitem ^-Euec-e cpiem misenit Ida 
Venatrix, jaculo celerem levibusque s<igittis : 
Et juxta comes Euryalus, quo pulcrior alter 
Non fuit ^^^^ueadum, Trojana neque induit anna : 
Ora puer prima signans intonsi\ juventa. 



His amor unus erat, paiiteixjue in Wla ruebant ; 
Tum quoquc commimi portam statioue teiiebant. 
Nisus ait, ' Dine hunc ardorem mentibus addunt, 
Euryale ? an sua cuique Deus sit thr,i cupido ? 
Aut pugnam aut aUquid jamduduni invadei*e mag- 
num 
Mens agitat mihi ; ncc placida contenta qiiiete est. 
Cernis, qua; Riitulos habejit tiducia lerum : 
Lumina rjira micant : somno vinoque soluti 
Procubuere : silent late loca. Percipe poiro, 
Quitl dubitom, et qua; nunc animo sententia surgat. 
j^Enean acciri omnes, populusque piti-esque, 
Exposcmit; mitti<|ue vin)s qui certti i-eportent. 
Si tibi, quie jxisco, promittunt ; nam mihi facti 
Fama sat est ', tumulo videor reperire sub illo 
Posse viam ad muros et mccnia Pallantea. Vergil. 

The fii-st three lines make four. 

' ^^neas * — Alvia^. 

' Et juxtsi ' kc, — and together his companion was 
guarding the gates kc. . . . pie-eminent of the (sons) 
of .^iilneas, and all who wear kc. 

*Ora puer' kc. — (see Soph. (J, 7i\ 742). 

* An sua cuique Deus ' kc. — or the desire (infinitive) 
which ndes in eiich (|)lural), is that a God to men ? 

* Nee placida * kv. — nor allows me to oTipyuy in 
idleness. 

* Qui ceiia reix)rtent ' — men to i-eport in what state 
of foilune we ai-e placed (Kut)i<TTtj^i), 

Moenia Pal Ian tea ' — the city of Evander. 



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EXERCISES IN' THE COMrOSITION OF 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



155 



U£ 



Exercise 40 (a). 

Intei-eti pi\'i(lam volitiiiis j^ennjitii per uitem 
Nuntia Fama luit matristjue adlabitur aures 
Euryali : at subitas mLseiU' calor ossa i-elicjuit, 
Excussi maiiibub i-adii revolutique pensa. 
Evolat infelix et femineo nlulatu, 
Scis&i coinam, mui*os amens atque agrnina curau 
Pi-iiiia [>etit, non ilia virum non ilia pericli 
Teloriimque memor ; ccelum dehinc questibus implet : 
* Hiinc ego te, Euiyale, aspicio ? tune ille senecta? 
Sei-a mea? requies? potuisti linquei-e solam, 
Cnulelis? nee te, 8ub tantn i>ericula nibvsum, 
Adfari extremum mis' ne data copia matri 1 * 

*Intcrea' &zq. — As she euqinix3d-for her boy came 
a messenger that he was dead kc. . . . and her limbs, 
as she heard, gi-ew -stiff with cold. 

' Amens ' — nvtiuna in madness. 

* Ccfhim dehinc ' ttc. — she uttei-ed the shaq) ivyfjoQ 
of a shi-ill cry to heaven. 

* Extremnm ' — in last addi-es-s. 



Exercise 40 (h). 

* Hen, term ignota canibus data pneda Latinis 
Alitibiisque jaces, nee te tua funei-e mater 
Produxi, i)iiessive oculos aut volnera lavi, 
Veste tegens, til>i quam noctes feetiua diesque 
Urgebam et tela cnms solalmr aniles. 
Quo sequar 1 aut c|uje nunc artus aA^olsa/jue membra 
Et fiums lacenim tell us habrt ? hoc milii de te, 
Nate, refei's 1 hoc sum termque manque secuta 1 



Figite me, si qua est piettis, in me omnia tela 
Conicite, o Rutuli, me primam absumite feii*o ; 
Aut tu, magne Pater divum, miserere, tuoque 
Invisum hoc detrude caput sub Tartai-a telo, 
Quando aliter necpieo crudelem abrumpei-e vitam.* 
H(x; fletu conciussi animi, moestuscjue per omnes 
It gemitus : toi-pent iufnictje ad pitelia vii-es. 
lUam incendenteni luctus Idjeus et Actor 
Ilionei monitu et multum lacnmantis luli 
Corripiunt, inteixjue mitnus sub tecta i-eponunt. 

' Quam noctes festina ' ttc— which I by night, by 
day (adjectives) was working, an old woman toiling 
with the shuttle. 

'Hocmihide te ' <kc.— surely thou dost not give 
biick (aorist) thy head alone [to me] who followed ? «kc. 

*Torijent infi-acta?* <tc. — all their coui*age, with 
readiness for battle, is let go and gone {(ppovht;). 

* Ilionei monitu' ttc— Thus lulus and Ilioneus 
ordei*ed. 






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156 



BXEBCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



INDEX OF PHEARES AND COMBINATIONS 
CONNECTED WITH NOUNS REPRESENT- 
ING LEADING IDEAS. 

[Cake must be taken, in iisini^ this index, to asceitaiu 
the meaning of the seveml wonls and combinations, ))y 
means of a Lexicon, if necessary. Many other com- 
binations may also be made of the words foimd here, 
which it would have been superfluous to have specifie<l.] 

Age (i. e. old age). yvp«c — irivfiif.mv — cvtriraXaioruv 
— avatciiac TrXioi — yvp^ varfj(^)W(»'£<i — \ivku yZ/p^t 
auifiara — cvaunv^ov tQ y. iXdelv — yi)putQ ia\aToy 
ripfin. yipoi'TU vui^^v ttoco — TrciXaior trio^a — ynp^' 
/5o<TV(ic — yripol^offKUi' — 6 ytipcKTKtoi' j^poroc. 

Blood, (tl^a — notpo ro v — ^Xw^o r — fpf /i »'o V — fiika vBi v, 
iircpotpdopov l^tfipuTiQ lufiaror XiVoc — ai^ia, aifiaro^ 
pouQ TraaaaOai — ioc nl^uirng ^iXiic — cevffai yai«r 
ci/'/^aroc — iri<livpiJi>Tj ^Outy tufiari — yp ai/ia Caip«t- 
ffdai — n'ifiaTi}p(u \ipiQ — a'lfiHTvppvrog^ a/'/iarcuTTOf, 
a'l^iaTorrrayiiq, iriXavoq alfiaroi — (and of kindred) 
trvyyiytQy ifXi^vXiov at — wpot <ftvaiv a^fiaroc- 

Brightness, uktiqj o-cXac, X(i^<7rac, ^t'yyoc — ufifinTufr, 

iiXioVy iififpftc, ovp€irov, L(^la7iov aiXng — XafiiraCtoi' 
aiXdi: — ipiyyog oinua — <paicp6yf ^atri'OK aiXaQ, 

BuBIAL. ro^«c — TV fi floe opdoy X^/^" ratj^v — fiolpav 
Xa\i'iy TaOov — (pfin T(t<pov irorau'tor — rui^w fxij 
^voXdiriaOai — KuTaiTk:u(l>tu rri^ou — aut^a rv^ifuvCat 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



157 



rat^t^ — ra<ppov Ig KoiXjjy TVfjt,flov — opvyfxa rvfiflov 
^€i%'6v — rvfjifloxwaroy ipfia — rvfifloxna yiipwixara. 

Chariot, fip^/a — o\oq — u(}fiaTiov o\(n — rptVwXoi', riOpLTT 
iroVfTiTptapor, iipyiu, also o\i]^a — riTpaopiay ox»/^a^ 
upfitiTUiy — tipfiarwy iirefjifldTriy — KoXXrjriuy v^wy — 
Tirpa^vyoi^ tvKVKXot o\oi — tyrvveiv lirirovc upfiafri — 
iv iTTTTOtc efTTuyai — tiTTruy o^iy/ia irutXiKoy — ^ttttovq 
(piXrjyiovq hf apfxar ayayctr — ctsoyuty x^oai — 
OpavfrayreQ ayrvyuty x^ouc — tKneaely uk ayrvytov 
— rpoxpi — rpu^wy (Tvpiyyeq. 

Child. Trait — iraicuty pXaartifjiara, yoyai — TiKya,Tpi7rTV' 
)(0i riKvufy yoyai — riicytay ^vytapig — EvyeytjQ TEKyuy 
airopa — flXatrraQ •Kurpoq ytvi^Xiovc — 7rai?oc/5Xo«rrac. 
flXuarrijjioy aXcaiyoi'Ta aio^arot; ttoXvv — i^ ov Vei;- 
yutOrj \tuui — trnepfiUy TiKOQy yeyyuloyj dvffrrjyar — 
fTirip^ar ayhpoQ rovCe. 

Country. narpiQ — warft^or oIatoc, 6(iXafjL0Q — Trarpf^uty 
o'tKuty, Trarpjjac X^^*'"C» iCpaiy fltafxoi — Trarpfoy ovlaQ 
\i)oy6c — xarp^oy atrrv yiJQj kariaq flaSpoy — irarpl^og 
tliotiovfityov — ififlarfvitv ircirptCoQ — irarpiCoQ letTt- 
fijjfiiyoQ — or with Trarpa and Trarpwc. See also 

Home. 

Death. "Ai^tjq — CvtruWaprot:'' Ailov Xifiijy — "AiCovBaya- 
(rlfiovg oiKiiTopar — aXufrropec "At^ov yiprtpoi — etc 
Aicov fioXily — ayavyrjroQf aypiogy woyrioc "Ac. — 
QayaroQ — fiolpay Oayiirov -KpodXafluy — irpoc ripfia 
K'iXtrai dayarov — day. lytcapTepely — Oavarov riXog, 
nXevrrj — oe TiSyrjKoregj KiKfitjKOTeQy Bayotn-iQ — da- 
yoyrog ofifia (TvyKXelnai — iKrifffad* aurcp OayaToy 
— yiKptjy epciTTta — yik'vwy (ifityrji'oy tiyaX^a, orKia 
— Cuifia ytprepoy ytKviay — iiKpoy Ta<^)/f ajMoipoy — 
fjtiroiKog ly yttipolg. 



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EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 



Eye. o^f^a — ravpovadai, avfXtyaXe'iv ofi^a — <rvr i£^eii' 
ofXfAa. o/i/iorwv naraoraenc — TV({>\ovtTdaL fiyyog 
dfifittrioi' — TavpofiOfupnv o^^a — caKpvoiQ vt<l>vpfsiyov 
— o^/ia (Tvv KaTJjyopu — Etjpii aK\av(Tra o/i/i«ra — 
o^/warw*' ax^iyiai — Ivrai^oy ofifia (of pi-esence) 
ivffOfaTOi' o/i/ifi (sight) — op0oTg o^/iatrii' 6/)^*' — 
oufiaTUjy ftoXai, Kopai — ctaorpd^oug kopac IXifftrtw — 
cepyfiaruty fioXai — (nro(rrp6(t>ovg ai/y/ic — afrrpa-m) rig 
o^uarutv — irolcy ofifjia varpt cr/XuifTint — uafft — ara^eiy 
aTT* oaautv takpv — ay pioiQ utrtroKTi Traim/iac. 

Fight — Strife — Contest, aywv. ayiia iliivat — uq 

ayCjva av^Tttmli — aywi' kuXXIvikoq — vctcor, fia\i)y 
'Ipic — viiKoq /i"X»?C — ipiCOQ aywi' — uynXXa ^Kpijipopoc 
— ipicOQ KXvdbJV — Epic virXun — ipi^ttf vtlk-ot: K.T.X, 
avfjifiaXeiy — ha fiax^C tc.r.X, eXOi'tr — (k ayutva 
K.T.X, apfiui^eroQ — iy pixp ^opvcy x^P^^'* 

Fire, Flame. Trvp — irvp ayairTuy — ayrjfaltTTf^ irvpi — 
uyyupoy irvp — vir* evayyiXnv Trvpog — irvpug rrapaX- 
\ayai — TTvpoc TTora/iOt iKpay}\(TOiTai — irayitfXtKToy 
^yp — TTvpoQ (pXoya — yavaiv l^flaXiiy ^. — KaOaptrioQ 
— t<pi(mog — aidaXovffaa </)\o^ fiprtyrijg — fipoyT^ Kal 
Kipavviq, (pXoyi — <f>XoyoQ fiiyav wutytura. 

Grief. aXyoc — «X"C — y^^ — Xvinj — (tXyiihvEg — dpfj' 
yf)^ — XOnrjg Trapa^^vxv — yootg nvyijCofiai — oXyoc, 
axog K.T.X. uTTTiTai (f>p€yun — x*^P^'' ^P^^ ^^^P — 7^^^ 
trnyayfjioi — yootc f^TJ/co/iat, lyKE'tfjiai — yoovg Karnp- 
Xouai — trjXifUjjy youfy aotCog — fiiXxpatra Oayaaifjioy 
yl^Qy, — '^^aywyo"^ op^dx^oyrig yooig — ydwi' oitK 
atn'inoyeg (pBoyyoi. See also TEARS. 

Hair. KOfiTj — irXoKa^og — Ko^rjg irXoKafioQ — f^oarpvxoQ 
— iiKi'ipaToi KOfiriQ wXfkoi — UtyOitrnaTa KOfir)^^ ftotrrpv- 
yj^y — KiKaofxiyog nXoKafioy — Covyai irXoKafjLov Tcu^f 



GREEK IAMBIC TERSE. 



159 



— Kojn t) y (iTridpiffa q — arifa vo y <i ^0 \ /3o arpvxoic 

fioaTpvx*»»v ay€ict)fi€iTa — rrXuKUfxay ayalirov KOfitjg 
— KOfiTj akTiyiOTog ^(rnzrai — TzXoKafwv avxfiripoy 
itjypiuftrai. 

Hanging. Ppvxog — aprnvr} — flpoxoy dipy evrpETri^eii' — 
aTTTuy KpEfiafTToi — KpE^atTToig iy fl. })pri)fiiyi] — 
apkuwy l^poxot — fpkrj ftpoxoti — ppoxV A'«'"<^^ft KadijiJi- 
fiiyi] — irXiKra'iaty apTavann Xoi/Sarai fiiov — aprfjaai 
leprfy. 

Home — House. fd//oc — iuffin — irarpfoy Cw^' laria te 
— cutfxarog irTEyaty Icpai — ECpai iraXaiag kariag — 
cCjfia patrtXikoyy rvpavyoy, TvpavyiKuy — tcog iraXfiiov 
Cutfxaroc — TrXtrOi/^^Tc lo^oi — cvjiovg E<pE(TTiovg — 
co^oi KElyraL x«A'"*'r«*«<C — liycpag E^ayKTrarai 
CofAwy, 

Joy. iiioyrj — Xapa — h^oyiig vtto, uvyEka — ftpax^'ia 
TEpxpic ii^oyijg — irdyr Ef^iiTEg ijcoyy — X^PV^ fJETWTroy 
layOrj — x"P^ A*V '♦^'^'^"Vpc (Upirag — cmoXoXvEa xapac 
viro — x^PH^^^^^'j Xiipfioyt'jg Tr)Ttj^EQa — fiah'Erai v^' 
ilCoyfjg. 

King — Royalty, uya^ — rvpavyog — aiao-oc ftaaiXiKoy 
Kapa — trifiag rvpuyt'ov, rvpayyiKoi — kpdrog f^am- 
XiKoy — (TKijiTTpa kai Bpoyoi — (TkfJTrrpa TraXaia yujuay 
fifjKpiJTEiy — (TKiJTTTpa yavpovToi Xal^uty — rvpayvoy 
tiyai ^aXXov y Tvpuvva Cp^i — Tvpayya ToXuay 
(TTTEvhii — X'^P^'^ irpvfiyt'iTTjg (lya^ — ^^PX^yirr^c — yTjg 
Kpart] TE Koi Opoyovg lifiEiy — ctavoi^Eiy Opoyojy — 
iKTrEfftXy Brjyaiu)y dpovuiv. 

Kneeling, yoyv k-afxTTTEiy — irpog ydiayy (zrc'^oi', ovcag) 

katiiyai yoyv — TrpocnriTyEiyj Tripnrrv^ai yopara 

yoytiTLjy irptJToXEia diyydi Ety^ iktTEviiy, l^apTaadai — 
aolg TTpoaTidijfjLi yuyuaiy utXtyag — yoyaaiv i^uTTTELv 



•&■' ...*,'''---' .-•■ 



.\wjf-' 






rj.? '^.;. 



1-50 



EXERCISES IN THE COMrOSITION OF 



(Tu/ftn — TrpofTTriTruxre yovraai — yovyaTiaP t\vuKTaadai, 
See also SurrLiAXT. 

Life — Soul, /j/oc — 4^v\ii — reXog KUfinruy jVov — flloQ 
tif^itiiTOQ — p/oi' eVroi't?!', iKirXijiTaif luCiPrXuy — 
£Kimv(T(ii i//u)(//j', Svftot' — ji^uiToy oyKuttrat fxlyay — 
f^ioy Tftoftia "KOpavruy — (^loy KpvTTTiiy irap'^AiZriy 
— Trpir fjLolpav iiifKeiy j^iov — (nrixpvlEy (iioy — 
Tryivfi avippTfiev ftiov — ripfia trvyrpi'^tiv fliov— 
'4'^XV ^icoyreg iil'oviiy — ^I'v^ffy iy rcK^t^ KaTOiKicrai — 
viay ypv^tiy aniXXftr — \pv\iic dc^ctti'/eroiTe — 4/v\7Jv 
irpolyaWoyr iy Kvi^otm — xl/vyoppayily — 4^v\iJQ 
KOfiitrrpa — ^vx'/'' uO\a Ti6tf.uyr)i' opw. 

Light. See Brightness and Sun. 



Love, t^wc — Trodof;, kitTpoi^ iptoroQ iKirtirXfiypiiy 
HtXiiriipia tputrog — t^wrof iiaadarOiu — iput^ ero^evtre 
— 0€Xli(l}poyi.Q iputrec — itg ipura vitriiy — tryeBeiQ 
tputTi — ?t(i)kadtiy tpiitra — arui^tiy iroflor kut ofifid- 
ru}y — eta ttoOov iXOtly — ^Xi<^upu>y irodoy ivy/ii^eiy — 
(.yrEdipfjayTai ttoBu) — CeCtjyfJieyng troB^ — t<^pi^ ipioTi 
— BaXwEiy Kiap tptjjTi. 

]VLu)NESS. fii/JiTjyag 1]Cj} — a€eX(l>oy opJir fiffjiriyora — 
iiyyiXrjt; ^ayeiQ — /laretc «*.' OEHjy — fiayiaig tiXairtoy 
— ^ayiaaiy XvtTrrtffjiatrif XvatruiQ — OtofiayEl Xvtrtnj 

Marriage. ya/ioi — XiKTpa — Xc'xoc — ya^ily yafioy, 
Xiicrpa, l^atrtXiutg — yttfioy (TvyaTrrtiy — ayoertoy yi'ifiag 
yttfioy — apfioffni TraiCiuy yufiovQ — yafioiQ ftaffiXiKolQ 
ivydi^iTai — viol^TirtQ ydfioi — yd^tty aKei^ifyijt — 
fi^vycc yttfuoy — (pivyovcra (Tvyyeyij ynfxov — XiKTptay 
i.aTipr)^iv7i — Xiurpa %'Vfji<peim)pia — yeoaatoy op<pai'oy 
fiXiwtiy Xi\OQ — XitcrpiMty, evyfJQ auyyofwg — yvfi<ptjg 



GREEK IAMBIC TERSE. 



161 



tfiip<i) TTfTrXrjypevoc — w yvp<l>t7a kqi Xt)(r] — yvfifrj 
oovpiXtj-TTTO^: — 6p(lidyrj ^vvaopov. 

Murder. (r(payt}y (p6iog — Baydfrifiot, avro\£lpECy icapd-* 
TOftoiy (Tipayni — Kaipiovg (rfaydi, — itXtj (Tipdyia Trop- 
Oiyov KTayuy — ey afpayalffi f3d\pa(Ta Eifog — eq 
<T(f>aydg utaai ^tfo^ — o'i\frai a(payfig — (r(f>dyia yiy- 
yaiiov rikiioy — Tricioi' ifAvXf]'7ai (poyov — avQivrr}£ 
<P' — ai/na firjXEiov ftnov — X^'^^* yjpaiyitrdaL (poytt) — 
kiriaxt xiipa fxaifiioaay foyov — (potov KrjKiCy Bpo^ijooi 
— yf\y <pvpdrT(ii' (p6yov — (pvyov o^vfirjvirov ^ikat. See 

also Blood. 

Night — Darkness, yv^ — upifttij — ffk6roQ — ivktoc op^p- 
yaiag OKOTog — opcpyrf (rcoreiyfj^ yvKTOQ — o/jfjia yvKTog 
atrrepwTTOv — yv\iog (tkotoc — vv')(^iovg oviipovc — vvktoq 
a\nyT]Q aKoror^ kvkXoq — rTKf'rrto d^avpovtrdai — iy 
^iTai^^iw tTKorov /jiyei — (TKoroy CEh)pKbjg, 

Sea. OdXafTan — uXc — rroyTOQ — ov ire^offTipriQ — dXi.ivpd 
odog daXdfffrriQ, kv^dTwv — icXv^toy BaXdrrtTLOQ — 
IpoffOQ QuXatraowXaytcrnQ — ftiyboq BaXdffaun — kD/x' 
iKvtpaffat — TTpoQ k'vfiu XaicTii^eii — ^/avXoi, TaXippoia, 
KVftarun — (TTiyujirou irXrjorioy OaXurralov — icXvctoyio) 
TrXrjyf'ina yavg — Kiffin Ki/vXarat fit d^(piCpofjioy — 
dy\i xeXayinQ aXoc — olc^n -rroyrlac aXog — di:ra\ 
itXipftodoi — iiricpopt) vXtjfifjivpicoQ. And metaphori- 
cally KXvtuiyioy kaica>r, X^^^'^y k.t.X. 

Shield — (Defensive armour) — dmrlc — datricos KvkXnc, 
KVTog — dniriffiy TTKppiKtjQ — dmriany boiuiroyoiQ — 
umricojy wXevpai — d\aXk'og dtnri^Dv^-dfrwtg ov trpuKpa 
QpdaovQ — Tcap dtnriloc yvfitwOey ^ftpv — iroXXfiy 
aHpniffac dcnrtca — 7rap'o<r7r/?ac eviiei r — oTrXa — ottXoiq 
yjiVdioitTiy tvirpnrijQ — ynXKryXdrotq ottXoiq rjffKrjfilyof; 






162 EXERCISES IN THE COMPOSITION OF 

— ottXwf UKTTarrjQ — otXw*' iravrtvxio. — Kvi:\a 

Ship. vavg — it:h'riinv iroha — yrjoQ olanuffTpwfxn — inoc 
ittjyT)i'ai (tkch^o^ — rawi' <rroXoc, £/i/3dXot — ravriXity 
o^ii^arn — o\rtfta va6<; TroXvKtorroyj tJKVTTOfjnrot 
ravfTToXEly aXioy vir* tndfia — yavaroXuy rac Iv^- 
iftOpaQ — /3ap/3apot(rt irtXayiffi yavffdXovfieyoy — yav- 
WXw, ynviropi^ TrXcirp — yavQ iyradtlffa trpoQ fiiay 
Wi — \aX^j Tiiyii iroia — cif ayrXoy ifjftilfTTji iroca 
— «r*:a^oc twovTiae — atccKjn] yeiuy vTrriovro, 

Silence, aiyrj — iv<^i)^ia — myiyr TMvlt dritrofiat nipi — 
(Tiyw^eyoy tl^e to kifhoQ — Traira (Tiyrjdi}(nTai — alyn 
TTfWfffjiiyeir — (r/yr; rrTijlitny a^wvot — £u^i?/iia arut — 
iv<pt)^oy Kot^iffTui ffTvfia — yXCJaaay ivfrj^oy (ftipeii 
flrw^t ri)y iv<f>f}iJiiav, 

Sky. aidijp — ovpayoc — o lO/poc, ovpaj'ou 7rTvya\j fivxo\y 
(\yuT:TV\at^ TrXak'a — fiaOoQ utTTipiOKoVj crefxyoy — 
ovpuyiot; TToXot. — ovpayioy e^pay — n/v iy atrrpoiQ 
ovpayov o^oy — Xivpoy olfioy aiOifOQ. 

Sleep. viryoQ — (piXoy vTryov fltXyi/rpo* uttv^ itapa- 

^tiyoQ — pX£</>n/Ki Kot^i'itraiy <n;/i/3aXt7>', viryt^ — afpa- 
iTft6ru)Q vTri-y »'tKW/i£i'oc — Kotfiiaai (ro'fi) \doyl — 6 
TrayroyijptoQ virroq — dyaffraaiy i^ viryov — virrov 
cia^oxpv ^€yy«i — vKva oiri/ioXiroj' &x^^ — ^^ vicyov 
iirToi^iAeyrj — ^waXax^^k vKy<f> — £y€p0£if , kairoXoicriffaQ 
viryoy. 

Spear — Sword — (Offensive arms). £yxoc — ^opv — 
Xf>yx»? — ii<l>oQ — £yx»? (rvyaTTTei^ — ^TOC**^ irpox^ipoy 
apTraerai — £C copoQ raliy fioXely^ eXOily, arfiyai — 
capoc av^fxaxoiy putpt] — iv rporcy ^opoc — ^oplj £c^£i, 
iffToXitTfiiyoi — cupaffi fieratxi^ioii — CopOQ raxtlay 



GREEK IAMBIC VERSE. 



163 



iiXoKa — fjiapyCjy liyai ^opv — lopv^iyoQ — copivt- 
Trie — ^oyx»; hopixoyoi: — fivpiag Xoyx»/t adivot, — 
£<'^oc frpoKurKoyf fieXuyhiToy — licrrofjioi — eg (T^ayac 
tjrrm ^. — XaifiCjy ^liJKe ^. — ^t^£t KaTCLp^Ofiaiy KaTep- 
yai^ofjiaty t:apaTOfji€iy — ott:eloy &X^* ettc £, — eKKtKutm 
iftufTai I. — Kotfiitrai I. 

Stars, aarpftty X'^P''^t ofii)yvpic — ovpayo^ aQpoi^uty 
acrrpa — ixarpuiv vtripripoy f^eXoi — atrrpa itpiapTii 
Oe^ — oCovQ dtrrpwy <paeyyaQ — aKpiroQ acrrptoy X'^P'^C 
— aoTfpuiTroy ovpayov Ziira^ — ^\£ywi' vtt* &(rrpoig 
ovpayoi — aaTputy ayToXa^y ^vmcptTOVQ ^uneii — Trvp 
iryeoyTwv &(TTp(ay xo^ay^' — vayi<piyyiiQ atjrpttty pnrai 
— cicrrpwy UXiXotirey £u<^po>'>/. See also BRIGHT- 
NESS — FiRE. 

Sun. i}Xiot, — ijXiov (piyyuQy er^'Xac, kvkXov^ iiaopq.i — 
a^T'iya uvKXoy 6' iiXiov — hiS,ohoty puTatJTaffiQy KaXXt- 
0eyy£c, x/^vao^cyycf, TedpLTnroy ctp/za, yXiov — 
I^Xiipapoy fjfiipag — TrfXavyeg 6/j.pia ovpayov — 6 wdyTu 
Xtvaaijjy — o Toy aivvy ovpayoy ^KhprfXaTiuy — ayuKToc 
{fXiov<pX6ya — avyaX (TioTiipioi — fiyyog //X. KaTiqiOiro 
— TraroTTTTjy KvtcXoyy fjieffrjfif^piya OnXirrj i^Xiov. See 

also Fire or CnARioT. 

Suppliant. iKioioi — uciTijg — ik£T£vu> — i^utfiio^ tcadH^tTui 
— TrpotTiriTytifiyijfiayayaXfjiadeCjyyrvpayyiKovsOpoyove 
— TTipnrTvtrfTti yoyvy you vara — iKtaioiq trvy icXdcoig 
— ^KTTjpag Tiiyei daXXovg — iKTi]pioig KXnhoitny l^i- 
OTtppiiyoQ — iKyCiTai irpoaTpoKu'ic dtovg — XEVKotTTitpitg 
cX^vffa vXa^ovc — e*:£ri;c, UiTig TrpocrfjXdey a/3Xa/3//c 
Cofioig — (pwTLjy ddXiu/y iVri/pta — iKKTiovr 7r£/i7rw 
XiTiig. 

Swearing. BpKoy avyd\l/ai — (rvYxicn- — efxm^iUffai — 
Karofiotrai Kapa Tiyog — opKoig Kft:Xrj<rdai — opKoig 



-■wajfesiSw 



iiMaal 



■JtS:?x 



■ i'i" 



m >,r 






164 EXERCISES IN THE COMrOSITION, ETC. 

£ vut^oTOQ — opKiofja — vpKOJfjiOTeiy — opKiOQ Xe y w — Zijva 
?.* opKioy KuXd — opKOV ai/rw irporrliaXoji — opKOV^ iiq 
v^ii)p ypd<p(t) — ofiUjfioraL fiiyaq opKog — optcoQ kfifiivti 
TTiaTtjjfjiacri — aptaya rqQ hiKtic 6p»ja»/iaTa — ^ f^*l^y form 
by which an oath is introduced. 

Tears, hitcpv — ^ut^pvov (rare) — ZaKpxa — kut* orrrrufv 
opfidrni — ^ak'pva trra\u<T(T£tt' — riyyiiy vpotrwiroy 
^.aKpvuty (TroXuyyuatTt, 'ir\r}fiij.vpwi — 6\l/iy tTrXiyrra 
CaKpvtov — yorti^eiy l3\i<papa — (itt' Ofi^aruty /SaXiIi' 
t. — Kari\£iy Trrjya^ ^aKpvu}y — riyyeiv K6(mQ, vypai- 
vtty l^\i(f>apa, ^K'Tt'iKeiy xpoa, ?o»:pu<T(, 6(pda\^oTlyKrM 
TrXTj^fivpi^i — Cakpvppoiiy — d/i/icirwr Tnk'pa cporroQ — 
o<T(ToiQ 6^i\\ri TTpotrrjlE — tppuyi T»yy>/ cakpvtor — 
Hipfia I'o/iara, axyfj ("aicpvuty. 

War. "Apiycj tpyoy ky KvfioiQ Kpiyit — yprffinrtay kukoq 
carrfTHc — fiiyay Ik dvfiov K\u^oyreQ "Apij — XeoyTuty 
" Aptf CidopKt'jTu}y—^ Aprj^ "^pvaafiOiftoQ trMf.iaTtM>y — 
avyytyifij oiKuog — uXXorpw^ — avyaTTTny Apr) — 
TToXifiw^ KXvOioy — TToXtfiiiuy ayutyia — ipv^a iroXefiiac 
\(^poQ — iroXefiia erKvXivfxara — voXifjitaQ cV* affTricoQ — 
dvpalog lOTtt) TToXifiOQ — woXifjiwy tTriynv Z6pv» See 
also Fight <kc. 

Wind. uyifiog — nnvfia — Tyo)) — ar}^a — TryevintTioy 
uiifjiaTa — ayipLOv duiXXai — evaeli iri oat — ra)(V7rrepot 
iryoai — nyev^uTioy citlocoi — iritvfia roi»v -irpwpac — 
ovpia iryoi] — ravra pitTU) Kar ovpov — 'truf t:ar ovpov 
— fiiyeiy frpvfiyrjdey ovpoy — (also metaph.) Trrtvfia 
(Tvfjtftopag — &'"»?C OveXXa — ovpoc Tifj^tjQ. 



Spottuuvode dr Co., Printert, Aete-ifrett Squnre, London 



May 1879. 



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HOMER'S IIiIAD— THE STORY OF ACHILLES. Edited 
by the late J. H. Pratt, M.A., and Walter Leaf, M.A., 
Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. 

HOMER'S ODYSBSY-Books XXI-XXIV. Edited by S. G. 
HamiltOxN, B.A., Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford. 

LIVY— Book* XXIII. and XXIV. Edited by Rev. W. W. 
Capes, M.A. 

LYSIAS— SELECT ORATIONS. Edited by E. S. ShUCK- 
BURGH, M.A., Assistant-Master at Eton College. 

MARTIAL— SELECT EPIGRAMS. Edited by Rev. H. M. 
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York. 

OVID— SELECT EPISTLES. Felted by E. S. Shuckburgh, 
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OVID-PASTI. Edited by G. H. Hallam, M.A., Fellow of 
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PLATO — POUR DIALOGUES ON THE TRIAL AND 
DEATH of SOCRATES, w«., EUTHYPHRO^ APO- 
LOGY, CRITO, AND PHJEDO. Edited byC. W. Moule, 
M.A., Fellow and Tutor of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. 

PROP ERTIUS— SELECT POEMS. Edited by J. P. PoST- 
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TERENCE— PHORMio. Edited by Rev. John Bond, M.A., 
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POLE, late Scholar of Worcester College, Oxford. 

THUCYDIDES— Books I. and II. Edited by H. Broadbent, 
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Master at Eton College. 

THUCYDIDES— Books Iv. and V. Fxlitcd by Rev. C. 
E. Gravrs, M.A., Classical Lecturer, and late Fellow of 
St. John's College, Cambridge. 

XENOPHON-MEMORABILIA. Edited ])y A. R. Cluer, B.A. 
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CJLASSICAL. 

JBSCHYLUS— r^^ EUMENIDES. The Greek Text, with 
Introduction, English Notes, and Verse Translation. By 
Bernard Drake, M.A., late Fellow of King's College, 
Cambridge. 8vo. 31. td, 

ARISTOTLE— ^AT INTRODUCTION TO ARISTOTLES 
RHETORIC. With Analysis, Notes and Appendices. By 
E. M. Cope, Fellow and Tutor of Trinity College, Cambridge, 
Svow 141. 

ARISTOTLE ON FALLACIES', OR, THE SOPHISTICI 
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FeUow of Oriel CoUege, Oxford. 8vo. %s. td. 

ARISTOTRAUBS— THE BIRDS, Translated into English 
Verse, with Introduction, Notes, and Appendices, by B. H. 
Kennedy, D.D., Regius Professor of Greek in the University 
of Cambridge. Crown 8vo. dr. Help-Notes to the same, 
for the use of Students, is, 6J. 

BBhCHBK— SHORT EXERCISES IN LATIN PROSE 
COMPOSITION AND EXAMINATION PAPERS IN 
LATIN GRAMMAR, to which is prefixed a Chapter on 
Analysis of Sentences. By the Rev. H. Belcher, M.A., 
Assistant Master in King's College School, London. New 
Edition. i8mo. is. 6d, Key, is. &d. 

SEQUEL TO THE ABOVE. EXERCISES IN LA TIN 
IDIOMS, ifc. By the same author. [In May. 

BIaACKII^—GREEX and ENGLISH DIALOGUES FOR 
USE IN SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. By John 
Stuart Blackie, Professor of Greek in the University of 
Edinburgh. New Edition. Fcap. 8vo. zr. 6d, 

CICERO— 77/^ ACADEMICA, The Text revised and explained 
by James Reid, M.A., Fellow of Caius College, Cambridge. 
New Edition. With Translation. 8vo. [In October, 

SELECT LETTERS.'-AiXcr the Edition of Albert 
Watson, M.A. Translated by G. E. Jeans, M.A., Fellow 
of Hertford College, Oxford, and Assistant-Master at Hailey 
bury. 8vo. [In October. 



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CU^SSICAL WTtiTERS. Edited by J. R- Grrkn, M.A. 

Fcap. 8vo. IX. 6d. each. 
A Series of small volumes>pon some of the principal classical 
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The main object of the Series is Educational, care being taken 
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CICERO, By Professor'A. S. WiLKlNS. 
DEMOSTHENES. By S. H. Butcher, M.A. 
E URIPIDES. By Professor J. P. Mahaffy. 
HORACE, ByT. H. Ward, M.A. 
LIVY. By Rev. W. W. Capes, M.A. 
VERGIL, By Professor II. Nkitleshif. 

Others to folltnv. 



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Ol*ADSTONB— Works by the Rt Hon. W. E. Gladstone, M.P. 
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AN ELEMENTAR Y GREEK GRAMMAR. New Edition, 
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HERODOTUS, Books \,—\\\.^THE EMPIRES OF THE 
EAST, Edited, with Notes and Introductions, by A. H 
Sayce, M.A., Fellow and Tutor of Queen's College, Oxford, 
and Deputy -Professor of Comparative Philology. 8vo. 

[In preparation, 
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Crown 8vo. [In preparation, 

noUQSOlf -MYTHOLOGY FOR LATIN VERSIFICA' 
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UOMHU—THE ODYSSEY, Done into EngUsh by S. H. 
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HOZKIEIUG DZCTZONAR'S'. For Use in Schools and Colleges. 
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THE ODES OF HORACE IN A METRICAL PARA- 
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HO RACERS LIFE AND CHARACTER. An Epitome of 
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WORD FOR WORD FROM HORACE, The Odes lite- 
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JACKSON-Ziye^r ^T'iS/'i: TO GREEK PROSE COM- 
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revised and enlarged. i8mo. is. 6d, 

JACKSON—^ MANUAL OF GREEK PHILOSOPHY. Bf 
Henry Jackson, M.A., Fellow and Praelector In Ancient 
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JEBB— Works by R. C. JEBB, M.A., Professor of Greek in the 
University of Glasgow. 

THE ATTIC ORATORS FROM ANTIPHON TO 
ISAEOS. 2 vols. 8va 25^. 

SELECTIONS FROM THE A TTIC OR A TORS BEFORE 
DEMOSTHENES. Edited, with English Notes. Being a 
companion volume to the preceding work. 8vo. {In October. 
THE CHARACTERS OF THEOPHRASTUS. Translated 
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8vo. ti. bd, 
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A HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE. Crown 8vo. 

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jxrVTifilLl.— THIRTEEN SATIRES OF JUVENAL. With 
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enlarged. Crown 8vo. ^s. 6d. Vol. IL Crown Svo. lOs.dJ. 

KlIiP^RT— CLASS-BOOK OF ANCIENT GEOGRAPHY, 
Translated from the German of Dr. Hbinrich Kiepert. 

[In preparation, 

KYmLSrOK—GREEK IAMBICS FOR SCHOOLS. By Rev. 
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[In /Separatum, 

LIVY, Books XXI.— XXV. Translated by A. J. Chxtrch, 
M.A., and W. J. Brodribb, M.A. [In preparation, 

IsUOYO— THE AGE OF PERICLES. A History of the 
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KACMlI^ueLVi— FIRST LATIN GRAMMAR. By M. C. 
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Assistant Master in St. Paul's School l8mo. [In preparation. 

MAHAFFY— Works by J. P. MAHAFFY, M.A., Professor of 
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SOCIAL LIFE IN GREECE; from Homer to Menander. 
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RAMBLES AND STUDIES IN GREECE, With 
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EURIPIDES. i8mo. is.td. 

MARSHALL — ^ TABLE OF IRREGULAR GREEK 
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MAYOR (JOHN B. B.)— FIRST GREEK READER. Edited 
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BIBLIOGRAPHICAL CLUE TO LATIN LITERA- 
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MAYOR (JOSEPH B.)^GREEK FOR BEGINNERS. By 
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miLOV^PARALLEL EXTRACTS arranged for translation 
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Part I. — Historical and Epistolary. New Edition, revised 
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Tables and Illustrations. By J. E. Nixon, M.A. 
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VlsATO—THE REPUBLIC OF PLATO. Tranalalcd into 
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PHILEBUS. Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by 
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VLJl\TT\3M—TIIE MOSTELLARIA of PLAUTUS. With 
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SHUCKBURGH—y^ LATIN READER. By E. S. Shuck. 
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THRINGh— WorU by the Rev. E. THRING, M.A., Head 

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A MANUAL OF MOOD CONSTRUCTIONS. Fcap. 
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WILKINS— ^ PRIMER OF ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. By 
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WRIGHT— Works by J. WRIGHT, M.A., laic Head Master of 
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SOLID GEOMETRY AND CONIC SECTIONS, With 
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26 MACMILLAN'S EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE. 



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28 MACMILLAN'S EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE. 



BLBMENTARY OIaABS-BOOKB ConH nU i d 

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ELEMENTARY CLASS-BOOKS Continued— 

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Others tn Preparation, 






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Vines, B.Sc, Fellow and Lecturer of Christ's Collt^e, 
Cambridge. With numerous Illustrations. [/« preparaiioiu. 

PAWCETT— ^ MANUAL OF POLITICAL ECONOMY. 
By Trofessor Fawcett, M.?. New Edition, revised and 
cnlai-gcd. Crown Svo. I2J. 6j. 

FLEISCHER--^ SYSTEM OF VOLUMETRIC ANALY- 
SIS. Translated, with Notes and Additions, from the second 
German Edition, by M. M. Pattison MuiR, F.R.S.E, With 
Illustrations. Crown Svo. ^s, 6d, 

FLOWER (W. VL^i'-AN INTRODUCTION TO THE OSTE- 
OLOGY OF THE MAMMALIA. Being the substance of 
the Course of Lectures delivered at the Royal College of 
Surgeons of England in 1870. By Professor W. H. Flower, 
F.R.S., F.R.C.S. With numerous Illustrations. New Edition, 
enlarged. Crown Svo. los. td. 

FOSTER and BAImTQVU^ THE ELEMENTS OE EMBRYO- 
LOGY. By Michael Foster, M.D., F.R.S., and F. M. 
Balfour, M.A. Part I. crown Svo. 7j. OJ. 

FOSTER and LAN OLE Y—^ COURSE OF ELEMENTARY 
PRACTICAL PHYSIOLOGY. By Michael Foster, 
M.D., F.R.S., and J. N. Langley, B.A. New Edition. 
Crown Sva 6/. 

HOOKER (I>T.)—THE STUDENTS FLORA OF THE 
BRITISH ISLANDS. By Sir J. D. Hooker, K.C.S.L, 
C.R, F.R.S., M.D., D.C.L. New Edition, re\iscd. Globe 
Svo. 10^. 6tf. 



MANUALS FOR STUDENTS Continued— 

nVJi'LEY— PHYSIOGRAPHY. An Introduction to the Study ol 
Nature. By Professor Huxley, F.R.S. With numerous Illus- 
trations, and Coloured Plates. New Edition. Crown Svo. *js.(>d. 

HUXLEY and MARTIN—^ COURSE Oh PRACTICAL 
INSTRUCTION IN ELEMENTARY BIOLOGY. By 
Professor Huxley, F.R.S., assisted by H. N. Martin, M.B., 
D.Sc. New Edition, revised. Crown Svo. 6j. 

HUXLEY and VhSil^T.'^— ELEMENTARY BIOLOGY. 

PARI 12. By Professor Huxley, F.R.S., assisted by 

— Parker. With Illustrations. [Jnfreparaiion. 

JBVONS— 77/^ PRINCIPLES OF SCIENCE. A Treatise 
on Logic and Scientific Method. By Professor W. Stanley 
Jevons, LL.D., F.R.S. New and Revised Edition. Crown 
Svo. 12S. 6d, 

Ol.iyfJlVi{VToU%uoT)— FIRST BOOK OFINDIAN BOTANY. 
By Professor Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., F.L.S., Keeper of 
the Herbarium and Library of the Royal Gardens, Kcw, 
With numerous Illustrations. Extra fcap. Svo. 6s. 6d. 

PARKER and BETTANY-r^^ MORPHOLOGY OF 
THE SKULL. By Professor Parker and G. T. Bettany. 
Illustrated. Crown Svo. lOi. 6^. 

'IKVZ—AN ELEMENTARY TREATISE ON HEAT By 
Professor Tait, F. R. S. E. Illustrated. \In the press. 

TUOVisoti— ZOOLOGY, By Sir C. Wyville Thomson, F.R.S. 
UlusUated. [^« preparation. 

TYLOR and i.iJAYLJ:.S'i^'&- ANTHROPOLOGY. By E. B. 
Tylor, M.A., F.R.S., and Professor E. Ray Lankester, 
M.A., F.R.S. lUustratcd. \In preparaiian. 

Other volumd of these Manuals will follow. 






#li^lii^^#|^ii|^«#^|j#i^^^l 










■-■..^*-;. 









^%^ 



Ji*-' 



|tl"Qj^jg>»i«»-A 



.'St*! 



^iK-^>J";$j 



32 MACMILLAN'S EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE. 



SCIENCE. 



33 



SCIENTIFIC TEXT.BOOKS. 

BALL (R. 8., K.lfL.)— EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS. A 
Course of Lectures delivered at the Royal College of Sdenc« 
for Ireland. By R. S. Ball, A.M., Professor of Applied 
Mathematics and Mechanics in the Royal College of Science 
for Ireland. Royal 8vo. idr. 

rOBTBB— ^ TEXT 'BOOK OF PHYSIOLOGY. By Michael 
Foster, M.D., F.R.S. With Illustrations. New Edition, 
enlarged, with additional Illustrations. 8vo. 21/. 

OAMGEE —A TEXTBOOK, SYSTEMATIC AND PRAC- 
TICAL, OF THE PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY OF 
THE ANIMAL BODY. Including the changes which the 
Tissues and Fluids undergo in Disease. By A. Gamgke, 
M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Physiology, Owens College, 
Manchester. 8vo. \Ih tfu pras. 

G-ROTLn-RAXiB,— ELEMENTS OF COMPARATIVE ANA- 
TOMY. By Professor Carl Gegenbaur. A Translation by 
F. Jeffrey Bell, B.A. Revised with Preface by Professor 
E. Ray Lankester, F.R.S. With numerous Illustrations. 
Svo. 21S. 

KU^VSlva— MECHANICAL THEORY OF HEA T. Trans- 
lated by Walter K. Browne. Svo. [/« the press. 

K'EWCOMB— POPULAR ASTRONOMY. By S. Newcomb, 
LL.D., Professor U.S. Naval Observatory. With 112 Illus- 
trations and 5 Maps of the Stars. Svo. iSr. 

** It is unlike aDything else of its kiad, and will be of more u«e in circulatine 
a knowledge of astronomy than nine-tenths of tlie books which have appeared 
on the .•mbject of late yean. *'-~Saturdmf Jimru. . 

RBULEAUX — 7W:£ KINEMATICS OF MACHINERY, 
Outlines of a Theory of Machines. By Professor F. Reuleaux. 
Translated and Edited by Professor A. B. W. Kennedy, 
C.E. With 450 Illustrations. Medium Svo. 21/, 



BCIENTIFIO TEXT-BOORS Conttnued— 

ROSCOEand BCUO'Rl.^viffl'B.B.— CHEMISTRY, A Complete 
Trcause on. By Professor H. E. Roscoe, F.R.S., and Pro- 
fessor C. Schorlemmer, F.R.S. Medium Svo. Vol. I.— 
The Non-Metallic Elements. With numerous Illustrations, and 
Portrait of Dalton. 21s. Vol. II.— Metals. Part I. lUus- 
trated. 18/. {Vol. II.^Metals. Part II. in the press. 

SCHORLEMMER—^ MANUAL OF THE CHEMISTRY OF 
THE CARBON COMPOUNDS, OR ORGANIC CHE- 
MISTRY. By C. Schorlemmer, F.R.S. , Professor of 
Chemistry, Owens College, Manchester. With Illustrations. 
Svo. 14/. 

NATURE SERIES. 

THE SPECTROSCOPE AND ITS APPLICATIONS. By 
J. Norman Lockyer, F.R.S. With Coloured Plate and 
numerous Illustrations. Second Edition. Crown Svo. y. 6d. 

THE ORIGIN AND METAMORPHOSES OF INSECTS. 
By Sir John Lubbock, M.P., F.R.S., D.C.L. With nume- 
rous Illustrations. Second Edition. Crown Svo. 3/. 6c/. 

THE TRANSIT OF VENUS. By G. Forbes, M.A., Pro- 
fessor of Natural Philosophy in the Andersonian University, 
Glasgow. Illustrated. Crown Svo. 3^. 6d. 

THE COMMON FROG. By St. George Mivart, F.R.S., 
Lecturer in Comparative Anatomy at St. Mary's Hospital. 
With numerous Illustrations. CrouTi Svo. y. 6d. 

POLARISATION OF LIGHT. By W. Spottiswoode, F.R.S. 

With many Illustrations. Second Edition. Crown Svo. 

3/. ()d. 
ON BRITISH WILD FLOWERS CONSIDERED IN RE- 

LATION TO INSECTS. By Sir John Lubbock, M.P., 

F.R.S. With numerous Illustrations. Second Edition. Crown 

Svo. 4r. 6(/. 
THE SCIENCE OF WEIGHING AND MEASURING, AND 

THE STANDARDS OF MEASURE AND WEIGHT. 

By H. W. Chisholm, Warden of the Standards. Witt 

numerous Illustrations. Crown Svo. 4^. 6(/. 

C 
















"S."-*. '-*''-' 






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34 



MACMILLAN'S EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE. 



SCIENCE. 



35 



NATURE SERIES Continutd— 

HOW TO DRAW A STRAIGHT LINE : a Lecture on Link- 
ages. By A. B. Kbmpe. With lUustrations. Crown 8vo. u. W. 

LIGHT: a Series of Simple, entertaining, and Inexpensive Expe- 
riments in Uie Phenomena of Light, for the Use of StudenU of 
every age. By A. M. Mayer and C. Barnard. Crown 8vo, 
with numerous Illustrations. 2s, 6d, 

SOUND : a Scries of Simple, Entertaining, and Inexpensive Ex- 
periments in the Phenomena of Sound, for the use of Students 
oi every age. By A. M. Mayer, Professor of Physics in 
the Stevens Institute of Technology, &c. With numerous 
Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 3^. 6d. 

Othir volumes to follow. 



EASY LESSONS IN SCIENCE. 

HEAT. By Miss C. A. Martinrau. Edited by Prof. W. F. 
Barrett. [In the press. 

LIGHT. By Mrs. Awdry. Edited by ProL W. F. Barrett. 

[In the press. 

ELECTRICITY. By Prof. W. F. Barrett. [In preparation. 



SCIENCE LECTURES AT SOUTH 
KENSINGTON. 

VOL. I. Containing Lectures by Capt. Abney, Prof. Stokes, 
Prof. Kennedy, F. G. Bramwelt., Prof. G. Forbes, H. C. 
SoRBY, J. T. Bottom LEY, S. H. Vines, and Prof. Carey 
Foster. Crown Svo. dr. 

VOL. II. Containing Lectures by W. Spottiswoode, P.R.S., 
Prof. Forbes, Prof. Pigot, Prof. Barrett, Dr. Burdon- 
Sanderson, Dr. Lauder Brunton, F.R.S., Prof. Roscoe, 
and others. Crown Svo. 6s. 



MANCHESTER SCIENCE LECTURES 
FOR THE PEOPLE. 

Eighth Series, 1876-7. Crown Svo. Illustrated. 6d. each. 
WHAT THE EARTH IS COMPOSED OF. By Professor 
Roscoe, F.R.S. 

THE SUCCESSION OF LIFE ON THE EARTH. By 
Professor Williamson, F.R.S. 

WHY THE EARTHS CHEMISTRY IS AS IT IS. By 
J. N. Lockykr, F.R.S. 
AUo completa in One Volume. Crown Svo. doth. 2J. 

BLANPORD— Ti^i? RUDIMENTS OF PHYSICAL GEO- 
GRAPHY FOR THE USE OF INDIAN SCHOOLS; with 
a Glossary of Technical Terms employed. By H. F. Blan ford, 
F.R.S. New Edition, with Illustrations. Globe Svo. 2s. (xi, 

HV^HBTT— PHYSICAL UNITS. By Prof. J. D. EvERErr. 
Extra fcap. Svo. [In the press. 

QJ^lfLl-R— OUTLINES OF FIELD GEOLOGY. By Prof. 
GWKIE, F.R.S. With Illustrations. Extra f cap. Svo. 3J. 6</. 

aORDON^^A^ ELEMENTARY BOOK ON HEAT. By 
J. E. H. Gordon, B.A., Gonvlllc and Cains College, Cam. 
bridge. Crown Svo. 2s. 

M'K^VHRICK— OUTLINES OF PHYSIOLOGY IN ITS 
RELATIONS TO MAN. By J. G. M'Kendrick, M.D., 
F.R.S.E. With Illustrations. Crown Svo. 12s. 6^. 

MIAU^— STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE ANATOMY. 

No. I.— The SlcuU of the Crocodile : a Manual for Students. 
By L. C. Ml ALL, Professor of Biology in the Yorkshire College 
and Curator of tJie Leeds Museum. Svo. 2s. 6d. 
No. IL— Anatomy of the Indian Elephant. By L. C. MiALL 
and F. Greenwood. With Illustration*. Svo. 51. 

MXJin— PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY FOR MEDICAL STU- 
DENTS. Specially arranged for the first M.B. Course. By 
M. M. Pattison Muir, F.R.S.E. Fcap. Svo. \s. (>d. 

•HANN— ^A^ ELEMENTARY TREA TISE ON HE A T, IN 
RELATION TO STEAM AND THE STEAM-ENGINE. 
By G. Shann, M.A. With Illustrations. Crown Svo. ^. Cxi. 

C 2 



5.--, 






36 MACMILLAN'S EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE. 



HISTORY, 



37 



WRlGHT-AfETALSAATD THEIR CHIEF ISDUSIRIAL 
APPLICATIONS. By C. Alder Wright, D.Sc, &c 
Lecturer on Chemistry in Su Mary's Hospital Medical School. 
Extra fcap. 8vo. 3^.61/. . ^ 

HISTORY. 

BJ^l^Sl.-i-STORIES FROM THE HISTORY OF ROME, 
By Mrs. liEfcSLY. Fcap. Svo. 2s, 6<i. 

" The Rttempt Rniwarj to us in every w.ny succeftsful, Th« itorie« are 
inttr^sLT^n^hJlwc., and arc tuld wiili perfect suupUcity and good 
feeling."— Daily Nbws. 

FREEMAN (EDWARD A,)^OLD^ENGLISH HISTORY. 
By Edward A. Freeman, DX.L., LL.D., late FcUow of 
Trinity College, Oxford. With Five Coloured [Maps. New 
Edition. Extra fcap. Svo. half-bound. 6j. 

ORBEN-^ SHORT HISTORY OF ™^ J^^^(^^. 
PEOPLE By John Richard Green, M.A., LL,1J. ^vlln 
Coloured Maps, Genealogical Tables, and Chronological 
Annals. Crown Svo. 8i. 6^. Sixty-second Thousand. 

••Sunds alone as die one general history <>fj[;V°";:Sui"and'«J^^^^ 
of which ali others, if young and old are wise. wUl be spwxiily and wreiy 

set aside."— Academy. 
QVMT-LECTC/RES ON- THE HISTORY OI' ENGLAND. 

By M. J. Guest. With Maps. Crown Svo. 6i. 
HI8TORICAI. COURSE FOR SCHOOLS -Edited by 

EDWARD A. FREEMAN, D.CL.. late FeUow of Trmity 

College, Oxford. 

I GENERAL SKETCH OF EUROPEAN HISTORY. 

By EDWARD A. FREKMAN, D.CL. New Edition. ««sed 
and enlarged, »-ith Chronological Table. Maps, and Index. 

iSmo. cloth. V. 6^. . . . , . . 

*** . D- „. «.„.«! .ffoodfoundauon for hiitoncalteachmc. 

Educational Timbs. 

II HISTORY OF ENGLAND. By Edith Thompson. 

N^w EdiUon, revised and enlarged, witK Maps. iSmo. 2J. 6d. 

in. HISTORY OF SCOTLAND. By Margaret 

Macarthur. New Edition. iSmo. 2/. 

"An excellent summag. ummpeachable as ;<;/S*^";^"J^P;;;f°« "^^ 
in the dearest and mosn&partial l.ght attainable. -Ouardiah. 



HISTORICAL COURSE FOR SCHOOLS Continued— 

IV. HISTORY OF ITALY. By the Rev. W. Hunt, M.A. 
iSmo. jj. 

" It possesses the same solid merit as its prcdeccs.«ors .... the same 
•CTupulous care about fidelity in details. . . . his disUngiushcd. too, by 
information on art, architecture, and social politics, in which the writer s 

frasp IS seen by the firmness and clearness of his touch"— Educational 
IMBS. 

V. HISTORY OF GERMANY. By J. Sime, M.A. 
iSmo. 3x. 

•*A remarkably clear'and impressi^-e history of Germany. Its great 
events are wisely kept as central figures, and the smaller events arc care- 
fully kept, not only subordinate and subserrient, but most skilfully woven 
into the texture of the historical upcstry presented to the eyo."— 
Standakx). 

VL HISTORY OF AMERICA. By John A. Doyle. 
With Maps. iSmo. 41. 6a, 

" Mr. Doyle has performed hb ta«Oc with admirable care, fulnes-v and 
cleameas, and for the first time we have for schools an accurate and inter- 
esting history of America, from the earliest to the present time."— 
Standard. 

EC/ROPEAN COLONIES. By E. J. Payne, M. A. With 

Maps. iSmo. 41. 6d. 

"We have seldom inet with an historian capable of forming a more 
comprehensive, iar-seeing, and unprejudiced estimate of events and 
peoples, and we can commend this little wcrk as one certain to prove o£ 
the highest bterest to all thoughtful readers."— Timbs. 

FRANCE. By Charlotte M. Yonge. With M.ips. iSmo. 

3J. 6^. 

GREECE. By Edward A. Freeman, D.CL. ! 

[In freparafion. 
ROME. By Edward A. Freeman, D.CL. {^In preparation. 

HISTORY PRIMERS— Edited by John Richard Green. 
Author of " A Short History of the English People." 

ROME. By the Rev. M. Creighton, M.A., late Fellow 
and Tutor of Merton College, Oxford. With Eleven Maps. 
iSmo. I J. 

"The author has been curiously successful in telling in an intelli- 

Sent way the story of Rome from first to last." — School Board 
Ihkoniclb. 

GREECE. By C. A. Fyffe, M.A., Fellow and late Tutor 

of University College, Oxford. With Five Maps. iSmo. \s. 

" We give our unqualified praise to tliis little manual."— School- 

MASTBB. 






r.?''...r. 



M 






|8 MACMILLAN'S EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE. 



HISTORY PRIMERS Ocntmuid-^ 

EUROPEAN HISTORY. By E. A. Freeman, D.C.L., 
LL.D. With Maps. i8mo. is, 

"The work U always cXtzr^ and forms a luminoui key to European 
htstory.''->ScMOOL Ik>ARD Chsomiclx. 

GREEK ANIIQUITIES. By the Rev. J. P. Mahaffy, 
M.A. Illustrated. i8mo. U, 

*' All that is necessary for the scholar to know is told so compactly yet 
so fully, aad in a style so intercstiiig, that it is impossible for even the 
dullest boy to look on this little work in the same light as he regards his 
other school books." — Schoolmastbr. 

CLASSICAL CEOCRAPIIY, By IL^F. Tozer, M.A. 
iSmo. IX. 

^'Another valuable aid to the study of the ancient world. ... It 
contains an enormous quantity of infonaation packed into a siuall toace, 
and at the samt time communicated in a %'ery readable shape."— JoiUi 
Buti. 

GEOGRAPHY, By George Grove, D.C.L. With Maps. 

x8mo. I/. 

"A model of what such a work should ba .... we know of no short 
treatise better suited to infuse life and spirit into the dull li:>ts of proper 
names of which our onlioary class-books so often almost exclusively 
consist. **— TiMJSS. 

ROMAN ANTIQUITIES, By Professor Wilkins. Ulus- 

trated. iSzno. i/. 

•• A little book that throws a blase of Kghi on Roman History, and 
is, moreover^ iateiuMly '\n\.KrtiXmg."— School Board Ckrvnuit, 

FRANCE. By Cuaklqttk M. Yonok. iSmo. is. 

In preparation : — , 

ENGLAND. By T. R. Green, M.A. 

MICHE1.ET— -4 SUMMARY OF MODERN HISTORY. 

Traii^ted from tlie French of M. Michelet, and continued 
to the Present T^nie, by M. C. M. SiMPSON. Globe 8vo. 
4r. 6(/. 

KfVTt— SCANDINAVIAN HISTQEY* By E. C. Orri. 
With Maps. Globe Svo. 6/. 

VAVIA— PICTURES OF OLD ENGLAND. By Dr. R. 
Pauu. Translated with the sanction of the Author by 
E. C. Orri. Cheaper Edition. Crown Svo. 6s, 



lU 



, f- » • 



DIVINITY. 



39 



TA1T--ANALYSIS OF ENGLISH HISTORY, based on 
Grecn'i "Short History of the English People." By C. W. A. 
Tait, M.A., Assistant Master, Clifton CoU^e. Crown Svo. 



i—A HISTORY OF INDIA, By J. Talboys 
Wheeler. Crown Svo. [In tki press. 

YONOE {cnAni.OTTB M.) -A PARALLEL HIS TOR} OF 
FRANCE AND ENGLAND : consisting of Oudines and 
Dotes. By Charlotte M. Yonge, Author of "The Heir 
of Redclyffe," &c., &c Oblong 4to. y. ed, 

CAMEOS FROM ENGLISH HIS7VRY. —YKOM 
ROLLO TO EDWARD II. By the Author of *' The Heir 
of Redclyffe." Extra fcap. Svo. New Edition. 5/. 

A SECOND SERIES OF CAMEOS FROM ENGLISH 
HISTORY— THE WARS IN FRANCE. New Edition. 
Extra fcap. Svo. $s. 

A THIRD SERIES OF CAMEOS FROM ENGLISH 
HISTORY— TWE WARS OF THE ROSES. New Edition. 
Extra fcap. Svo. 5/. 

A FOURTH SERIES. {In iht press. 

EUROPEAN HISTORY. Narrated in a Series of 
. Historical Selections from the Best Authorities. Edited and 
arranged by E. M. Sewkll and C. M. Yonge. First Series, 
1003 — 1 1 54. Third Edition. Crown Svo. 6/. Second 
Series, 1088— 1228. New Edition. Crown Svo. 6s, 



tolVINITY. 

%♦ For other Works by these Authors, see Theological 

Catalogue. a 

ABBOTT (REV. B. A.)— BIBLE LESSONS. By the Rev. 
E. A. Abbott, D.D., Head Master of the City of London 
School New Edition. Crown Svo. 41. 6d. 

" Wise, suggestive, and really profound initiation into religious thoughL " 

— <}UAai>IAN. 






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ARNOX.D— yf BIBLE-READING FOR SCHOOLS^IHZ 
GREAT PROPHECY OF ISRAEL'S RESTORATION 
(Isaiah, Chapters xl. — Ixvi.). Arranged and Edited for Young 
Learners. By Matthew Arnold, D.C.L., formerly 
Professor of Poetry in the University of Oxford, and Fellow 
of OrieL New Edition. i8mo. cloth, is. 

ISAIAH XL.—LXVL With the Shorter Prophecies aUied 
to it Arranged and Edited, with Notes, by Matthew 
Arnold. Crown 8vo. 5j. 

GOLDEN TRBA8URY PSAIiTCR— Students' Edition. Being 
an Edition of "The Psalms Chronologically Arranged, by 
Four Friends," with briefer Notes. l8mo. y. dd, 

GREEK TESTAMENT. Edited, with Introduction and Appen- 
dices, by Canon Westcott and Dr. F. J. A. Hort. Two 
Vols. Crown 8vo. {In the press, 

HARD^VI OK— Works by Archdeacon Hardwick. 

A HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Middle Age. From Gregory the Great to the Excommuni- 
cation of Luther. Edited by William Stubbs, M.A., Regius 
Piofessor of Modem History in the University of Oxford. 
With Four Maps constructed for this work by A. Keith John- 
ston. Fourth Edition. Cnnvn 8vo. lo/. 6</. 

A IIISTOR Y OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH DURING 
THE REFORM A TION. Fourth Edition. Edited by Pro- 
fessor Stubbs. Crown 8vo. \os. 6d. 

Kiua-CHURCH HISTORY OF IRELAND. By the Rev. 
Robert King. New Edition. 2 vols. Crown 8vo. 

[/« preparaHon. 

KACLKAR— Works by the Rev. G. F. Macleas, D.D^ Head 
Master of King's College School. 

A CLASS-BOOK OF OLD TESTAMENT HISTOJ^Xt 
New Edition, with Four Maps. i8mo. 41. 6d. 

A CLASS-BOOK OF NEW TESTAMENT HISTORY, 
including the Connection of tlie Old and New Testament 
W^ith Four Maps. New Edition. i8mo. 5j, 6a, 



'-*.4it:. 



DIVINITY. 



41 



MACLEAR ConHnued— 

A SHILLING BOOK OF OLD TESTAMENl 
HISTORY, for National and Elementary Schools. With 
Map. x8ma cloth. New Edition. 

A SHILLING BOOK OF NEW TESTAMENT 
HISTORY, for National and Elementary Schools. With 
Map. i8mo. cloth. New Edition. 

These works have be^ carefully abridged from the author's 
larger manuals. 

CLASS-BOOK OP 7 HE CATECHISM OF THE 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND. New Edition. i8mo. doth. 
IX. 6^. 

A FIRST CLASS-BOOK OF THE CATECHISM OF 
THE CHURCH 01 ENGLAND, with Scripture Proofs, 
for Junior Classes and Schools. i8mo. 6d. New Edition. 

A MANUAL OF INSTRUCTION FOR CONFIRMA- 
TION AND FIRST COMMUNION. WITH PR A YERS 
AND DEVOTIONS, 32mo. cloth extra, red edges. 2s. 

MCImHIsIaAH— THE NEW TESTAMENT. A New Trans- 
lation on the Basis of the Authorised Version, from a Critically 
revised Greek Text, with Analyses, copious References and 
Illustrations from original authorities. New Chronological 
and Analytical Harmony of the Four Gospels, Notes and Dis- 
sertations. A contribution to Christian 'Evidence. By John 
Brown M'Clellan, M.A., late Fellow of Trinity College, 
Cambridge. In Two Vols Vol. I.— The Four Gospels with 
the Chronological and Analytical Harmony. 8vo. 3ar. 

"One of the moat remarVable productions of recent timK,''say« the 
Theolceical Rrtnnv, " in this department of sacred hterature ; and the 
British Quarterly Rex'ie^ l«rms it " a thesaunis of first-hand investiga- 
tions." 

MAURICE- Ti^-^ LORD'S PRAYER, THE CREED, AND 
THE COMMANDMENTS. Manual for Parents and School- 
masters. To which ia added the Order of the Scriptures. By the 
Rev. F. Dknison Maurice, M.A. i8mo. clotli, limp. is. 



42 MACMILLAN'S EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



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PROCTER— /< HISTORY OF THE BOOK OF COMMON 
K PRAYER^ with a RAdonale of its Offices. By Francis 
Proctkr, M.A, Thirteenth Edition, revised and enlarged. 
Crown 8va iQf. 6*/. 

ROCTBR AND V.AOl^niLU'-AN ELEMENTARY JNTRO- 
DUCTION TO THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER, 
Re-airanged and supplemented by an Explanation of the 
Morning and Evening Prayer and the Litany. By the 
: Rev. F. Proctkr and the Rov. Dr. Maclear. New 
and Enlarged Edition, containing the Communion Service and 
the Confirmation and Baptismal Offices. i8mo. 2s, td» 

PSALMS OF DAVID CHRONOI.OGIOALLY ARRANGED. 
By Fonr Friends. An Amended Version, with Historical 
Introduction and Explanatory Notes. Second and Cheaper 
Edition, with Additions and Corrections. Cr. 8vo. Sj*. (>d, 

BJLMSAV-^THE CA TECHISER^S MANUAL ; or, the Church 
Catechism Illustrated and Explained, for the Use of Clergy- 
men, Schoolmasters, and Teachers. By the Rev. Arthur 
Ramsay, M.A. New Edition. i8mo. \s, (xL 

mimvnon— AN EPITOME OF THE HISTORY OF THE 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH, By William Simpson, M.A. 
New Edition. Fcap. 8vo. y. 6</. 

TRENCH— By R. C. TRENCH, IXD., Archbishop of Dublin. 

LECTURES ON MEDIEVAL CHURCH HISTORY. 
t Being the substance of Lectures delivered at Queen's College, 

London. Second Edition, revised, 8vo. I2J. 

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